Womens History of the World

Womens History of the World

by Rosalind Miles
     
 

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"Rosalind Miles has rescued from obscurity women of astonishing ability, courage and determination. . . . An exuberant book, written in a jazzy, colorful style sizzling with puns and startling images."--Washington Post Book World See more details below

Overview

"Rosalind Miles has rescued from obscurity women of astonishing ability, courage and determination. . . . An exuberant book, written in a jazzy, colorful style sizzling with puns and startling images."--Washington Post Book World

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
A woman led the storming of the Bastille; in fact, women in the French Revolution played prominent roles as agitators, revolutionaries and intellectuals. Yet history books written by men, as Miles ( The Fiction of Sex , etc.) observes, generally omit or downplay women's contributions. Providing a valuable counterbalance to conventional chronicles, this world history from a feminist perspective is eminently readable, provocative and full of fresh insights. Miles traces the decline of women's status, from the fall of the Great Mother cult, which flourished for perhaps 40,000 years, to the 20th century-mass media's role as an instrument of dominance, ``keeping women in line and training them to be everything a regular guy could ever hope for.'' She believes it is no coincidence that the witchcraft hysteria that swept medieval Europe paralleled an upsurge of women's political power. While making no pretense at comprehensiveness, Miles gives full play to the contemporary struggle for women's rights and the double burden women face as domestic nurturers and workers. Author tour. (Apr.)
Library Journal - Library Journal
It seems late to dedicate a book to ``the women of the world who have no history.'' For 20 years, a constantly increasing surge of scholarship has discovered, recorded, and interpreted the history of women in no uncertain terms. Miles's angry, sweeping text might have been excused in the 1960s, but today it is hard to justify. She concentrates on women as abject victims; she says little about their achievements, nor does she allow them responsibility for either empire or revolution. Blithely, she ignores class in her generalizations. Some feminists, certainly, will wince at the violence of her allusions to a ``feminist hit-list'' and ``feminist freethinkers'' who ``closed in fiercely for the kill.'' Not recommended.-- Mary Drake McFeely, Univ. of Georgia Libs., Athens

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780881623482
Publisher:
Salem House Publishers
Publication date:
04/01/1989
Edition description:
1st American ed
Pages:
294

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