Women of Colonial America

Women of Colonial America

by Jana Voelke Studelska
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Women from England were recruited to help develop the New World. They raised food for their families, made their own cloth, and educated their children. They endured incredibly harsh times in order to establish what would become one of the greatest nations in the world—the United States of America. As long as they did their chores and obeyed their husbands,

…  See more details below

Overview

Women from England were recruited to help develop the New World. They raised food for their families, made their own cloth, and educated their children. They endured incredibly harsh times in order to establish what would become one of the greatest nations in the world—the United States of America. As long as they did their chores and obeyed their husbands, they were respected in the colonies. But some women didn’t always follow the rules.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Elizabeth D. Schafer
Featuring primarily white English colonists, mostly settlers in New England, this history does not portray the ethnic and religious diversity of colonial women nor depict fully their vibrant roles in early American history. Emphasizing service, the narrative describes women's religious, domestic, and social concerns and duties. Brief references to slavery are not elaborated to explore how African-American women, both enslaved and free, experienced colonial life. Nor is indentured servitude, which many colonial women endured in exchange for transportation, examined in detail. Several women profiled suffered punitive actions for their independent spiritual beliefs. Although New Netherlands is mentioned in discussion of Puritan outcast Lady Deborah Moody, the book overlooks the variety of European colonial immigrants, such as Jamestown's Polish settlers or Scandinavians establishing New Sweden. Discussion of Native American women is limited to Pocahontas, who was atypical compared to Nancy Ward and other female Indian leaders, who often lived in matriarchal societies. Incorporation of quotations expressing perspectives about such intriguing colonial women as Margaret Brent, Elizabeth Drinker, and Sarah Osborn as they shaped colonial history instead of mainly framing the book based on males' achievements and comments would have strengthened this book. The author's use of the modern word "teenager" is jarring. Read with Jane Kamensky's The Colonial Mosaic: American Women 1600-1760 (1995). A part of the "We the People" series.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780756524579
Publisher:
Capstone Press
Publication date:
01/01/2007
Series:
We the People: Exploration and Colonization Series
Pages:
24
Sales rank:
1,184,973
Product dimensions:
7.70(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.30(d)
Lexile:
890L (what's this?)
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >