Wooden Churches: A Celebration in Words and Pictures

Overview


Grandpa's daddy raised that house out of his own oaks, pines, and cedars, and then he raised the church. He'd preach in the church on Sunday and the rest of the week he could stand on his own fron porch and have it to look at. --from Losing Battles by Eudora Welty
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Overview


Grandpa's daddy raised that house out of his own oaks, pines, and cedars, and then he raised the church. He'd preach in the church on Sunday and the rest of the week he could stand on his own fron porch and have it to look at. --from Losing Battles by Eudora Welty
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Editorial Reviews

Marjory Raymer
Wooden Churches can be enjoyed one page at a time, with no regard as to what comes before it or after it. The delicately designed book supplies many moments of humor, reflection and artistic enjoyment.
— ForeWord
Library Journal
Intended for mass consumption, this disappointing collection of 152 duotones of simple rural churches is being baldly marketed as the spiritual and commercial successor to the publisher's best-selling Out on the Porch: An Evocation in Words and Pictures (1992). The present formulaic work opens with a feel-good, get-right-with-God childhood reminiscence by journalist Bragg. Predictably, photos by Walker Evans, Gordon Parks, Russell Lee, and others (identified and dated only in the credits at the end) are unnaturally yoked to passages of mostly Southern fiction, with scant sensitivity to context, content, or artistic and authorial intention. While both the photos and the excerpts are evocative on their own, these lightweight, even interchangeable pairings fail to convey the complexities of rural religious expression and architecture. Of limited library appeal beyond compulsory regional interest and small libraries that may lack adequate representation of primary texts and photos.--Russell T. Clement, Univ. of Tennessee Lib., Knoxville Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
Booknews
Passages from American literature are integrated with numerous b&w photographs by the eminent photographer. The subjects are wooden churches (and their congregations) from across the country, and the book evokes a culture that is passing from the American landscape. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781565122338
  • Publisher: Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill
  • Publication date: 11/1/1999
  • Edition description: 1 ED
  • Pages: 122
  • Product dimensions: 8.26 (w) x 8.40 (h) x 0.61 (d)

Meet the Author

Rick Bragg

Rick Bragg is a native of Alabama and a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter for the New York Times. He is the author of the book All Over but the Shoutin'.

Biography

Rick Bragg caught his first break as a journalist when the competition for his first newspaper job decided to stick with his current position in a fast-food restaurant. From there, Bragg has moved from small newspapers in Alabama to the likes of The St. Petersburg Times, the Los Angeles Times and, finally, The New York Times.

He eventually won a reputation in one newsroom as "the misery writer." His assignments: Hurricane Andrew, Miami rioting, Haiti, and Susan Smith, the South Carolina woman accused of drowning her two boys in 1994 by driving her car into a lake. In 1996, while at the Times, Bragg covered the terrorist bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Building in Oklahoma City and won the Pulitzer Prize.

"I've really served at all stations of the cross," Bragg said in a December 2002 interview with Writer magazine. "I've been pretty much everywhere. I don't think there's a difference between writing for a newspaper or magazine and doing a chapter in a book. People who think there is something pedestrian about journalism are just ignorant. The best writers who have put pen to paper have often had a journalism background. There are these boutique writers out there who think if they are not writing their novels sitting at a bistro with their laptops, then they're not real writers. That's ridiculous."

[Bragg left The New York Times in 2003 after questions surfaced regarding his use of uncredited stringers for some of his reporting. Bragg's departure was part of a larger ethics scandal that also claimed the newspaper's top two editors.]

Bragg's memoir, All Over but the Shoutin', recounts these stations, particularly his hardscrabble youth in rural Alabama, where he was brought up by a single mother who sacrificed everything for her children.

"In his sad, beautiful, funny and moving memoir...Rick Bragg gives us a report from the forgotten heart of 'white trash' America, a sort of Pilgrim's Progress or Up from Slavery about how a clever and determined young man outwitted fate," The New York Times Book Review wrote in 1997. "The story he tells, of white suffering and disenfranchisement, is one too seldom heard. It is as if a descendant from one of the hollow-eyed children from Let Us Now Praise Famous Men had stepped out of a photograph to tell his own story, to narrate an experience that even Agee could not penetrate because he was not himself 'trash.' "

In 2001, Bragg went back a generation in his family's story and wrote about his grandfather, a hard-drinking fighter who made whiskey in backwoods stills along the Alabama-Georgia border and died at 51. His widow would rebuff her grandchildren's questions about remarrying: "No, hon, I ain't gonna get me no man...I had me one."

The Los Angeles Times called Ava's Man "a big book, at once tough and sentimental," while The New York Times said, "It is hard to think of a writer who reminds us more forcefully and wonderfully of what people and families are all about."

Bragg acknowledges that his language is stolen -- plucked from the mouths of the family members he has interviewed, filling notebooks and jotting stories on whatever was at hand -- the back of airplane tickets, for example. The biggest challenge, he would later say, was finding an order in the mess of folksy storytelling. "Talking to my people is like herding cats," he told The Kansas City Star in 2002. "You can't rely on them to walk down the road and not run into the bushes."

And, then, there would be the recollection that would come along just a little too late.

"The most agonizing thing was to finish the manuscript, know that I had pleased [the family], then have one of them say, ‘Oh, yeah, hon, I just thought of something else' -- and it would be the best story you ever heard," he told the Star.

Good To Know

Bragg brought his mother, Margaret, to New York for the Pulitzer Prize ceremony. She had never been to the city, never been on an airplane, never ridden on an escalator, and hadn't bought a dress for herself in 18 years.

In an interview with Writer, Bragg describes life as a newspaper correspondent: "If I travel for the paper, that means I fly to a city I've probably never been to, get off a plane, rent a car, drive out in bumper-to-bumper traffic heading for a little town that nobody knows the name of and can't give me directions to, and it's not on the map. When I get there, I try to get information in 15 minutes for a story I have to write in 45."

He wrote Ava's Man because his fans wanted to know more about his mother's childhood.

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    1. Hometown:
      New Orleans, Louisiana
    1. Date of Birth:
      July 26, 1959
    2. Place of Birth:
      Possum Trot, Alabama
    1. Education:
      Attended Jacksonville State University for six months in 1970; attended Harvard University, 1992-1993

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