Women Who Opt Out: The Debate over Working Mothers and Work-Family Balance [NOOK Book]

Overview

In a much-publicized and much-maligned 2003 New York Times article, “The Opt-Out Revolution,” the journalist Lisa Belkin made the controversial argument that highly educated women who enter the workplace tend to leave upon marrying and having children. Women Who Opt Out is a collection of original essays by the leading scholars in the field of work and family research, which takes a multi-disciplinary approach in questioning the basic thesis of “the opt-out revolution.” The contributors illustrate that the desire...
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Women Who Opt Out: The Debate over Working Mothers and Work-Family Balance

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Overview

In a much-publicized and much-maligned 2003 New York Times article, “The Opt-Out Revolution,” the journalist Lisa Belkin made the controversial argument that highly educated women who enter the workplace tend to leave upon marrying and having children. Women Who Opt Out is a collection of original essays by the leading scholars in the field of work and family research, which takes a multi-disciplinary approach in questioning the basic thesis of “the opt-out revolution.” The contributors illustrate that the desire to balance both work and family demands continues to be a point of unresolved concern for families and employers alike and women’s equity within the workforce still falls behind. Ultimately, they persuasively make the case that most women who leave the workplace are being pushed out by a work environment that is hostile to women, hostile to children, and hostile to the demands of family caregiving, and that small changes in outdated workplace policies regarding scheduling, flexibility, telecommuting and mandatory overtime can lead to important benefits for workers and employers alike. Contributors: Kerstin Aumann, Jamie Dolkas, Ellen Galinsky, Lisa Ackerly Hernandez, Susan J. Lambert, Joya Misra, Maureen Perry-Jenkins, Peggie R. Smith, Pamela Stone, and Joan C. Williams.
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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"This timely book is a significant contribution to the sociology of family and work and gender roles...highly recommended for upper-division undergraduates and above."-CHOICE

“In clear and compelling prose, the essays in this superb collection offer an important corrective to the notion that women freely choose to leave employment. The authors demonstrate instead how significant constraints shape women’s relationships to the labor force and how these constraints vary for women in different social class positions.”-Margaret K. Nelson,Author of Parenting Out of Control: Anxious Parents in Uncertain Times

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780814745069
  • Publisher: New York University Press
  • Publication date: 4/2/2012
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 216
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

Bernie D. Jones is Associate Professor of Law at the Suffolk University Law School and author of Fathers of Conscience: Mixed Race Inheritance in the Antebellum South.

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Table of Contents

P a r t I . “Opting Out”: Women’s History and Feminist Legal heory
Introduction: Women, Work, and
Motherhood in American History
Bernie D. Jones
P a r t I I . Is “Opting Out” for Real?
1 The Rhetoric and Reality of “Opting Out”:
Toward a Better Understanding of Professional
Women’s Decisions to Head Home
Pamela Stone and Lisa Ackerly Hernandez
2 The Real “Opt-Out Revolution” and
a New Model of Flexible Careers
Kerstin Aumann and Ellen Galinsky
P a r t I I I . Can All Women “Opt In” before hey “Opt Out”?
3 “Opting In” to Full Labor Force Participation in
Hourly Jobs
Susan J. Lambert
4 The Challenges to and Consequences of “Opting Out”
for Low-Wage, New Mothers
Maureen Perry-Jenkins
5 The Future of Family Caregiving: he Value of
Work-Family Strategies hat Beneit Both Care
Consumers and Paid Care Workers
Peggie R. Smithviii |
6 Care Work and Women’s Employment:
A Comparative Perspective
Joya Misra
P a r t I V. Conclusion
7 he Opt-Out Revolution Revisited
Joan C. Williams and Jamie Dolkas
Bibliography
About the Contributors
Index

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