Woman of the People by Benjamin Capps | Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Woman of the People / Edition 1

Woman of the People / Edition 1

4.5 2
by Benjamin Capps
     
 

ISBN-10: 087565195X

ISBN-13: 2900875651957

Pub. Date: 01/28/1999

Publisher: Texas Christian University Press


A Woman of the People is one of Texas’ best-known and most-respected novels. In this story of the Texas frontier, Capps dramatizes the capture by a Comanche band of a ten-year-old white girl and her five-year-old sister from the upper reaches of the Brazos River a decade before the Civil War.

As the narrative progresses, Helen Morrison

Overview


A Woman of the People is one of Texas’ best-known and most-respected novels. In this story of the Texas frontier, Capps dramatizes the capture by a Comanche band of a ten-year-old white girl and her five-year-old sister from the upper reaches of the Brazos River a decade before the Civil War.

As the narrative progresses, Helen Morrison slowly—and almost unbeknownst to herself—goes from being a frightened, rebellious white girl to becoming “a woman of the people.” Like many of the people who figure in true-life Indian captivity narratives, Helen adopts the ways of the Comanches, marries a member of her small band, and becomes a major figure in tribal life.

A Woman of the People parallels in some ways the real story of Cynthia Ann Parker, who was taken by Comanches, married Peta Nocona, and became the mother of the celebrated Quanah Parker, the last great chief of the Comanches. But unlike the real-life Cynthia Ann Parker story, where many mysteries abound, the novel takes the reader inside the mind of the main character, and we are allowed to grow with her as she forgets her white heritage and Helen and becomes Tehanita (Little Girl Texan).

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2900875651957
Publisher:
Texas Christian University Press
Publication date:
01/28/1999
Series:
Texas Tradition Series
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
248

Table of Contents

Contents

1. West Toward the Setting Sun,
2. Winter on the Goodwater,
3. Winter When the Buffalo Hid,
4. Incident at Medicine Mounds,
5. Mountains That Wander Away,
6. One Spring in Blanco Canyon,
7. Winter in the Sand Hills,
8. The Wide Mouth Raid to Mexico,
9. The Offer of Nine Horses,
10. Message of a Metal Horn,
11. Story Teller,
12. Return of Ute Killer,
13. The Winter of Living in Graves,
14. The White Banner,
Afterword,
Note,

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Woman of the People 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
ElfinWilde More than 1 year ago
I first read this book when I was in junior high school nearly forty (!) years ago. It was a book that stuck with me, although I didn't remember the author's name and couldn't find the book again until, serendiptiously, I saw it on the book wall of a thrift shop. It is as good and as authentic as I remembered. Nine -year-old Helen Morrison and her five-year-old sister Katy are captured by Comanches during a raid. Vowing to escape back to white people with her little sister, Helen conforms to the Comanche way of life to earn their trust to facilitate the escape. As the years go by Katy forgets that she was ever white and that Helen was her sister. The book follows the Mutsani clan of the Comanche in their every-day life of following the buffalo, of feast, of famine, of the declining buffalo, of customs, rivalries, enemies, friends, of happiness, of the agony of loss, and of being brutaly hunted by soldiers determined to either force them on the Reservations or wipe them out completely. Helen must finally decide who she really is, Helen Morrison or Tehanita, a slave or a Woman of the People.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a very interesting book. It's historically accurate, and is fun to read. I enjoyed reading it. Only reason I did not give a 5 star rating is because the book gets a little boring towards the beginning. But the rest of the books if FABULOUS!
Guest More than 1 year ago
the book really depicts a good setting of American history and gives you an idea of how things are. a great story that captures both feelings and portrays an image that we do not always see... a good book