Women, Money, and the Law: Nineteenth-Century Fiction, Gender, and the Courts [NOOK Book]

Overview

Did 19th-century American women have money of their own? To answer this question, Women, Money, and the Law looks at the public and private stories of individual women within the context of American culture, assessing how legal and cultural traditions affected women's lives, particularly with respect to class and racial differences, and analyzing the ways in which women were involved in economic matters. Joyce Warren has uncovered a vast, untapped archive of legal documents from the New York Supreme Court that ...
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Women, Money, and the Law: Nineteenth-Century Fiction, Gender, and the Courts

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Overview

Did 19th-century American women have money of their own? To answer this question, Women, Money, and the Law looks at the public and private stories of individual women within the context of American culture, assessing how legal and cultural traditions affected women's lives, particularly with respect to class and racial differences, and analyzing the ways in which women were involved in economic matters. Joyce Warren has uncovered a vast, untapped archive of legal documents from the New York Supreme Court that had been expunged from the official record. By exploring hundreds of court cases involving women litigants between 1845 and 1875--women whose stories had, in effect, been erased from history--and by studying the lives and works of a wide selection of 19th-century women writers, Warren has found convincing evidence of women's involvement with money. The court cases show that in spite of the most egregious gender restrictions of law and custom, many 19th-century women lived independently, coping with the legal and economic restraints of their culture while making money for themselves and often for their families as well. They managed their lives and their money with courage and tenacity and fractured constructed gender identities by their lived experience. Many women writers, even when they did not publicly advocate economic independence for women, supported themselves and their families throughout their writing careers and in their fiction portrayed the importance of money in women's lives. Women from all backgrounds--some defeated through ignorance and placidity, others as ruthless and callous as the most hardened businessmen--were in fact very much a part of the money economy. Together, the evidence of the court cases and the writers runs counter to the official narrative, which scripted women as economically dependent and financially uninvolved. Warren provides an illuminating counternarrative that significantly questions contemporary assumptions about the lives of 19th-century women. Women, Money, and the Law is an important corrective to the traditional view and will fascinate scholars and students in women's studies, literary studies, and legal history as well as the general reader.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781587296505
  • Publisher: University of Iowa Press
  • Publication date: 9/1/2009
  • Series: NONE Series
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 384
  • Sales rank: 1,225,984
  • File size: 659 KB

Meet the Author

Joyce Warren is a professor of American literature and director of women's studies at Queens College, City University of New York. She is the author of Fanny Fern: An Independent Woman and The American Narcissus: Individualism and Women in Nineteenth-Century American Fiction. She has edited Ruth Hall and Other Writings by Fanny Fern and The (Other) American Traditions: Nineteenth-Century Women Writers and co-edited Challenging Boundaries: Gender and Periodization.
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Table of Contents

Introduction : fracturing gender 1
1 Marriage and money : Trust v. Trust 19
2 The dominant discourse : compulsory dependency 44
3 Economics and the American renaissance woman : Warner, Southworth, Stowe, Cummins, & Fern 75
4 The woman plaintiff 115
5 The economics of race : Harper, Wilson, Crafts, & Jacobs 154
6 The woman defendant 185
7 Economics and the law in fiction : Fern, Tyler, Oakes Smith, Chesebro', Phelps, Stoddard, Child, Davis, Ruiz de Burton, & Winnemucca Hopkins 216
8 The economics of divorce 243
9 Woman's economic independence : Fern, Alcott, & Gilman 280
Epilogue : into the twenty-first century 302
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