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Word 2013 eLearning Kit For Dummies
     

Word 2013 eLearning Kit For Dummies

by Lois Lowe
 

A step-by-step learning package to get you up and running with Word 2013!

If you're eager to get started using the new Microsoft Word 2013, this self-paced eLearning Kit is an ideal starting point! Featuring a full-color printed book and an online interactive eLearning course, this multimedia kit takes you through the basics of the Word interface and

Overview

A step-by-step learning package to get you up and running with Word 2013!

If you're eager to get started using the new Microsoft Word 2013, this self-paced eLearning Kit is an ideal starting point! Featuring a full-color printed book and an online interactive eLearning course, this multimedia kit takes you through the basics of the Word interface and explains how to navigate it, how to get comfortable with the terminology, and how to use its many features. Follow the material sequentially or jump in and out as you wish - it's set up so you can learn at your own pace. Throughout, you will benefit from illustrations, animations, voiceover explanations, and the option of closed captioning if you find you learn better when you can read the instructions.

  • Helps self-motivated learners master Word 2013, the most popular word processing application
  • Teaches you how to create and format a Word document, while guiding you through the entire process so that you get a solid understanding of the importance and potential of every step
  • Includes an easy-to-follow, full-color book and an online interactive Dummies eLearning Course that corresponds with the book available via access code
  • Allows you to follow material sequentially or choose separate sections at your own time and pace

Packed with screenshots, examples, pictures, and step-by-step instructions, Word 2013 eLearning Kit For Dummies helps you get the most of what Word 2013 has to offer!

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781118491263
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
04/28/2014
Pages:
352
Sales rank:
1,316,160
Product dimensions:
7.30(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.90(d)

Related Subjects

Read an Excerpt

Word 2013 eLearning Kit For Dummies


By Lois Lowe

John Wiley & Sons

Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-118-49126-3


CHAPTER 1

Getting to Know Word 2013


[check] Moving around in a document enables you to view different parts of the document that may not be onscreen at the moment. You can use scroll bars, arrow keys, and keyboard shortcuts in any combination.

[check] Changing the onscreen view helps you focus on the important parts of the document for the task you want to perform. Each application has its own unique set of views, as well as a Zoom control.

[check] Saving and opening documents lets you store your work for later use and then recall it to the screen when you're ready to continue. The Save As and Open dialog boxes share a common look and feel in all applications.


1. How do you start Word?

Open to page 9

2. How can you find out what a certain button on the Ribbon is for?

Buttons take a bow on page 12

3. What is Backstage view?

Peek through the curtain to page 18

4. After you save a file, how can you reopen the Save As dialog box so you can save it with a different name?

Boxes bounce back on page 25

5. How can you quickly reopen a recently opened document?

Race over to page 34

6. Is the document area that's visible onscreen where your typing appears?

Make an appearance on page 37

7. How do you change the magnification of text onscreen?

Zoom over to page 43


Microsoft Word is a word-processing application that can help you create many kinds of written documents, including reports, letters, newsletters, and labels. Word excels at any kind of text-based task.

Word is part of the Microsoft Office suite. A suite is a group of applications that are designed to work together and to have similar user interfaces that cut down on the learning curve for each one.


TIP

The time you spend now learning the Word interface will benefit you later if you decide to tackle any of the other Office applications.


Starting Word

The most straightforward way to start Word is to select it from the Windows 8 Start screen (or Windows 7 Start menu). You can browse through the list of programs, or you can start typing the application's name and then click its name when it appears.

Depending on how your PC is set up, you may also have a shortcut to Word on your desktop and/or on the taskbar.


TIP

You can double-click a data file that's associated with Word, but this method works only after you've created or saved a Word document on your computer.

When you're finished with Word, you can click its Close (X) button in its upper-right corner to exit. If you have any unsaved work, you're prompted to save it.


Starting Word in Windows 8

In the following exercise, you practice opening and closing Word. This exercise is for Windows 8 users; if you have Windows 7, use the next exercise instead.

Files needed: None

1. In Windows 8, press the Windows key to display the Start screen.

2. Click Word 2013. (Scroll to the right to locate that tile if needed, as in Figure 1-1.)

The Word application opens.

3. Click the Close (X) button in the upper-right corner of the Word window.

The Word application window closes.

4. Press the Windows key to reopen the Start screen.

5. Type Word.

The Search panel appears, and the Apps list is filtered to show only applications with "Word" in their names. See Figure 1-2.

6. From the list of applications that appears, click Word 2013.

The Word application opens.


Leave Word open for the next exercise.

Figure 1-1 shows the Start screen for Windows 8.1, which allows you to create named groups for the tiles on the Start screen. In Figure 1-1, a group called Microsoft Office 2013 has been created, and shortcuts to each of the Office applications have been placed in that group. Your screen may look somewhat different depending on whether you have Windows 8.0 or Windows 8.1 and what groups have been created.


Starting Word in Windows 7

In the following exercise, you practice opening and closing Word. This exercise is for Windows 7 users; if you have Windows 8, use the preceding exercise instead.

Files needed: None

1. Click the Start button.

The Start menu opens.

2. Click All Programs.

A list of all installed applications appears. Some of the applications are organized into folders.

3. Click the Microsoft Office 2013 folder.

A list of the Microsoft Office 2013 applications appears.

4. Click Word 2013.

The Word application opens.

5. Click the Close (X) button in the upper-right corner of the Word window.

The Word application window closes.

6. Click the Start button.

7. Type Word .

The Start menu is filtered to show applications that contain those letters in their names.

8. From the list of applications that appears, click Word 2013.

The Word application opens.

Leave Word open for the next exercise.


Exploring the Word Interface

The Word 2013 interface consists of a tabbed Ribbon, a File menu, a status bar, window controls, and other common features. In the following sections, you become familiar with these common elements.


Exploring the Ribbon and tabs

All Office 2013 applications have a common system of navigation called the Ribbon, which is a tabbed bar across the top of the application window. Each tab is like a page of buttons. You click different tabs to access different sets of buttons and features.

In the following exercise, you practice using the commands on the Ribbon in Microsoft Word.

Files needed: None

1. If Word isn't already open from the preceding exercise, open it.

2. Press Esc or click Blank document to start a new document.

3. On the Ribbon, click the Insert tab.

Buttons for inserting various types of content appear.


TIP

The buttons are organized into groups; the group names appear at the bottom. For example, the Pages group is the leftmost group.

4. In the Symbols group, hover the mouse pointer over the Equation button.

A ScreenTip appears, telling you the button's name and purpose and showing a keyboard shortcut (Alt+=) that you can optionally use to select that command. See Figure 1-3.

5. Click the Equation button.

A new equation box appears in the document, and the Equation Tools Design tab appears on the Ribbon. See Figure 1-4.

6. Press Delete to remove the equation box.

The Home tab reappears.

7. Click the Insert tab again, and in the Header & Footer group, click the Header button.

A menu opens. See Figure 1-5.

8. Click away from the menu to close it without making a selection.

9. In the Illustrations group, click SmartArt.

The Choose a SmartArt Graphic dialog box opens. See Figure 1-6.

10. Click Cancel to close the dialog box without creating a graphic.

11. Click the Home tab, and in the Font group, click the Bold button.

The Bold attribute is toggled on. See Figure 1-7.

12. Type your first name.

Your first name appears in bold.

13. Click the Bold button again.

The Bold attribute is toggled off.

14. Press the space bar, and then type your last name.

Your last name does not appear in bold.

In the Paragraph group, notice that the Align Left button is selected.

15. Click the Center button in the Paragraph group.

Your name is centered horizontally on the page. See Figure 1-8.


TIP

The paragraph alignment buttons are a set; when you select one, the previously selected button is deselected.

16. Click the Undo button on the Quick Access Toolbar.

See Figure 1-9. The last action is undone, and the paragraph alignment goes back to left alignment.

17. Click the dialog box launcher button (shown in Figure 1-9) in the bottom-right corner of the Paragraph group.

A Paragraph dialog box opens. See Figure 1-10.

18. Click Cancel to close the Paragraph dialog box.

19. If the Word window is maximized, click the Restore button in the upper-right corner so that the window is resizable.

See Figure 1-11.

20. Note the buttons available in the Editing group on the Home tab.

21. Drag the right border of the Word window toward the left, decreasing the size of the Word window until the Editing group collapses into a single large button.

See Figure 1-12.

22. Click the Editing button.

The menu that opens contains the buttons that were previously available from the Editing group. See Figure 1-13.

23. Drag the right border of the Word window toward the right until the Editing group is expanded again. Click the Maximize button (second of the three buttons in the window's upper-right corner) if you want to maximize the window.

Leave Word open for the next exercise.


Understanding the File menu

Clicking the File tab opens the File menu, also known as Backstage view. Backstage view provides access to commands that have to do with the data file you're working with — things like saving, opening, printing, mailing, and checking its properties. To leave Backstage view, click some other tab or press the Esc key.

In the following exercise, you practice using the File menu.

Files needed: None

1. If Word isn't already open from the preceding exercise, open it, and then press Esc to display a new blank document.

2. Click the File tab on the Ribbon.

The File menu opens. Categories of commands are listed at the left.


TIP

The category that appears by default depends on whether any changes have been made to the blank document that opens by default when the application starts.

3. Click Open if that category doesn't already appear by default.

This category provides shortcuts for reopening recently used files. See Figure 1-14.

4. Click the Info category and examine the commands available.

This category provides commands for permissions, sharing, and versions, as well as basic information about the file itself.

5. Click the Manage Versions button.

This button opens a menu of additional commands. See Figure 1-15.

6. Click away from the menu without choosing a command from it.

The menu closes.

7. Click the New category.

Buttons appear for creating a new document based on a variety of templates.

8. Click the Print category.

Buttons appear for printing the active document.

9. Click the Share category.

Buttons appear for saving and distributing the active document in different formats.

10. Click the Export category.

Options appear for getting help with the application.

11. Click Close.

The active document and Backstage view close. If prompted to save your changes, click Don't Save. Word remains open.

12. Close the Word Application by clicking the Close (X) button in the upper-right corner of the window.


Creating Your First Document

When you start Word, a new blank document appears automatically, as you saw in the section "Starting Word." Just press Esc at Word's Start screen to access the new blank document. You can begin creating new content in this document and then save your work when you're finished. Alternatively, you can open an existing document or start a different type of document using one of Word's templates.

After starting a new document, you type or insert content into it. Documents can contain text, graphic objects, or a combination of the two. You can use many types of graphic objects, such as photos, clip art, drawings, diagrams, and charts. You learn about these object types in Chapter 8.


Starting a new blank document

In the following exercise, you start two new Word documents using different methods.

Files needed: None

1. Start Microsoft Word 2013 using any method you like.

The Start screen appears. Icons for various template types appear. See Figure 1-16.

2. Click Blank document.

A blank document appears.

3. Press Ctrl+N to start another new blank document.

You can tell it is a different blank document because the name in the title bar changes.

4. Choose FileClose to close one of the blank documents. Leave the other one open.

Leave Word and the blank document open for the next exercise.


Typing text

You can type any text you like into a Word document, creating various document types from posters to dissertations. Just click in the large blank area in the center of the Word window and begin typing.

In the following exercise, you place text into a Word document.

Files needed: None

1. If Word is not already open from the previous exercise, start Word and press Esc to access the new blank document.

2. Type ACME Engineering, press Enter to start a new paragraph, and then type Making smart engineering decisions since 1962 (see Figure 1-17).

3. Press Enter to move the insertion point to the next line, and then press the up-arrow key once to move the insertion point back into the text you typed.

The insertion point appears at the beginning of the word Making.

4. Press the right-arrow key until the insertion point appears between 6 and 2 (see Figure 1-18), and then press the Backspace key to delete the 6.


REMEMBER

If no text is selected, pressing Backspace removes the character to the left of the insertion point.

5. Type 7 and then press the left-arrow key once.

The insertion point moves to the left of the 7.

6. Press the Delete key to delete the 7.


REMEMBER

If no text is selected, pressing Delete removes the character to the right of the insertion point.

7. Type 6.

The date once again appears as 1962.

Leave the document open for the next exercise.

The preceding steps walk you through the basics of typing text. In Chapter 2, you explore typing and editing text in more detail.


Inserting a picture

One of the most common graphic types is a picture from file (a picture that's saved as a separate file outside of Word). You can get pictures from the Internet, from friends, or from your own scanner or digital camera.

In the following exercise, you place a graphic into a Word document.

Files needed: 01Graphic01.jpg

1. Start with the Word document open from the preceding exercise.


TIP

If you didn't do the preceding exercise, go back and complete it now.

2. Click below the second paragraph to move the insertion point there.

3. Click the Insert tab on the Ribbon and click the Pictures button.

The Insert Picture dialog box opens.

4. Navigate to the folder containing the data files for this chapter and select 01Graphic01.jpg.

See Figure 1-19.

5. Click the Insert button.

The picture is inserted in the document at the insertion point position.


TIP

The picture appears very large — larger than you might want it to be. Chapter 8 covers resizing a picture. In the meantime, you can drag a corner of the picture to resize it.

Leave the document open for the next exercise.


Saving and Opening Documents

Word can create, open, and save documents that contain the text, graphics, and other content you have entered into Word. If you don't save your work, whatever you've entered disappears when you close the application or turn off your computer.

Throughout the rest of this book, many of the exercises begin with an instruction to open a particular data file and end with an instruction to save it; when instructed to do those things, you can refer back to this section for help as needed.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from Word 2013 eLearning Kit For Dummies by Lois Lowe. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Excerpted by permission of John Wiley & Sons.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Meet the Author

Lois Lowe is the author of several books on Microsoft Office, including Microsoft Word 2010 eLearning Kit For Dummies. She is also an online instructor who develops and teaches courses on Microsoft Office applications, computer purchase and upgrade, home office setup and emerging hardware technologies. Her courses have educated over 250,000 students for clients including Hewlett-Packard and Sony.

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