Woman Hollering Creek and Other Stories

( 13 )

Overview

A collection of stories, whose characters give voice to the vibrant and varied life on both sides of the Mexican border. The women in these stories offer tales of pure discovery, filled with moments of infinite and intimate wisdom.

From the author of the widely acclaimed The House on Mango Street comes a story collection of breathtaking range and authority, whose characters give voice to the vibrant and varied life on both sides of the Mexican border. The women in ...

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Woman Hollering Creek: And Other Stories

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Overview

A collection of stories, whose characters give voice to the vibrant and varied life on both sides of the Mexican border. The women in these stories offer tales of pure discovery, filled with moments of infinite and intimate wisdom.

From the author of the widely acclaimed The House on Mango Street comes a story collection of breathtaking range and authority, whose characters give voice to the vibrant and varied life on both sides of the Mexican border. The women in these stories offer tales of pure discovery, filled with moments of infinite and intimate wisdom.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Ranging from prose lyrics of less than a page to much lengthier but still lyrical fictions, these stories are eloquent testimonials to the status of Mexican-American women. Cisneros The House on Mango Street introduces a cast of Chicanas from the environs of San Antonio, Tex., letting us eavesdrop on a series of interior monologues as well crafted as they are expressive. She begins with the self-conscious yet spontaneous effusions of young girls ``You laughing something into my ear that tickles, and me going Ha Ha Ha Ha'', then turns to preadolescents and young women; her speakers evince a shared, uneasy awareness that their self-worth depends on a loyalty to Mexico strained, all the same, by the realities of their lives up North. The restless vamp of ``Never Marry a Mexican'' feels ``ridiculous'' as ``a Mexican girl who couldn't even speak Spanish,'' and cultivates a contempt for her white lover ``nude as a pearl. You've lost your train of smoke'' and his wife ``alive under the flannel and down, and smelling like milk and hand cream''--but she is not sure just what she is envying. In this sensitively structured suite of sketches, however, Cisneros's irony defers to her powers of observation, so that feminism and cultural imperialism, while important issues here, do not overwhelm the narrative. Author tour. Apr.
Library Journal
In this collection of Mexican-American stories, Cisneros addresses the reader in a voice that is alternately buoyant, strong, funny, and sad. The brief vignettes of the opening piece, ``My Lucy Friend Who Smells Like Corn,'' are tiles in a mosaic. Taken together, these vignettes give a vivid, colorful picture of life on the Texas/Mexico border. Family ties are strong: aunts, uncles, cousins, grandparents are all present. The stories are often about the romantic dreams of young girls longing to escape stifling small-town life who discover that things are not much different on the other side of the border. Cisneros has an acute eye for the telling detail that reveals the secrets and the dreams of her characters. She writes with humor and love about people she knows intimately.-- Marcia Tager, Tenafly, N.J.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780679738565
  • Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 3/28/1992
  • Series: Vintage Contemporaries Series
  • Pages: 192
  • Sales rank: 88,097
  • Lexile: 960L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 5.15 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Sandra Cisneros

Sandra Cisneros was born in Chicago in 1954. Internationally acclaimed for her poetry and fiction, she has been the recipient of numerous awards, including the Lannan Literary Award and the American Book Award, and of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the MacArthur Foundation. Cisneros is the author of the novels The House on Mango Street and Caramelo, a collection of short stories Woman Hollering Creek, a book of poetry Loose Woman, and a children's book Hairs/Pelitos. She lives in San Antonio, Texas.

Biography

Sandra Cisneros' first novel, The House on Mango Street, brought an entirely new voice to American literature, describing the experience of narrator Esperanza Cordero, a Mexican American girl living a hardscrabble existence in Chicago. As Bebe Moore Campbell put it, in the New York Times Book Review: "She is not only a gifted writer, but an absolutely essential one."

The book bore the author's powerful descriptive talents: Comparing her house on Mango Street with the "real house" her parents had promised her, Esperanza notes, "The house on Mango street is not the way they told it at all. It's small and red with tight steps in front and windows so small you'd think they were holding their breath."

Cisneros, who grew up in Chicago as the only daughter in a family of seven children, attended college on scholarship and was an ethnic anomaly as a graduate student at University of Iowa's renowned Writers' Workshop. There is a lyric quality to Cisneros' work that makes sense, given her alternate life as a poet who has published several volumes of poetry (two, 1980's Bad Boys and 1985's The Rodrigo Poems, are no longer in print).

As a poet, Cisneros has a staccato, highly evocative style. From "A Few Items to Consider," for example: "First there is the scent of barley/to remember. Barley and rain./The smooth terrain to recollect and savor./Unforgiving whiteness of the room./Ambiguity of linen. Purity./Mute and still as photographs on the moon." Cisneros suffuses her poetry and fiction with healthy dose of Spanish and a feminine sensibility, female narrators who remember everything and for whom no detail or sensation is too small. Paragraphs are often punctuated by lists and five-word snapshots. As Cisneros herself has said, she is a miniaturist.

Her poetry and a 1991 collection of stories, Woman Hollering Creek, would have to tide fans over until the long-awaited release of her second novel, 2002's Caramelo. Like her first novel, the story is narrated by a Mexican-American girl; but the scope is a broader one, covering generations of a family as viewed through a cherished caramelo rebozo, or striped traditional shawl, which has been passed down through generations to the book's heroine.

Caramelo has a comical and occasionally unconventional spirit to it, as when one of the characters in the story breaks in to complain about how she is being portrayed. The novel began as an exploration of her own family, and the connection to Cisneros' own life is evident. Here as in other work, Cisneros fills in the gaps between Mexico and the U.S., personal myth and reality.

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    1. Hometown:
      San Antonio, Texas
    1. Date of Birth:
      December 20, 1954
    2. Place of Birth:
      Chicago, Illinois
    1. Education:
      B.A., Loyola University, 1976; M.F.A., University of Iowa Writers' Workshop, 1978

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 13 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 13 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2009

    Woman Hollering Creek Review

    Woman Hollering Creek, by Sandra Cisneros, is a book of short stories told from the viewpoint of what seems to be multiple different people. The beginnings of the stories tell of times when the narrators were little girls, who they were friends with, what their environments were like. The stories persist into adolescence, where the multiple characters tell of hard times they¿d had. Finally, a few longer stories ended the book by telling of husbands and family and children and trials of adulthood. The stories are all told from the viewpoints of women growing up in a Hispanic culture, and while they share that one fact, each short story still manages to differ from all the rest. All the women have different personalities and opinions, meaning if you switched characters from stories, the stories would have to rewrite themselves. While some stories are a bit mature, Sandra Cisneros did an excellent job of capturing the minds of multiple people within her own in her book Woman Hollering Creek.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 26, 2008

    not really that interesting...

    Don't get me wrong. Some of the stories were good especially the onces from childhood. But most of them dragged on and eventually became boring. It was interesting enough for me to finish it but I was glad the book was over. I really don't have much to say about it. I guess if your into really poetic short-stories this might be for you. None of them really had a plot. If you want an example of a good short story read 'The Lesson 'by Toni Cade Bombara and 'the story of an hour' by kate Chopin.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 28, 2007

    soulful ,deep and poignant short stories

    I loved this book and I love Sandra Ciscernos. It is poetic and beautiful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 25, 2005

    This Book Is Awesome!

    Thia book is great! IT was a page turner that I coundn't put down!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 2, 2005

    Great Stories

    I loved the book! The stories gave an insight to the lives and situations of the characters. These female characters expressed the latino culture in many different situations and gave the image of women having strong and weak characters. I suggest you read this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 29, 2005

    REMARKABLE!!

    EACH PAGE IS AS ENCHANTING AS THE NEXT.BEAUTIFULLY WRITTEN. IT IS AN ABSOULTE MUST FOR ANY PROUD LATINA!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2005

    Interesting

    The stories included in this collection are very diverse. It is written to appeal largely to a bilingual audience, but if you're not a Spanish speaker, don't worry- she reiterates everything in English. In the opening pages I wondered whether the author was not rather ill-educated, but as it turns out the narrative voice changes with each story, and Cisneros herself is actually quite brilliant. A word of warning to my fellow light-skinned readers: only read this if you don't mind being insulted from time to time.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 11, 2002

    confusion

    It is really confusion book to read. Too many Latin laguage without the meaning.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 16, 2008

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    Posted December 15, 2008

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    Posted March 16, 2009

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    Posted September 10, 2010

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    Posted March 21, 2011

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