Women Writers and Public Debate in 17th Century Britain

Overview

This book reveals that seventeenth-century women's very marginality to traditional institutions of church and state made them catalysts for imagining an expanded public culture beyond these institutions. Women authors such as the conduct writer Dorothy Leigh, the prophet Sarah Wight, and the poet Katherine Philips recast sites of private dialogue—the extended family, the religious coventicle, and the poetic coterie—as the bases of public debate that crossed national borders. By revealing women writers' key role ...

See more details below
Hardcover (First Edition)
$97.60
BN.com price
(Save 7%)$105.00 List Price
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (8) from $20.54   
  • New (4) from $96.45   
  • Used (4) from $20.54   
Women Writers and Public Debate in 17th Century Britain

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook - Annotated edition)
$85.00
BN.com price

Overview

This book reveals that seventeenth-century women's very marginality to traditional institutions of church and state made them catalysts for imagining an expanded public culture beyond these institutions. Women authors such as the conduct writer Dorothy Leigh, the prophet Sarah Wight, and the poet Katherine Philips recast sites of private dialogue—the extended family, the religious coventicle, and the poetic coterie—as the bases of public debate that crossed national borders. By revealing women writers' key role in the heated controversies of this period, Gray offers a new reading of those struggles as fractured by private affiliation and extended by transnational alliance.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"This impressive monograph is a significant contribution to seventeenth-century studies."—Literature and History

“A book of meticulous scholarship, original insight, and sophisticated argument, Gray’s Women Writers and Public Debate constitutes a major contribution to our understanding of the period of the English Revolution—those decades in the mid-seventeenth-century that saw the proliferation of print and the entry of distinctive women’s voices into print and public debate. Questioning the notion of women as separate subjects and of the private/public divide, she moves us towards a nuanced and powerful understanding of the efficacy of these women in forming ‘counterpublic’ spheres that challenged dominant powers.”—Achsah Guibbory, Barnard College, Columbia University

“In this exciting and well-argued book, Gray shows how literate women who are marginalized in (or altogether absent from) most studies of seventeenth-century English political culture contributed decisively to what Jürgen Habermas controversially called ‘the public sphere.’ Gray’s innovative use the notion of the counterpublic developed by feminist Nancy Fraser invites the reader to historicize and rethink modern ways of distinguishing between—and gendering—public and private domains.”—Margaret

Ferguson, Professor of English, University of California, Davis

“Gray has produced a new and persuasive argument for the significance of mid-17th-century women's writing. She does this with enormous, impressive scholarly detail: showing how across the ideological divisions of the Civil War women exploited and shaped new kinds of public sphere, often in opposition to public authorities. With her subtle insights into the poems, prophesies and treatises of Dorothy Leigh,  Sarah Wight, Katherine Philips, and Ann Bradstreet, Gray makes these writings all the more significant for specialists, students, and general readers alike.”—Nigel Smith, Professor of English, Princeton University

 “In this important book, Gray argues women's centrality to a series of ‘counterpublics’ in which both male and female writers critiqued powerful political and religious trends within seventeenth-century Britain. Chapters on Dorothy Leigh, Sarah Wight, Katherine Philips, and Anne Bradstreet demonstrate the skill and significance of those women's oppositional writing, while a concluding chapter on the Quaker writers Katherine Evans and Sarah Cheevers focuses on the transnational nature of seventeenth-century counterpublics. In thus re-gendering seventeenth-century cultural and literary history, Gray rewrites our field—opening it up to new questions, new meanings.”—Elizabeth H. Hageman, Professor of English, University of New Hampshire

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781403981943
  • Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
  • Publication date: 7/24/2007
  • Series: Early Modern Cultural Studies Series
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 272
  • Product dimensions: 5.78 (w) x 8.60 (h) x 0.92 (d)

Meet the Author

Catharine Gray is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Crossing Borders: From Private Dialogue to Public Debate
• Feeding on the Seed of the Woman: Dorothy Leigh and the Figure of Maternal Dissent
• At 'Liberty to Preach in the Chambers': Sarah Wight, Henry Jessey, and the New-Modeled Community of Saints
• The Knowing Few: Katherine Philips and The Post-Courtly Coterie
• News from the New World: Anne Bradstreet and Pan-Protestant Poetics
• Gathering and Scattering in Katharine Evans and Sarah Cheevers

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)