Wonder: When and Why the World Appears Radiant

Wonder: When and Why the World Appears Radiant

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by Paul R. Fleischman
     
 

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What do a marigold, starlight over South Africa, and the birth of a child have in common?

Every person, plant, and star springs up from information compounded by interaction.

We are embedded in an ancient, intricate world. Changing combinations of atoms pass

through the long filter of history and natural law, to form planet Earth, whales, and our

own thoughts.

Overview

What do a marigold, starlight over South Africa, and the birth of a child have in common?

Every person, plant, and star springs up from information compounded by interaction.

We are embedded in an ancient, intricate world. Changing combinations of atoms pass

through the long filter of history and natural law, to form planet Earth, whales, and our

own thoughts. Based on the growth of evidence explaining how the world is put together,

we have become the first generation to have a narrative that unites electron motion to

our breath, and that connects hydrogen fusion in the sun to the energy that powers our

own minds. We can describe how the proteins in our mitochondria pinch and place into

perfect position metal ions that were forged in exploding stars. We cohere for a moment,

suspended between information, order, and transformation of all things.

This book is a scientific and literary exploration of those discoveries that reveal our

deepest identity. Through our urge to understand and communicate, we have uncovered

new meanings that infuse our days with wonder.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781937650230
Publisher:
Small Batch Books
Publication date:
07/09/2013
Pages:
388
Sales rank:
593,057
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.86(d)

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Wonder: When and Why the World Appears Radiant 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Asks important questions in a self-important way. "[N]ot a mere science book." The title and subtitle more than drew me to the book but weren't enough to get me through the whole thing.
AnnMassey More than 1 year ago
What is this life if, full of care, We have no time to stand and stare. No time to stand beneath the boughs And stare as long as sheep or cows. No time to see, when woods we pass, Where squirrels hide their nuts in grass. No time to see, in broad daylight, Streams full of stars, like skies at night. No time to turn at Beauty's glance, And watch her feet, how they can dance. No time to wait till her mouth can Enrich that smile her eyes began. A poor life this if, full of care, We have no time to stand and stare.
Emory More than 1 year ago
‘Wonder’ Unveils Piece By Piece the World We Inhabit And Where We Fit In Creation I never expect a scholar to be a good writer but Paul R. Fleischman is not only good but creative and at times witty. But, more important, he is an inspiring writer, sound and independent thinker. Fleischman, author of several books and articles in scholarly journals, has recently published “Wonder: When and Why the World Appears Radiant.” Relying on biology, chemistry, physics and math, Dr. Fleischman explains why we should view the universe and ourselves with wonder and tells why each one of us – if we truly want to – can experience a sense of wonder each day of our life. We learn from Dr. Fleischman that wonder combines the science, poetry and spirituality that are contained within the big questions we all ask about what life really means. Every individual possesses thoughts, emotions, and feelings of wonder that can be tapped by beautiful language and wise thoughts. What the author wants us to come to realize is that our sense of wonder emerges from the world that creates us. This scholarly book is not an easy one to read but is very much worth making an effort because it contains unique insights and information about ourselves and our world that we have never thought about before. And it is good to ponder new concepts. I avoided rushing through “Wonder” as I might a piece of fiction but instead took my time, read it over a period of four weeks, and focused on what the author wanted me to know. I was rewarded for finishing the book. Examples of the creativity, wit and insights Dr. Fleischman offers includes these samples: • The human mind – even Einstein’s mind – has limits of understanding. We will always remain children in a research library, indirect knowers. • Our new world, like a wool shirt, is sometimes irritating. • Wonder is the word we preserve to refer to events that provoke a deep echo, that make us tremble. Wonder is a signpost at a crossroads. Due to the experience of wonder, we change directions. • It is as if we speak but do not echo. We all are saying something partly known and partly new. In the beginning was the word but we are all new phrases … We are quotes in the latest edition of a newly edited text. • Moby Dick is important to us because it has guts. Wonder is not for weaklings. “Wonder” is a journey through our world in which the author not only provides a roadmap but provides turn-by-turn, step-by-step directions and explanations of how individual components function so that by journey’s end we know far more than we did when taking that first step into our wonder-filled world.