Women Explorers

Women Explorers

3.7 4
by Julia Cummins, Cheryl Harness
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Meet ten inspiring women whose passions for exploration made them push the boundaries

Though most people have heard of explorers like Henry Hudson and Christopher Columbus, few have heard names like Nellie Cashman and Annie Smith Peck. Unfortunately, most of the brave women explorers have never made it into history books because they lived in times when it

Overview

Meet ten inspiring women whose passions for exploration made them push the boundaries

Though most people have heard of explorers like Henry Hudson and Christopher Columbus, few have heard names like Nellie Cashman and Annie Smith Peck. Unfortunately, most of the brave women explorers have never made it into history books because they lived in times when it was taboo for women to go off on their own. Luckily, the daring women in this book didn't let those taboos slow them down as they climbed treacherous mountains, studied Aboriginal cultures, and lived with Pygmy tribes!

With engaging text and bold illustrations, Women Explorers will finally properly introduce these adventurous women to the world.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Cummins masterfully includ[es] interesting details . . . Informative and entertaining." — School Library Journal

"The figures included in the book are worth remembering not just because they were women but because they were remarkable adventure-seekers and barrier-breakers." — Booklist

"In an engaging, informative style, Cummins highlights fascinating facts about these feisty females 'who conquered the unknown.'" — Kirkus

Booklist

"The figures included in the book are worth remembering not just because they were women but because they were remarkable adventure-seekers and barrier-breakers."
Children's Literature - Barbara L. Talcroft
Spanning dates of birth from 1835 to 1893, the lives of ten adventurous women in the nineteenth- and twentieth-centuries make up this collective biography. Each story is short, accompanied by Harness's often amusing paintings that will make today's girls wonder how these intrepid explorers ever managed. Cummins has selected different locales and various fields for their explorations and accomplishments. To the Middle East went Alexandrine Tinne and Freya Stark; both rode camels (in skirts) and suffered illnesses, though Tinne was murdered en route, while Stark lived to be one hundred and was honored by Queen Elizabeth for her work in Intelligence during World War II. Though it's hard to choose, perhaps most unusual was Violet Cressy-Marcks, who traveled in faraway Finland and Russia above the Arctic Circle, then to the Andes, and later to China where she interviewed Mao Tse-tung at his headquarters. As a journalist she covered China in World War II and the war crime trials in Nurnberg, Germany. Others explored Africa, Australia, the Arctic, the Amazon, and the South Pacific, overcoming sickness and injuries, intense heat or cold, danger from native peoples, primitive conditions—often provoking scandal at home. Their activities ranged from photographing, writing, collecting exotic insects, animals, or plants to mountain climbing, hunting with pygmies, and cooking for remote gold miners. Truly, a book to inspire other explorers and to evoke admiration for these women's resolution, independence, and endurance! (The author might have commented that gleefully shooting elephants and polar bears is not admired today.) As a bonus, Cummins includes very brief sketches of ten other daring women—just asking for more research. Reviewer: Barbara L. Talcroft
School Library Journal
Gr 3–6—At a time when "even the idea of women wearing pants was scandalous," Louise Boyd explored the Arctic; Ynes Mexia lived with headhunters while collecting plant specimens in the Amazon; Alexandrine Tinné searched for the source of the Nile River; and the knowledge gained by Freya Stark's travels into remote areas of the Middle East benefited the British War Office during World War II. The 10 women profiled, all of whom were born in the mid- to late-1800s, shared a desire to learn, a taste for adventure, and a bravery that sustained them through dangerous situations. As in Women Daredevils (Dutton, 2008), Cummins masterfully including interesting details without making the portraits too complicated. Hints of marital problems or family issues help explain why these women were willing to venture out on their own, but the author keeps her child audience in mind. Most of the women are white Americans or Europeans but their travels were as far-ranging as Alaska, the South Pacific, the Andes, Russia, and China. Harness's watercolor paintings are outlined in black, giving the women pictured a sense of strength and determination. The illustrations capture the foreign backgrounds well and help delineate the explorers' travels. Informative and entertaining, this book is an excellent addition to most collections.—Lucinda Snyder Whitehurst, St. Christopher's School, Richmond, VA
Kirkus Reviews
After showcasing risk-taking gals in Women Daredevils (2007), Cummins introduces 10 "dauntless" women born before 1900 whose little-known deeds "contribut[ed] to science, geography, history, and cultural understanding" at a time when "proper ladies simply did not go gallivanting around the world to explore new territories." Starting with Louise Boyd, who traded stylish dresses for boots and breeches to explore the Arctic, and closing with Daisy Bates, who studied Australian Aborigines for 35 years, Cummins presents breezy three-to-four–page biographies of her unconventional females. The variety of their endeavors astound. Nellie Cashman "rushed" for gold in British Columbia, the Klondike and Alaska; botanist Ynes Mexia collected thousands of plants in the wilderness of Mexico, the United States and the Amazon; Lucy Cheesman sojourned with cannibals while studying insects in the South Pacific. Suffragist Annie Peck scaled Europe and South America's highest peaks. Dutch heiress Alexandrine Tinné searched for the Nile's source and was murdered traversing the Sahara. Delia Akeley became the first woman to cross Africa. Violet Cressy-Marcks made eight trips around the world, and Freya Stark traveled throughout the Middle East. In an engaging, informative style, Cummins highlights fascinating facts about these feisty females "who conquered the unknown." Dramatic watercolor illustrations memorialize each. Should attract aspiring adventurers. (author's note and list of additional female explorers; selected bibliography, websites) (Collective biography. 9-11)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781101575642
Publisher:
Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date:
02/16/2012
Sold by:
Penguin Group
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
48
Lexile:
NC1150L (what's this?)
File size:
11 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

Julie Cummins was the coordinator of children's services for the New York Public Library for several years. Her previous book with Cheryl Harness, Women Daredevils, received two starred reviews. She lives in Canandaigua, New York.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Women Explorers 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Im going to be an explorer when i grow up
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Its life poop
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Person who named there healine emergency your stupid and wierd
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I TOOTED . IT STINKY!!!!!!!! :D PLOP PLOP THAT SOUND OF ME POOPING.