Woman Hollering Creek: And Other Stories

Woman Hollering Creek: And Other Stories

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by Sandra Cisneros
     
 

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A collection of stories, whose characters give voice to the vibrant and varied life on both sides of the Mexican border. The women in these stories offer tales of pure discovery, filled with moments of infinite and intimate wisdom.See more details below

Overview

NOW AVAILABLE IN EBOOK FOR THE FIRST TIME

A collection of stories, whose characters give voice to the vibrant and varied life on both sides of the Mexican border. The women in these stories offer tales of pure discovery, filled with moments of infinite and intimate wisdom.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Ranging from prose lyrics of less than a page to much lengthier (but still lyrical) fictions, these stories are eloquent testimonials to the status of Mexican-American women. Cisneros ( The House on Mango Street ) introduces a cast of Chicanas from the environs of San Antonio, Tex., letting us eavesdrop on a series of interior monologues as well crafted as they are expressive. She begins with the self-conscious yet spontaneous effusions of young girls (``You laughing something into my ear that tickles, and me going Ha Ha Ha Ha''), then turns to preadolescents and young women; her speakers evince a shared, uneasy awareness that their self-worth depends on a loyalty to Mexico strained, all the same, by the realities of their lives up North. The restless vamp of ``Never Marry a Mexican'' feels ``ridiculous'' as ``a Mexican girl who couldn't even speak Spanish,'' and cultivates a contempt for her white lover (``nude as a pearl. You've lost your train of smoke'') and his wife (``alive under the flannel and down, and smelling like milk and hand cream'')--but she is not sure just what she is envying. In this sensitively structured suite of sketches, however, Cisneros's irony defers to her powers of observation, so that feminism and cultural imperialism, while important issues here, do not overwhelm the narrative. Author tour. (Apr.)
Library Journal
In this collection of Mexican-American stories, Cisneros addresses the reader in a voice that is alternately buoyant, strong, funny, and sad. The brief vignettes of the opening piece, ``My Lucy Friend Who Smells Like Corn,'' are tiles in a mosaic. Taken together, these vignettes give a vivid, colorful picture of life on the Texas/Mexico border. Family ties are strong: aunts, uncles, cousins, grandparents are all present. The stories are often about the romantic dreams of young girls longing to escape stifling small-town life who discover that things are not much different on the other side of the border. Cisneros has an acute eye for the telling detail that reveals the secrets and the dreams of her characters. She writes with humor and love about people she knows intimately.-- Marcia Tager, Tenafly, N.J.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780804150880
Publisher:
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date:
04/30/2013
Series:
Vintage Contemporaries
Sold by:
Random House
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
192
Sales rank:
156,541
File size:
2 MB

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