Women, Work and Computerization: Charting a Course to the Future

Overview

This volume contains selected papers from the Seventh International Conference on Women, Work and Computerization (WWC 2000), which provides an interdisciplinary forum for researchers, practitioners and users in the field of information technology. The conference was sponsored by the International Federation for Information Processing (IFIP) and was held in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, in June 2000. Generous support for the publication of the proceedings was provided by ...

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Overview

This volume contains selected papers from the Seventh International Conference on Women, Work and Computerization (WWC 2000), which provides an interdisciplinary forum for researchers, practitioners and users in the field of information technology. The conference was sponsored by the International Federation for Information Processing (IFIP) and was held in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, in June 2000. Generous support for the publication of the proceedings was provided by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.
In this book, the authors discuss how different areas of society are being transformed by computer technology. Authors have placed particular emphasis on women's experiences as computer scientists, and the mechanisms through which approaches to system design and, system design methodologies contribute to the gendered nature of computing. Other areas of emphasis include gender differences in computer use, the use of computers in everyday life, and discussions about the use of computers to promote citizenship. With the move of computers progressively into our homes, authors have increasingly looked at the use of computers to work, and learn, from home.

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Product Details

Meet the Author

Ellen Balka is an Associate Professor in the School of Communication at Simon Fraser University, British Columbia.

Richard Smith is an Assistant Professor of Communication, and Director of the Centre for Policy Research on Science and Technology (CPROST), at Simon Fraser University, British Columbia.

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgements; E. Balka, R. Smith. Introduction; E. Balka. 1: The Absence of Women in Computing. Making the Computer Masculine; E. Van Oost. Do Computers Transform People Into Women and Men? B. Törpel. Net Gains; R. Pringle, S. Nielsen, L. Von Hellens, A. Greenhill, L. Parfitt. Women And Computing; D. Ramanee Peiris, P. Gregor, Indigo V. 2: Training and Careers. The Globalization Of Gender in IT; M. Suriya, A. Panteli. Women in Computer Science; I. Miliszewska, J. Horwood. Gender Differences in Vancouver Secondary Students; V. Chan, K. Stafford, M. Klawe, G. Chen. Why I.T. Doesn't Appeal to Young Women; J. Symonds. Computer Self Efficacy and Gender; A. Durndell, Z. Haag, D. Asenova, H. Laithwaite. Where Are They At With IT? A. Craig, A. Stein. ARC; M. Klawe, I. Cavers, F. Popowich, G. Chen. 3: The Nuts and Bolts of System Design. Information Systems; A. Adam. Constructing Common Sense; C. Sherron. Masculine World Disguised as Gender Neutral; T. Kuosa. Doubting the Object World; C.K.M. Crutzen, J.F.Gerrissen. Gendered User-Representations; E. Rommes. Information System Development Methodologies; H. Abimbola Soriyan, A. Mursu, M. Korpela. Will ETs Understand Us If They Make Contact? E. Turner, L. Stepulevage. 4: Gender Differences in Computer Use. Considering the Gender of Your Web Audience; J. Fisher, A. Craig. Gender Differences in Web Navigation; S. Mcdonald, L. Spencer. Women in Computer-Mediated Discussions; C. Owen. 5: Citizenship. Electronic Democracy; P. Roberts. Discourses and Cracks; A. Ekelin, P. Elovaara. Local Interpretations of Information Technology; S. Tuuva. Courting Women E-Com; L. Regan Shade. 6: Computers in Everyday Life. Negotiating Time and Space for Every-Day Pleasure; E. Green. Young Girls On the Internet; T. Håpnes, B. Rasmussen. New Technology Increasing Old Inequality? T. Håpnes, B. Rasmussen. 7: Women and Work. Squeezing Librarians Out Of The Middle; R. Harris. Sleep in a Sleepless Age? A. Pugh. 'My Home Workplace is My Castle'; C. Fulton. The Cottage or the Sweatshop? S. Bryant. Small Business Use of Electronic Networks; L. Wood. 8: The Use of Computers in Education. Feminist Pedagogy and the Lap Top Computer; P. Chegwidden. Education On-Line: What's In It For Women? H.J. Richardson, S. French.

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