Women at Work: An Economic Perspective

Overview

Covering employment and wage gender gaps, participation of women, fertility, and the welfare of children, this insightful volume discusses how the trend towards greater participation of women in labour markets interacts with gender differences in pay. It focuses on the scope for increasing the number of women in the labour force without negatively affecting the development of their children.

The need for this volume has become self evident. At the Spring 2000 Lisbon meeting of ...

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Women at Work: An Economic Perspective

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Overview

Covering employment and wage gender gaps, participation of women, fertility, and the welfare of children, this insightful volume discusses how the trend towards greater participation of women in labour markets interacts with gender differences in pay. It focuses on the scope for increasing the number of women in the labour force without negatively affecting the development of their children.

The need for this volume has become self evident. At the Spring 2000 Lisbon meeting of the European Council the Heads of Governments of the EU agreed to accelerate the greater participation of women in the labour market. However, neither in Lisbon nor in the subsequent Spring European Councils of the EU was it discussed how to achieve this target-and the trade-offs that would be involved in increasing the participation of women in paid employment.

Policies for increasing participation must involve some losers, or they would already have been implemented everywhere. If distributional considerations and policy trade-offs are ignored, it is only possible to set virtual targets, neglecting the reforms needed to achieve them. This book sets out a better informed policy debate about these issues, paving the way to more realistic targets and ways to achieve them.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780199281886
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  • Publication date: 6/1/2005
  • Pages: 292
  • Product dimensions: 9.10 (w) x 6.10 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Tito Boeri is Professor of Economics at Bocconi University, Milan, and Director of the Fondazione Rodolfo Debenedetti. He is research fellow of CEPR (Centre for Economic Policy Research) and of the Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan. He obtained a Ph.D. in Economics from New York University and was senior economist at the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) from 1987 to 1996. Daniela Del Boca is Professor of Economics at the University of Turin and is Director of the newly established Center for Household Income, Labour and Demographic economics (CHILD). She has previously been President of the European Society of Population Economists, Professor at the Politechnic of Milan, Visiting Fellow at the University of Wisconsin, and Visiting Professor at New York University and Johns Hopkins. Christopher Pissarides is Professor of Economics at London School of Economics. He has held visiting positions at Yale University, UCLA, University of California at Berkeley and Harvard University. Christopher is currently a specialist adviser to House of Commons Treasury Committee, a member of the Cyprus Monetary Policy Committee and Research Fellow at the Centre for Economic Policy Research and IZA.

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Table of Contents

Introduction : more women at work in Europe 1
Pt. I Women in the labor force : how well is Europe doing? 7
1 Introduction 9
2 Women's employment patterns : some facts 12
3 Explanations behind women's employment patterns 25
4 Job segregation 39
5 Wage gaps 65
6 Rising female participation : the consequences for other workers 83
7 What policy should do 96
Pt. II Women's participation in the labor market and fertility : the effects of social policies 121
8 Labor supply and fertility in Europe and the US 125
9 Parental employment and children's welfare 154
10 Changes in labor market participation and family income distribution 194
11 Taxes, transfers, labor supply and household welfare 205
12 What policy should do 237
Comments 240
Women in the labor market and in the Lisbon strategy 265
A jobless and childless Europe? 268
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