Woman's Dictionary of Symbols and Sacred Objects

Woman's Dictionary of Symbols and Sacred Objects

4.6 3
by Barbara G. Walker, Jane Alan Walker
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

This fascinating guide to the history and mythology of woman-related symbols features:

  • Unique organization by shape of symbol or type of sacred object

  • 21 different sections including Round and Oval Motifs, Sacred Objects, Secular-Sacred Objects, Rituals, Deities' Signs, Supernaturals, Body Parts, Nature, Birds, Plants, Minerals,

Overview

This fascinating guide to the history and mythology of woman-related symbols features:

  • Unique organization by shape of symbol or type of sacred object

  • 21 different sections including Round and Oval Motifs, Sacred Objects, Secular-Sacred Objects, Rituals, Deities' Signs, Supernaturals, Body Parts, Nature, Birds, Plants, Minerals, Stones and Shells, and more

  • Introductory essays for each section

  • 753 entries and 636 illustrations

  • Alphabetical index for easy reference

Three-Rayed Sun The sun suspended in heaven by three powers, perhaps the Triple Goddess who gave birth to it (see Three-Way Motifs).

Corn Dolly An embodiment of the harvest to be set in the center of the harvest dance, or fed to the cattle to 'make them thrive year round' (see Secular-Sacred Objects).

Tongue In Asia, the extended tongue was a sign of life-force as the tongue between the lips imitated the sacred lingam-yoni: male within female genital. Sticking out the tongue is still a polite sign of greeting in northern India and Tibet (see Body Parts).

Cosmic Egg In ancient times the primeval universe-or the Great Mother-took the form of an egg. It carried all numbers and letters within an ellipse, to show that everything is contained within one form at the beginning (see Round and Oval Motifs).

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
On the language of symbols, many of which, the author maintains, were stolen from ancient women-centered systems and reinterpreted from a male standpoint. This guide is organized by shape of symbol or type of sacred object and includes 21 different sections, introductory essays for each section, 753 entries and 636 illustrations, and an alphabetical index for cross-reference purposes. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780062509239
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
11/28/1988
Pages:
576
Sales rank:
1,190,685
Product dimensions:
6.12(w) x 9.25(h) x 1.44(d)

Meet the Author

Barbara G. Walker, author of The Woman's Encyclopedia of Myths and Secrets, The Woman's Dictionary of Symbols and Sacred Objects, and many other books, is a member of the Morris Museum Mineralogical Society and the Trailside Mineral Club of the New Jersey Earth Science Association.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Woman's Dictionary of Symbols and Sacred Objects 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
LuvSeattle More than 1 year ago
I've often wondered how many meanings can be behind symbols like circles, crosses, animals and the like. This book is filled with many and provides enough info to let the inquirer know if it's something worthwhile for them to use or explore further. It's one of my favorite books!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great for folks who are interested in understanding the meaning behind everyday symbols; those looking for a quick reference; therapists who have clients that wish to know the traditional meaning behind everyday symbols, i.e., a quick reference so that therapy is not interrupted by lengthy research; or someone looking to gain insight/ideas into creation of art such as tatoos, paintings, cross-stitching, etc. Only drawback is the info provided is not too lengthy--perhaps the author could follow-up with more in-depth explanations in the new edition??? Overall, I enjoy and love this book and show it to my colleagues who also work with symbology in a therapeutic context.