Women in Colonial India: Historical Documents and Sources

Overview

Co-published by Routledge and Edition Synapse, this new title makes key archival source material readily available to scholars, researchers, and students of Indian imperial history. The collection will be particularly welcomed by those working in women’s and gender studies, and in women’s history, but also by those active in allied and related fields. Selected and introduced by an expert editor, the gathered materials are reproduced in facsimile, giving users a strong sense of immediacy to the texts and ...

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Overview

Co-published by Routledge and Edition Synapse, this new title makes key archival source material readily available to scholars, researchers, and students of Indian imperial history. The collection will be particularly welcomed by those working in women’s and gender studies, and in women’s history, but also by those active in allied and related fields. Selected and introduced by an expert editor, the gathered materials are reproduced in facsimile, giving users a strong sense of immediacy to the texts and permitting citation to the original pagination.

Women in Colonial India is a veritable treasure-trove; it brings together key colonial documents and other materials which are currently widely dispersed or very difficult for scholars, researchers, and students across the globe to locate and use. In five volumes, the collection draws on a wide variety of sources, including periodicals, memoirs, parliamentary, and administrative reports. It covers crucial gendered concerns and topics, such as ‘the woman question’; female infanticide; widow-burning; education; health; and marriage. Each volume is supplemented by a substantial introduction, newly written by the learned editor, which contextualizes the collected works, and this vital reference and research resource also includes a detailed appendix providing data on the provenance of the gathered works.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780415525558
  • Publisher: Taylor & Francis
  • Publication date: 10/22/2013
  • Pages: 2352

Table of Contents

Volume I: The Woman Question

1. ‘Account of the Zenana of an Asiatic Chief’, The Edinburgh Magazine, or Literary Miscellany, Nov. 1789, 350–3.

2. ‘Description of Tippoo Sultaun’s Zenana’, The Weekly Entertainer, 16 Dec. 1799, 494–5.

3. ‘Nautch-Girls’, Calcutta Journal, 20 Oct. 1819.

4. Review of W. B. Hockley’s The Zenana, The Oriental Herald and Journal of General Literature, June 1827, 499–510.

5. EMMA ROBERTS—Extract from Scenes and Characteristics of Hindoostan (London: W. H. Allen, 1835), Vol. 1, pp. 248–53.

6. ‘The Doorga Pooja Nautches’, Friend of India, 4 Oct. 1838, 565.

7. J. W. MASSIE—Extracts from Continental India; Travelling Sketches and Historical Recollections Illustrating the Antiquity, Religion and Manners of Hindoos, the Extent of British Conquests and the Progress of Missionary Operations (London: T. Ward, 1840), Vol. II, pp. 149–66, 175–7, 192–7.

8. JULIA MAITLAND—Extract from Letters from Madras (London: J. Murray, 1846), pp. 28–9.

9. FANNY PARKES—Extracts from Wanderings of a Pilgrim in Search of the Picturesque (London: P. Richardson, 1850), Vol. I, pp. 29–30, 87–91, 166–7, 378–89, 447–57.

10. JOHN SHARP—‘Trials and Difficulties of Married Christian Converts’, The Indian Female Evangelist, 1 Apr. 1873, No. VI., Vol. 1, 241–9.

11. L. MACDONALD—‘An Appeal to England’s Daughters for Help, to Raise their Indian Sisters from Idolatry, Superstition and Degradation’, The Indian Female Evangelist, Jan. 1875, 219–23.

12. From MISS GOOD’s Journal—‘Extracts from the Recent Correspondence of our Missionaries in India’, The Indian Female Evangelist, Jan. 1875, 233–7.

13. W. SALTER PRICE—‘A Plea for the Women of India’, The Indian Female Evangelist, Oct. 1875, 337–43.

14. GEORGE WHEELER—Extract from India in 1875–76: Visit of the Prince of Wales (London: Chapman and Hall, 1876), pp. 177–8.

15. ‘Hindoo Women’, The London Reader, 8 May 1880, 28.

16. ‘Some Noble Indian Women—Part I’, Golden Hours, July 1880, 483–6.

17. ‘Some Noble Indian Women—Part II’, Golden Hours, Oct. 1880, 663–6.

18. ‘Some Noble Indian Women—Part III’, Golden Hours, Dec. 1880, 842–5.

19. ‘Zenana Missions in India’, Golden Hours, Mar. 1880, 176–83.

20. WILLIAM ARTHUR—‘Woman’s Work in the Zenanas of India—Second Paper’, The Wesleyan-Methodist Magazine, Apr. 1882, 290–8.

21. WILLIAM ARTHUR—‘Woman’s Work in the Zenanas of India—Concluding Paper’, The Wesleyan-Methodist Magazine, May 1882, 364–8.

22. ‘Zenana Life in India’, Quiver, Jan. 1882, 592–6.

23. H. G. KEENE—‘Women of Indian History’, The National Review, Oct. 1886, 157–66.

24. ‘Rise of a Women’s Movement in India’, The Sentinel, Feb. 1887, 15.

25. ‘A Day with the Zenanas’, Quiver, Jan. 1888, 451–5.

26. LESTER RAMSAY DE FONBLANQUE—‘The Social Status of Women in India’, Fortnightly Review, Sept. 1888, 363–72.

27. ‘The Indian Woman and Her Wrongs’, The Saturday Review, 20 Sept. 1890, 341–2.

28. MARCHIONESS OF DUFFERIN AND AVA—The Women of India’, The Review of Reviews, Mar. 1891, 255.

29. MISS HENSLEY—‘Mohammedan Women of Calcutta’, India’s Women, Jan. 1892, 28–9.

30. JEP—‘The Early History of Zenana Missions in Bengal—Part V: Lifting the Purdah’, India’s Women, May 1892, 205–9.

31. T. A. GURNEY—‘India’s Women’, India’s Women, Jan. 1893, 3–6.

32. D. L. WOOLMER—‘Child Wives and Child Widows of India’, The Quiver, Jan. 1897, 579–85.

33. SALENI ARMSTRONG-HOPKINS—‘The Zenana Woman and her Purdah Home’, from Within the Purdah (New York: Eaton and Mains, 1898), pp. 90–3, 129.

34. MARCUS B. FULLER—‘The Zenana’, from The Wrongs of Indian Womanhood (New York: Caxton, 1900), pp. 76–84, 88–99.

35. MARCUS B. FULLER—‘An Anti-nautch Movement’, from The Wrongs of Indian Womanhood (New York: Caxton, 1900), pp. 140–7.

36. MARCUS B. FULLER—‘What Government Has Done’, from The Wrongs of Indian Womanhood (New York: Caxton, 1900), pp. 191–210.

37. EUGENE STOCK—‘Women’s Work’, from Notes on India for Missionary Students (London: Church Missionary Society, 1905), pp. 76–83.

38. JOHN MORRISON—‘Woman’s Place’, from New Ideas in India During the Nineteenth Century: A Study of Social, Political and Religious Developments (Edinburgh: George A. Morton, 1906), pp. 50–64.

39. J. D. REES—‘Social Reform’, from The Real India (London: Methuen, 1908), pp. 256–69.

40. WILLIAM BOLTON—‘Work Amongst Women and Girls’, from Handbook to Our Missionary Fields: North India (London: London Missionary Society, 1909), pp. 37–41.

41. ‘India’s Women’, from Introductory Lessons on India and Missions for Mission Study Classes, 2nd edn. (London: Christian Literature Society, 1909), pp. 19–27.

42. FLORENCE L. NICHOLS—Lilavati Singh: A Sketch (Boston: Women’s Foreign Missionary Society, 1909), pp. 5–62.

43. ZEBINA FLAVIUS GRIFFIN—Chundra Lela: The Story of a Hindu Devotee and Christian Missionary (Philadelphia: Griffith and Rowland, 1911), pp. 11–84.

44. Extract from Second Annual Report, Women’s Branch Bombay Presidency War and Relief Fund (1916), pp. 12–18.

45. HELENA NORMANTON—‘Indian Women as Citizens’, from India in England (Madras: S. Ganesan, 1921), pp. 52–8.

46. MASON OLCOTT—‘Social Conservatism and Aspirations’ and ‘Place of Women Teachers’, from Village Schools in India: An Investigation with Suggestions (Calcutta: Russell Street, 1926), pp. 46–9, 196–9.

47. MARGARET COUSINS—‘Indian Womanhood and Changing Education’, from Indian Womanhood Today (Allahabad: Kitabistan, 1941), pp. 97–111.

48. MARGARET COUSINS—‘Changing Values for Indian Womanhood’, from Indian Womanhood Today (Allahabad: Kitabistan, 1941), pp. 124–39.

49. J. Z. HODGE—‘Women and the National Awakening’, from Salute to India (London: SCM, 1944), pp. 61–8.

Volume II: Female Infanticide

50. EDWARD MOOR—Extracts from Hindu Infanticide (1811), pp. 254–60, 270–4.

51. JOHN CORMACK—‘Manner of Destroying Female Infants’, ‘Difficulties Experienced by Colonel Walker … in the Abolition of Female Infanticide’ and ‘Effects of the Abolition of Infanticide’ from Account of Female Infanticide in Guzerat (London: Black, Parry and Co., 1815), pp. 68–82, 121–51, 232–45.

52. Review of John Cormack’s Account of the Abolition of Female Infanticide in Guzerat, The Literary Panorama, May 1815, 210–18.

53. ‘Female Infanticide’, from Selections from the Indian Journals, Vol. II (Calcutta Journal) (Calcutta: Firma KL Mukhopadhyay, 1965), pp. 31–3.

54. ‘Female Infanticide’, The Literary Examiner, Oct. 1823, 265–8.

55. ‘Practice of Female Infanticide Still Prevailing in India’, Parliamentary Review and Family Magazine, July 1834, 1080–1.

56. ‘On Female Infanticide in Cutch’, The Journal of the Asiatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland (ser. 1, vol. 1, 1834), 285–9.

57. ALEXANDER BURNES—‘On Infanticide in Rajasthan’, Calcutta Christian Observer, Feb. 1835, 57–66.

58. ‘Female Infanticide’, from The Administration of the East India Company: A History of Indian Progress (London: R. Bentley, 1853), pp. 545–86.

59. JOHN WILLIAM KAYE—‘Suppression of Female Infanticide in India’, Gentleman’s Magazine and Historical Review, July 1854, 13–16.

60. J. H.—‘Indian Infanticide: Its Character and Motives’, ‘The Punjab: Its Infanticidal Races’, ‘Concluding Remarks’, from Indian Infanticide: Its Origins, Progress, and Suppression (London: W. H. Allen, 1857), pp. 1–19, 108–29, 196–206.

61. J. C. BROWN—Extract from Parliamentary Papers No. 426 (1824), 19–128.

62. Extracts from Parliamentary Papers No. 548 (1828), 6, 15–17, 29, 33–5, 37–8.

63. Review of Parliamentary Papers on Female Infanticide (1824, 1828, 1843), Calcutta Review, 1st Series, Vol. 1 (1844), 372–91.

64. M. I.—‘Female Infanticide in the Punjab’, Calcutta Review, Jan. 1897, 145–76.

65. J. EDGAR THURSTON —Extract from Ethnographic Notes in Southern India (Madras: Superintendent, Government Press, 1906), pp. 502–9.

Volume III: Sati

66. J. Z. HOLWELL—Extract from Interesting Historical Events, Relative to the Provinces of Bengal and the Empire of Indostan, Part II (London: T. Becket and P. A. De Hondt, 1767), pp. 87–100.

67. JOHN WILSON—‘The Custom of Women Burning themselves with their Husbands Still Practised in India’, The Weekly Miscellany, 19 Jan. 1778, 374–6.

68. ‘Narrative of an Hindoo Woman, who lately Burnt herself on the Funeral Pile of her Husband’, The Weekly Entertainer, 25 June 1804, 515–16.

69. ‘Account of an Indian Woman Burning Herself’, Scots Magazine and Edinburgh Literary Miscellany, Mar. 1809, 180–1.

70. ‘Burning of Widows’, ‘Burning of Widows’, ‘Horrible Human Sacrifice’, ‘Another Sacrifice’, ‘Prevented Sacrifice’, ‘Burning of Widows’, from Selections from the Indian Journals, Vol. I (Calcutta Journal) (Calcutta: Firma KL Mukhopadhyay, 1963), pp. 109–11, 130–1, 255–7, 268–9, 286–96.

71. ‘Immolation of Widows’, ‘Suttee Defeated’, ‘Burning of Widows’, ‘Suttee at Sulkeah’, from Selections from the Indian Journals, Vol. II (Calcutta Journal) (Calcutta: Firma KL Mukhopadhyay, 1965), pp. 41–69, 85–9, 94–8, 509–12.

72. ‘Female Immolations in India’, Calcutta Journal, June 1822, 601–6.

73. Extracts from Parliamentary Papers, paper 749 (1821), 22–32, 41–4, 48–9, 65, 126–31, 137–9, 227–9, 234–6, 248, 268–9, 271.

74. Extracts from Parliamentary Papers, paper 443 (1824), 3–5, 41–4, 46–50.

75. JOHN BORTHWICK GILCHRIST—‘Opinion on the Burning of Hindoo Widows, Entertained Forty Years Ago’, The Oriental Herald and Journal of General Literature, Dec. 1825, 527–9.

76. Extracts from Parliamentary Papers, paper 518 (1825), 6–8, 18–26, 82–5, 147–56, 169–74, 181–4, 186–91, 194–204.

77. Extracts from Parliamentary Papers, paper 354 (1826–7), 1–34, 38–42, 50, 125, 127, 131–2, 141.

78. ‘Official Papers Laid Before Parliament Respecting the Burning of Hindoo Widows’, The Oriental Herald and Journal of General Literature, Dec. 1827, 399–412.

79. PHILIP—‘Burning of Hindoo and European Women’, The Oriental Herald and Journal of General Literature, Apr. 1827, 37–9.

80. ‘Suttee at Howrah’, Calcutta Gazette, 2 May 1825. In The Days of John Company: Selections from the Calcutta Gazette 1824-1832, compiled and edited by Anil Chandra Das (1959), pp. 308–10.

81. LORD WILLIAM BENTINCK—Lord William Bentinck on the Suppression of Sati, 8 Nov. 1829. In Speeches and Documents on Indian Policy, Vol. 1, ed. A. Berriedale Keith (London: Humphrey Milford–Oxford University Press, 1922), pp. 208–29.

82. JAMES PEGGS—‘Suttees’, from India’s Cries to British Humanity, 2nd edn. (London, Seely and Son, 1830), pp. 1–9, 11–34, 51–62, 79–111.

83. Extracts from Parliamentary Papers, paper 178 (1830), 7–22, 31–3, 121–2, 130–2, 214–15, 223–9, 231–8, 246, 251, 255–60, 271–5.

84. Extract (on the Bentinck Regulation) from Parliamentary Papers, paper 550 (1830), 4–6.

85. ‘The Late Suttee’, The Friend of India, 11 Oct. 1838, 581.

86. J. R. ADDISON—‘A Suttee’, Bentley's Miscellany, July 1842, 185–8.

87. R. HARTLEY KENNEDY—‘The Suttee: The Narrative of an Eye-witness’, Bentley’s Miscellany, Mar. 1843, 241–56.

88. FANNY PARKES—‘The Suttee’, from Wanderings of a Pilgrim in Search of the Picturesque (London: P. Richardson, 1850), Vol. I, pp. 91–6.

89. EDWARD THOMPSON—‘Was Suttee Voluntary?’, ‘Attempts at Prohibition’, ‘Prohibition in British India’, ‘Concluding Considerations’ from Suttee: A Historical and Philosophical Inquiry (London: George Allen, 1928), pp. 52–81, 129–44.

Volume IV: Education

90. ‘Native Female Education’, Calcutta Gazette 2 May 1825. In The Days of John Company: Selections from the Calcutta Gazette 1824–1832, compiled and edited by Anil Chandra Das (1959), p. 71.

91. ‘Female Education’, The Friend of India, 27 July 1837, 234–5.

92. PRISCILLA CHAPMAN—Extract from Hindoo Female Education (1839), pp. 85–97.

93. ‘Native Female Education’: Review of Alexander Duff’s The Life and Happy Death of Charlotte Green, a Poor Orphan and Edward Storrow’s The Eastern Lily Gathered, Calcutta Review, 25 (1855), 61–77, 88–94.

94. MARY CARPENTER—Extract from On Female Education in India (London: W. W. Head, 1868), pp. 1–16.

95. WILLIAM G. MALLETT—‘A Few Thoughts about Female Education’, The Indian Female Evangelist, 1875, 352–6.

96. MRS [MARTHA] WEITBRECHT—Extract from The Women of India and Christian Work in the Zenana (London: James Nisbet & Co., 1875), pp. 83–92.

97. ‘Notes on Education’, The Indian Female Evangelist, Jan.–Apr. 1879, 260–6.

98. THOMAS SMITH—‘Zenana Schools’ The Indian Female Evangelist, Jan.–Oct. 1881, 2–4.

99. M. SOLAIMAN—‘The Education of Moslem Girls’, Anti-Slavery Reporter, Sept.–Oct. 1889, 229–30.

100. MONIER WILLIAMS—‘Co-ordinate Education in its Bearing on the Present Condition of the Women of India’, Indian Female Evangelist, Jan. 1880, 4–11.

101. EDWARD NICHOLSON—‘The Education of Indian Women’, Calcutta Review, Jan. 1880, 517–32.

102. MISS DAEUBLE—‘The Vicissitudes of a School for Mohammedan Girls’, India’s Women, Apr. 1892, 165–6.

103. MISS ADAMS—‘The Widows’ Training Class’, India’s Women, Mar. 1893, 114–16

104. ‘North India School of Medicine for Christian Women’, India’s Women, Apr. 1895, 149–55.

105. ‘The Education of Indian Girls’, The Indian Magazine and Review, Mar. 1907, 73–6.

106. ARTHUR MAYHEW—‘Female Education’, Report on Education in H.H. the Nizam’s Dominions and Proposals for its Reorganisation (Bombay: The Times Press, 1913), 201–22.

107. ANNIE BESANT—‘Girls’ Education’, The Birth of New India (Adyar, Madras: Theosophical Publishing House, 1917), pp. 157–62.

108. ANNIE BESANT—‘The Education of Indian Girls’, The Birth of New India (Adyar, Madras: Theosophical Publishing House, 1917), pp. 149–56.

109. ‘The Beginnings of Female Education’, Bureau of Education, India, Selections from Education Records, Part II, 1840–1859, ed. J. A. Richey (Calcutta: Superintendent, Government Printing, 1922), pp. 32–6, 39–63.

110. ‘The Education of Women’, from Calcutta University Commission 1917–1919, Vol. IV, XXX B1 (Calcutta: Calcutta University Commission, 1919), pp. 364–73.

111. ‘The Education of Girls and Women’, from Calcutta University Commission, 1917–1919, Vol. II XIB, (‘Education of Girls and Women’) (Calcutta: Calcutta University Commission, 1919), pp. 1–36.

112. ‘Draft Scheme for the Establishment of a Zanana School for Orthodox Hindu Girls’, from Calcutta University Commission, 1917–1919, Vol. IV, Appendix VII (submitted to the Calcutta University Commission by the Lady Principal of the Diocesan College, Calcutta) (Calcutta: Calcutta University Commission, 1919), pp. 86–90.

113. ‘Female Education’, from Travancore Administration Report 1927–1928 (72nd annual report) (Trivandrum: Superintendent, Government Press, 1929), pp. 185–7.

114. ‘The Education of Indian Girls and Women’, from Report on the Progress of Education in Bihar and Orissa for the Years 1927–28 (Patna: Superintendent, Government Printing, 1928), pp. 34–6.

115. ‘Home Science Training’, ‘Conclusion’, ‘Home Science’, from ‘All India Women’s Education Fund Association’, Report of the Special Committee (All India Women’s Education Fund Association, 1930), 14, 29–35.

116. ‘The Emancipation of Women’, ‘Some Special Problems, I: Women’s Education’, from Report of the Commission on Christian Higher Education in India: An Enquiry into the Place of the Christian College in Modern India (Oxford University Press, 1931), pp. 39–40, 250–3, 254–5, 305–7, 310–11.

117. ‘The Education of Indian Girls and Women’, from Government of Bengal, 8th Quinquennial Review on the Progress of Education in Bengal for the Years 1927–1932 (Calcutta: Bengal Secretariat Book Depot, 1933), pp. 67–9, 72–8, 12–13.

118. Extract from Ministry of Education, Central Bureau of Education, Progress of Education in India, 1937–47: Decennial Review, Vol. 1 (Ministry of Education, Central Bureau of Education, 1947), pp. 12–13.

119. SARAH TUCKER—‘Central School for Native Girls’, from South Indian Sketches (London: James Nisbet, 1842–3), Vol. I, pp. 73–84.

120. SARAH TUCKER—‘Female Schools’, from South Indian Sketches (London: James Nisbet, 1842–3), Vol. II, pp. 131–53.

Volume V: Health and Marriage

121. ‘Parsi Marriages’, from Erskine Perry, Cases Illustrative of Oriental Life, Decided in HM Supreme Court at Bombay. The Application of English Law to India (1853), pp. 57–72.

122. ‘Indian Marriage Ceremonies’, The London Journal, 11 Aug. 1860, 509–10.

123. ‘Indian Marriage Customs’, The London Reader, 13 June 1863, 156–7.

124. W. J. ELMSLIE—‘On Female Medical Missions to India’, The Indian Female Evangelist, 15 Jan. 1873, 193–206.

125. LOUISA CLAYTON—‘Twofold Healing for the Women of India’, The Indian Female Evangelist, Jan.–Apr. 1879, 202–10.

126. ‘The Indian Christian Marriage Act, 1872’, The Calcutta Review, Jan. 1875, 1–20.

127. C. R. FRANCIS—‘Medical Missions to the Women of India’, The Indian Female Evangelist, Jan.–Oct. 1881, 150–4.

128. WILLIAM ARTHUR—‘Woman’s Work in India: Medical Missions’, The Wesleyan-Methodist Magazine, June 1882, 438–45.

129. ‘Of Offences Relating to Marriage’, from The Anglo-Indian Codes, Vol. 1 (Substantive Law) (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1887), pp. 281–4.

130. ‘Infant Marriages in India’, The Sentinel, Nov. 1889, 130–1.

131. J. D. REES—‘Meddling with Hindu Marriages’, The Nineteenth Century, Oct. 1890, 660–76.

132. ‘Current Opinion on Child-marriage and Widowhood in India’, The Sentinel, Dec. 1890, 141–2.

133. ‘Infant Marriage and Enforced Widowhood in India’, The Sentinel, Sept. 1890, 101–2.

134. H. H. RISLEY—‘Hindu Infant Marriage’, Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine, Dec. 1890, 785–97.

135. ‘Indian Marriage Reform’, The Review of Reviews, Nov. 1890, 448.

136. MILLICENT GARRETT FAWCETT—‘Infant Marriage in India’, The Contemporary Review, Nov. 1890, 712–20.

137. FREDERIC PINCOTT—‘The Hindu Marriage Agitation’, The National Review, Apr. 1891, 179–94.

138. C. N. BARHAM—‘Child Marriage in India’, Westminster Review, Jan. 1891, 113–23.

139. MARCUS B. FULLER—‘Child-marriage’ and ‘Enforced Widowhood’, from The Wrongs of Indian Womanhood (New York: Caxton, 1900), pp. 38–73.

140. ‘Public Health and Vital Statistics’, from The Imperial Gazetteer of India. The Indian Empire, Vol. I (‘Descriptive’) (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1907), pp. 506–13, 516–17.

141. ‘The Hindu Widows’ Home, Poona’, The Indian Magazine and Review, Oct. 1908, 267–71.

142. ‘Hindu Widowhood’, The Commonweal, 7 Aug. 1914, 107–8.

143. JOHAN VAN MANEN—‘The Post-puberty Marriage Problem’, The Commonweal, 5 Mar. 1915, 29–31.

144. S. Z. LAZARUS—‘Reform for Indian Women’, The Commonweal, 5 Mar. 1915, 31–2.

145. ANNIE BESANT—‘Widow-Remarriage’, from The Birth of New India (Adyar, Madras: Theosophical Publishing House, 1917), pp. 299–302.

146. Extract from Souvenir of the Maternity and Infant Welfare Exhibition, Delhi 1920 (Calcutta: Government Printing, 1920), pp. 1–10.

147. Speech of the Earl of Reading at Laying of the Foundation Stone of the Lady Reading Hospital at ‘Bairdville’, Simla on the 15th June 1923. In Speeches of the Earl of Reading, Vol. II (‘From 15th June 1923 to 1st April 1926’) (Simla: Government of India Press, 1926), pp. 1–5.

148. Speech of the Earl of Reading at the Opening of the Lady Reading hospital for Women and Children at Simla on the 25th April 1924. In Speeches of the Earl of Reading, Vol. II (‘From 15th June 1923 to 1st April 1926’) (Simla: Government of India Press, 1926), pp. 182–5.

149. ‘J. E. WOOLACOTT—Child Marriage and Physical Welfare’, from Britain’s Record in India (London: Whitefriars, 1927), pp. 66–8.

150. ‘Health Organization for Women in India’, from Office of the Women’s Medical Service, League of Nations, Health Organization, Health Organisation in British India (1928), pp. 76–92.

151. Extracts from Directorate of Public Health, Public Health Code (Madras: Superintendent, Government Press, 1928), pp. 1–7, 11–13, 15–16, 42–5.

152. Extracts from Age of Consent Committee, Vol. 1 (‘Oral Evidence and Written Statements of Witnesses from the Punjab, North West Frontier Province and Delhi’) (Calcutta: Government of India, Central Publications Branch, 1929), ‘Questionnaire’, pp. xvii–xix.

153. Extracts from Age of Consent Committee, Vol. 1 (‘Oral Evidence and Written Statements of Witnesses from the Punjab, North West Frontier Province and Delhi’) (Calcutta: Government of India, Central Publications Branch, 1929), pp. 206–9, 232–3, 372–5, 391, 440–3, 510–15.

154. Extracts from Age of Consent Committee. Evidence 1928–1929, Vol. 2 (‘Oral Evidence and Written Statements of Witnesses from the Bombay Presidency (Karachi and Ahmedabad)’) (Calcutta: Government of India, Central Publications Branch, 1929), pp. 131–4, 448–9.

155. Extracts from Age of Consent Committee. Evidence 1928–1929, Vol. 3 (‘Oral Evidence and Written Statements of Witnesses from the Bombay Presidency (Continued—Bombay and Poona) and the Central Provinces and Berar’) (Calcutta: Government of India, Central Publications Branch, 1929), pp. 27–8, 29–37, 404–8, 520–3, 683–4.

156. Extracts from Age of Consent Committee. Evidence 1928–1929, Vol. 4 (‘Oral Evidence and Written Statements of Witnesses from the Madras Presidency’) (Calcutta: Government of India, Central Publications Branch, 1929), pp. 430–1, 434–5, 442–3, 570–1.

157. Extracts from Age of Consent Committee. Evidence 1928–1929, Vol. 5 (‘Witnesses from the Madras Presidency (Ootacamund, Calicut, Madura and Vizagapatnam and Coorg)’) (Calcutta: Government of India, Central Publications Branch, 1929), pp. 255–61, 325–7.

158. Extract from Age of Consent Committee. Evidence 1928–1929, Vol. 6 (‘Witnesses from the Bengal Presidency’) (Calcutta: Government of India, Central Publications Branch, 1929), pp. 218–21.

159. Extracts from Age of Consent Committee. Evidence 1928–29, Vol. 9 (‘Oral Evidence and Written Statements of Witnesses from (United Provinces Continued) Lucknow and Ajmer-Merwara’) (Calcutta: Government of India, Central Publications Branch, 1929), pp. 52–61, 74–9, 124–8.

160. Extracts from Report of the Age of Consent Committee 1928–1929 (Calcutta: Government of India, Central Publications Branch, 1929), pp. 16–91, 99–121, 156–71, 196–201.

161. C. F. STRICKLAND—‘Child-Marriages in India’ The English Review, May 1930, 600–11.

162. ‘Questionnaire: Legal Protection of Female Workers’, Journal of the Association of Medical Women in India, Feb. 1931, 70–3.

163. Extract from Annual Clinical Report of the Government Hospital for Women and Children, Egmore, Madras, for the Year 1931 (Madras: Superintendent, Government Press, 1932), pp. 1–7.

164. R. YOUNG—‘Modern Developments and Possibilities in Public Health Work for Medical Women in India’, Journal of the Association of Medical Women in India, May 1932, 54–6.

165. M. I. BALFOUR—‘Indian Women In Industry’, Part I, Journal of the Association of Medical Women in India, 20, 4, 1932, 5–17.

166. The Indian Red Cross Society, Annual Report (1932), 21–4.

167. M. I. BALFOUR—‘The Problems of Medical Women in India’, Journal of the Association of Medical Women in India, May 1933, 5–10.

168. ‘Questionnaire No. 1: Birth Control’, Journal of the Association of Medical Women in India, 1933, 71–80.

169. JEAN MACLEAN—‘Opening Address at the Medical Women’s Postgraduate Course’ Calcutta, 26 June 1933, Journal of the Association of Medical Women in India, Nov. 1933, 5–12.

170. M. I. BALFOUR—‘Indian Women in Industry’, Part II, Journal of the Association of Medical Women in India, 21, 1, 1933, 5–15.

171. JOHN LAW—‘Marriage and Women’, from Glimpses of Hidden India (Calcutta: Thacker, Spink & Co.), pp. 145–53.

172. Extract from The Seventy-ninth Annual Report of the Committee of the British Indian Association for the Year 1930–31 (Calcutta: S. C. Dutt, 1931), pp. 55–8.

173. ‘The Hindu Widows’ Right of Maintenance Bill, 1933’, The Eighty-second Annual Report of the Committee of the British Indian Association for the Year 1933–34 (Calcutta: S. C. Dutt, 1934), pp. 88–9.

174. ‘The Girls’ Protection Bill, 1933’, ‘The Suppression of the Traffic in Women and Children’, ‘Hindu Child Marriage Bill’, from The Eighty-third Annual Report of the Committee of the British Indian Association for the Year 1934–35 (Calcutta: S. C. Dutt, 1935), pp. 46–7, 60–3, 122–5.

175. R. J. MINNEY—‘Sex’, from India Marches Past ( London: Jarrolds, 1935), pp. 201–25.

176. ‘Hindu Polygamous Marriage Restraint Bill’, ‘Polygamous Marriage Regulating Bill’, ‘Hindu Women’s Right to Divorce Bill’, ‘The Case of the Widow-landlord’, from The Eighty-seventh Annual Report of the Committee of the British Indian Association for the Year 1938–39 (Calcutta: S. C. Dutt, 1939), pp. 200–3, 212–17, 287–9, 316–17.

177. Extracts from Annual Report of Public Health, Sindh (1939), pp. 33, 47–9.

178. ‘Rules of the National Association for Supplying Medical Aid by Women to the Women of India’, 55th Annual Report for the Year 1940. The National Association for Supplying Medical Aid by Women to the Women of India. The Countess of Dufferin’s Fund. Madras Branch (Madras: Superintendent, Government Press, 1941), pp. 11–12.

179. ‘Nursing Standards in India’, Journal of the Association of Medical Women in India, Feb. 1941, 223–8.

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