Overview

This collection presents, for the first time, a much-needed synthesis of the major research themes and findings that characterize the Woodland Period in the southeastern United States.

The Woodland Period (ca. 1200 B.C. to A.D. 1000) has been the subject of a great deal of archaeological research over the past 25 years. Researchers have learned that in this approximately 2000-year era the peoples of the Southeast experienced increasing ...

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The Woodland Southeast

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Overview

This collection presents, for the first time, a much-needed synthesis of the major research themes and findings that characterize the Woodland Period in the southeastern United States.

The Woodland Period (ca. 1200 B.C. to A.D. 1000) has been the subject of a great deal of archaeological research over the past 25 years. Researchers have learned that in this approximately 2000-year era the peoples of the Southeast experienced increasing sedentism, population growth, and organizational complexity. At the beginning of the period, people are assumed to have been living in small groups, loosely bound by collective burial rituals. But by the first millennium A.D., some parts of the region had densely packed civic ceremonial centers ruled by hereditary elites. Maize was now the primary food crop. Perhaps most importantly, the ancient animal-focused and hunting-based religion and cosmology were being replaced by solar and warfare iconography, consistent with societies dependent on agriculture, and whose elites were increasingly in competition with one another. This volume synthesizes the research on what happened during this era and how these changes came about while analyzing the period's archaeological record.

In gathering the latest research available on the Woodland Period, the editors have included contributions from the full range of specialists working in the field, highlighted major themes, and directed readers to the proper primary sources. Of interest to archaeologists and anthropologists, both professional and amateur, this will be a valuable reference work essential to understanding the Woodland Period in the Southeast.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"1000 B.C.-A.D. 1000, the proverbial vacuum that Native and Southeastern archaeologists abhor? Well, no more! This volume provides wide ranging, up-to-date, and authoritative coverage of an important period in southeastern prehistory that, until now, has not received the emphasis it deserves."
—James Stoltman, University of Wisconsin

"This volume takes a big step in putting into print the latest and best research on the archaeology of the Woodland period in the Southeast. . . . There is something in this edited volume for anyone interested in the lives and times of native peoples during a critical period in the prehistory of the southeastern United States."
Southeastern Archaeology

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780817313173
  • Publisher: University of Alabama Press
  • Publication date: 9/15/2009
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 696
  • File size: 7 MB

Meet the Author

David G. Anderson is an archaeologist with the National Park Service's Southeast Archeological Center in Tallahassee, Florida, and coeditor of The Paleoindian and Early Archaic Southeast. Robert C. Mainfort Jr. is an archaeologist with the Arkansas Archeological Survey in Fayetteville.

 

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Table of Contents

Figures
Tables
Preface
1 An Introduction to Woodland Archaeology in the Southeast 1
2 Woodland Period Archaeology of the Central Mississippi Valley 20
3 Plum Bayou Culture of the Arkansas - White River Basin 44
4 Woodland Period Archaeology of the Lower Mississippi Valley 66
5 Fourche Maline: A Woodland Period Culture of the Trans-Mississippi South 91
6 The Woodland Period in the Northern Ozarks of Missouri 113
7 Woodland Period Archaeology in the American Bottom 134
8 Deconstructing the Woodland Sequence from the Heartland: A Review of Recent Research Directions in the Upper Ohio Valley 162
9 Woodland Cultures of the Elk and Duck River Valleys, Tennessee: Continuity and Change 185
10 Woodland Period Settlement Patterning in the Northern Gulf Coastal Plain of Alabama, Mississippi, and Tennessee 204
11 Woodland Cultural and Chronological Trends on the Southern Gulf Coastal Plain: Recent Research in the Pine Hills of Southeastern Mississippi 228
12 The Woodland Period in the Appalachian Summit of Western North Carolina and the Ridge and Valley Province of Eastern Tennessee 249
13 The Woodland in the Middle Atlantic: Ranking and Dynamic Political Stability 270
14 A Woodland Period Prehistory of Coastal North Carolina 292
15 Aspects of Deptford and Swift Creek of the South Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plains 318
16 Weeden Island Cultures 352
17 The Woodland Archaeology of South Florida 373
18 Woodland Ceramic Beginnings 398
19 Culture-Historical Units and the Woodland Southeast: A Case Study from Southeastern Missouri 421
20 Shellfish Use during the Woodland Period in the Middle South 444
21 Woodland Faunal Exploitation in the Midsouth 461
22 The Development and Dispersal of Agricultural Systems in the Woodland Period Southeast 483
23 Woodland Cave Archaeology in Eastern North America 502
24 Domesticating Self and Society in the Woodland Southeast 525
25 Epilogue: Future Directions for Woodland Archaeology in the Southeast 540
References Cited 543
Contributors 664
Index 668
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