Women Editing Modernism: "Little" Magazines and Literary History

Overview

" For many years young writers experimenting with forms and aesthetics in the early decades of this century, small journals known collectively as "little" magazines were the key to recognition. Joyce, Stein, Eliot, Pound, Hemingway, and scores of other iconoclastic writers now considered central to modernism received little encouragement from the established publishers. It was the avant-garde magazines, many of them headed by women, that fostered new talent and found a readership for it. Jayne Marek examines the work of seven women editors --

... See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (17) from $5.62   
  • New (7) from $20.00   
  • Used (10) from $5.62   
Sending request ...

Overview

" For many years young writers experimenting with forms and aesthetics in the early decades of this century, small journals known collectively as "little" magazines were the key to recognition. Joyce, Stein, Eliot, Pound, Hemingway, and scores of other iconoclastic writers now considered central to modernism received little encouragement from the established publishers. It was the avant-garde magazines, many of them headed by women, that fostered new talent and found a readership for it. Jayne Marek examines the work of seven women editors -- Harriet Monroe, Alice Corbin Henderson, Margaret Anderson, Jane Heap, H.D., Bryher (Winifred Ellerman), and Marianne Moore -- whose varied activities, often behind the scenes and in collaboration with other women, contributed substantially to the development of modernist literature. Through such publications as Poetry, The Little Review, The Dial, and Close Up, these women had a profound influence that has been largely overlooked by literary historians. Marek devotes a chapter as well to the interactions of these editors with Ezra Pound, who depended upon but also derided their literary tastes and accomplishments. Pound's opinions have had lasting influence in shaping critical responses to women editors of the early twentieth century. In the current reevaluation of modernism, this important book, long overdue, offers an indispensable introduction to the formative influence of women editors, both individually and in their collaborative efforts. Jayne Marek is associate professor of English at Franklin College.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"An informed and nuanced study of women catalyzing modernism by their work as editors. A serious addition to the new narratives of modernism, making a notable contribution to an evolving feminist scholarship." -- Rachel Blau DuPlessis

"For readers interested not only in women's studies, but also publishing history and modern literature." -- Small Press Book Review

"Marek constructs a powerful, alternative account of seven women who, in primary ways, shaped the aethetics of modernism and the modernist canon. She brings them alive -- not as personalities or psyches, but as critical intelligences who had independent views about literature and used their magazines to express and test them." -- South Atlantic Review

"Sticks a further and very substantial puncture in the rapidly deflating balloon of male modernist supremacy... A thoughtful and scrupulously researched study." -- The Review of English Studies

"Offers detailed, carefully-documented, and absorbing accounts of behind-the-scenes dealings both with texts and their authors." -- Tulsa Studies in Women's Literature

"Make[s] a very effective case both for the shaping influence of these women and for the continued study of the little magazine as a forcefield of literary modernism." -- Yearbook of English Studies

Library Journal
Focusing on the role of seven American and English women in editing and publishing influential avant-garde literary journals in the early decades of the 20th century, Marek, a Fulbright fellow in Hungary, argues that women were more instrumental in the evolution of modernism than is generally acknowledged. She devotes individual chapters to Harriet Monroe, founder of Poetry (in 1912), and her first coeditor, Alice Corbin Henderson; Margaret Anderson and Jane Heap, editors of the Little Review (1914-29); and Marianne Moore, editor of the Dial (1925-29), among others. In the final chapter, Marek explores interactions between the women editors and the male literary establishment, specifically regarding Ezra Pound. Although a few of Marek's interpretations may be questioned, the overall evidence that women editors played an important role in promoting critical dialog, new ideas, and new literature cannot be denied. This important scholarly study provides the groundwork for further research.Jeris Cassel, Rutgers Univ. Libs., New Brunswick, N.J.
Booknews
A fine introduction to the formative influence of women editors, both individually and in their collaborative efforts, in fostering new literary talent during the early decades of this century. Includes a detailed examination of the work of seven remarkable women editors. Paper edition (unseen), $14.95. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780813108544
  • Publisher: University Press of Kentucky
  • Publication date: 3/15/2012
  • Pages: 264
  • Product dimensions: 0.62 (w) x 6.00 (h) x 9.00 (d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
1 Making Their Ways: Women Editors of "Little" Magazines 1
2 Beginning in Chicago: Harriet Monroe, Alice Corbin Henderson, and Poetry 23
3 Reader Critics: Margaret Anderson, Jane Heap, and the Little Review 60
4 Toward International Cooperation: The Literary Editing of H. D. and Bryher 101
5 The Ironic "Editorial We": Marianne Moore at the Dial 138
6 A Distorting Lens: Ezra Pound and Literary Editors 167
Afterword: Further Speculations 193
Notes 203
Bibliography 227
Index 241
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)