Women in Love [NOOK Book]

Overview

Women in Love by D. H. Lawrence is the
perfect high quality mobile reader
publication for those who are fans of
D. H. Lawrence and also those who are
discovering his writings for the first
time.
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Women in Love

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Overview

Women in Love by D. H. Lawrence is the
perfect high quality mobile reader
publication for those who are fans of
D. H. Lawrence and also those who are
discovering his writings for the first
time.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940013546752
  • Publisher: Puget Empire Publishing, LP
  • Publication date: 11/27/2011
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 598 KB

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 87 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(24)

4 Star

(17)

3 Star

(23)

2 Star

(8)

1 Star

(15)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 88 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 29, 2001

    An endless human cycle

    Women in Love by D. H. Lawrence is a sequel, but knowledge of The Rainbow is not necessary to appreciate the second novel. The title is somewhat misleading, as it is really about women and men, men and women, and men and men¿and it's not always clear with what they are in love. It is the tale of two teachers, sisters Gudrun and Ursula Brangwen, the son of the local mine owner, Gerald Crich, and school inspector Rupert Birkin. Their complex relationships start to take shape the day of Gerald's sister's wedding, as Gudrun and Gerald and Ursula and Rupert are drawn together, often despite themselves. The Gudrun/Gerald relationship becomes a series of conflicts that are won only temporarily and that lead to more conflicts and then temporary reprieves of tenderness and sex. His emotional conflicts with Gudrun are mirrored in Gerald's dealings with animals; he brutally forces his mare to stay at a railroad crossing despite her terror until blood is drawn and until the cars have passed. Later, when his sister's rabbit resists being picked up so he can be sketched, Gerald punches him in the head so he will submit instantly. His blind will must triumph in all. The only time that he and Gudrun seem to find an equilibrium is when they balance each other by accepting but not gravitating toward each other. It becomes a tenuous relatonship at best and a dangerous one at worst. Gerald is incapable of love, as is his brooding mother. Meanwhile, Ursula finds herself in a different kind of battle, with Rupert and his self-contemptous philosophies about relationships, death, and the will. His vision of love, if he even believes it exists, is of two planets circling one another in perfect equilibrium. He did not find that with his former lover Hermione, who does not satisfy his physical desires and who does not calibrate with his spiritual needs. At the end of the novel, he reinforces what he has said all along¿his love will always have a missing component and be incomplete without it. As a side note, Rupert seems to be Lawrence's own mouthpiece, reflecting many of his own views. As with Lady Chatterley's lover, the setting for Women in Love becomes a character¿the grimy village, the sordid town, the sullen miners and their wives provide a backdrop of inevitable modernization and dehumanization that counterbalances the individual stories. As mining is mechanized to death, so is the human soul. The will either accepts the inevitable crush of the modern world or fights it to the death. The weakest part of Women in Love may be when the setting changes, that is, when the couples decide to leave all that England has become and to take their relationships and their futures to the Alps, where they find art truly does imitate life with its mechanism. The novel seems to lose a little of its footing at this point, giving in to its tendency to become an intellectual exercise in the arts rather than a human story in a regimented world. Women in Love starts out slowly, as a lengthy series of vignettes and conversations that seem unlikely or unrealistic, but develops a crescendo as the battles begin. In the end, despite dramatic events and drastic changes, the conundrums remain, and even Ursula's persistence and will cannot eliminate them now, let alone forever. Women in Love is about destruction and regeneration in an endless cycle and the human under the surface that we are not entirely aware of and cannot express.

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 24, 2002

    More aptly titled "What is Love?"

    It is hard to give a definite thumbs-up or thumbs-down to this this story. On the one hand, it is very disjointed. It is filled with many long inner monologues that have no relationship with each other. The ending is bizarre and unsatisfying. On the other hand, the writing is brilliant and beautiful. When there is diaglogue and interaction between the characters, the story comes back to life. The study of human nature, and the differences in what all people (not just men vs. women) want in love is very insightful. It is certainly not a book for everyone.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 15, 2000

    Confusing

    This book is confusing from the first page and up. I read it for school and I don't recomend it to anyone in high school. The main character in this book is strange and doesn't know what he wants , I found myself angry every time I read it.

    4 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 17, 2001

    Lawrence thinks ahead of his time

    By far what I found most interesting about this novel was the relationship between Gerald and Birkin. These two men are involved in an emotional dependency...that sometimes verges on erotic...but they are unsure of what do do with their feelings, in light of social propriety and the current age in which they live. The last two pages of the novel, to me, make the book worth reading. It totally sums up the entire book in a seemingly simple conversation between Birkin and his wife Ursula. Why shouldn't he be allowed a different kind of love? Why isn't this the way? Why is it considered unnatural? Makes you think.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 30, 2014

    Dated and to my taste tedious

    I am not a fan of his at the best of times and the three is for classic literature that was once coniidered daring and rated x and banned in boston m.a.@sparta

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 19, 2014

    AspenFeather

    She walked over and laied with him

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 19, 2014

    Faloneye

    Hello. He lied down. Care to join me?

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 21, 2012

    Makes you think

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted April 14, 2011

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    Posted May 18, 2011

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    Posted May 26, 2010

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    Posted July 14, 2011

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    Posted May 12, 2012

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 17, 2010

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    Posted May 19, 2013

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 10, 2010

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 3, 2010

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 30, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 26, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 10, 2010

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