Women of Sand and Myrrh: A Novel

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Overview

A powerful and moving novel, by the Arab worlds  leading woman novelist, about four women coping  with the insular, oppressive society of an unnamed  desert state.

Little is known of what life is like for contemporary Arab women living in the Middle East. One of the few literary voices speaking out from that still closed society is Hanan al-Shaykh, whose novel The Story of Zahra was banned in most Arab countries. Now available for the ...

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Women of Sand and Myrrh: A Novel

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Overview

A powerful and moving novel, by the Arab worlds  leading woman novelist, about four women coping  with the insular, oppressive society of an unnamed  desert state.

Little is known of what life is like for contemporary Arab women living in the Middle East. One of the few literary voices speaking out from that still closed society is Hanan al-Shaykh, whose novel The Story of Zahra was banned in most Arab countries. Now available for the first time in the U.S. is her newest novel, a story of four women treated to every luxury but freedom.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"A gifted and  courageous writer."—Middle Eastern  International
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Four intertwined first-person narratives use poetic language to paint a hard-edged picture of an unnamed wealthy Arab desert country full of luxurious houses hidden behind high walls and women hidden behind veils. These women cannot drive or travel abroad without their husbands' permission, but they find small outlets that permit them to survive psychologically. An outstanding translation renders al-Shaykh's prose into fluid and elegant English. Suha is a Lebanese woman who has come to the desert with her young son because of her husband's job. Intelligent and educated, she finds both the heat and the culture stifling, and a sexual encounter with her friend Nur only adds to her discomfort and loss of identity. Nur reacts to the protected lifestyle she has enjoyed since birth by becoming spoiled and superficial, even demanding an abortion because she is unwilling to sacrifice her fashionable wardrobe. Suzanne, an American, has also followed her husband and his work, but once in the Arab country she becomes involved with an Arab man who calls her ``the Marilyn Monroe of the desert.'' He worships her until the day she expresses interest in her own sexual pleasure, at which point he accuses her of being a hermaphrodite. Tamr makes her first tiny steps towards independence by attending the Gulf Institute for Women and Girls, where Suha teaches. Tamr comes home with amazing stories for her mother about the oddities she finds there, like ``the American who went around smoking a cigarette in a holder.'' Al-Shaykh is a native of Lebanon whose sexually explicit The Story of Zahra was banned there. In this novel sex is at once a taboo and a driving force behind the lives of these four women as well as others in the community. Suzanne describes how men seek out women in the supermarket and track cars with unveiled passengers; and a ritual part of Nur's life is using a secret telephone in her bedroom to call a stranger with whom she has erotic conversations. All of the characters live in luxury and privilege but with a poverty of self-expression so chafing that it ultimately compels one of them to flee. (Aug.) .
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780385423588
  • Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 7/28/1992
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 288
  • Sales rank: 824,292
  • Product dimensions: 5.19 (w) x 7.98 (h) x 0.61 (d)

Meet the Author

Hanan Al-Shaykh

HANAN al-SHAYKH was born in Lebanon and brought up in Beirut. Formerly a writer for the prestigious daily Al-Nahar, she is also the author of Women of Sand and Myrrh, The Story of Zahra, Beirut Blues, and, most recently, I Sweep the Sun off Rooftops. She lives in London with her family.

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 16, 2004

    Wonderful Character Study

    Beautifully written, moving character sketch of four women whose growth is stunted. One could easily blame the Middle Eastern culture (I assumed the country they were in was Saudi Arabia), yet one of the women, shallow and aimless, is American and in fact wants to stay in [Saudi Arabia] when her American husband is to return to the U.S. because she enjoys the servants,affluent lifestyle and attention of Arab men starved for a sexually liberated female. I enjoyed the book because of the credibility and skill with which the different characters were portrayed and also because the book was a window for me into life in an Arab culture (about which I know very little). One conclusion I drew was that the more human beings try to repress sexuality, the more driving a force it becomes. Certainly in this puritanical country where the sight of a leg, arm, unveiled face is forbidden, sex nevertheless dominates the interaction between men and women. I say 'human beings' because this book has a universality which transcends time and place. It deserves wider appreciation.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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