Word As Action: Racine, Rhetoric, and Theatrical Language

Word As Action: Racine, Rhetoric, and Theatrical Language

by Michael Hawcroft
     
 

Hawcroft presents an exploration of the theatrical qualities of the language of France's greatest tragedian, Jean Racine, taking as its analytical tool two neglected parts of rhetoric—inventio and dispositio. Racine's dialogue is exciting, Hawcroft argues, because he makes persuasive interaction of characters a key feature of his dramatic technique. This book

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Overview

Hawcroft presents an exploration of the theatrical qualities of the language of France's greatest tragedian, Jean Racine, taking as its analytical tool two neglected parts of rhetoric—inventio and dispositio. Racine's dialogue is exciting, Hawcroft argues, because he makes persuasive interaction of characters a key feature of his dramatic technique. This book shows how Racine deploys persuasion in well-defined contexts: trials, embassies, and councils; informal oratory as protagonists try to manipulate each other and their confidants in order to make their own views and wishes prevail; self-persuasion in monologues; and narrations, often used by characters with persuasive intent. The book draws illuminating and provocative comparisons with other playwrights and offers a closer and better documented description of the specific nature of Racine's theatrical language than has previously been available in any one study.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780198151852
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Publication date:
06/28/1992
Series:
Oxford Modern Languages and Literature Monographs Series
Pages:
288
Product dimensions:
5.75(w) x 8.75(h) x 0.86(d)
Lexile:
1360L (what's this?)

Table of Contents

Note
Abbreviations
Introduction1
1Verbal Action and Rhetorical Theory12
IAction and Verbal Action12
IISome Affinities between Rhetoric and Drama26
IIIRacine's Rhetoric29
IVRhetorical Theory: Inventio and Dispositio34
2Formal Oratory: Trials, Embassies, and Councils61
IForensic Orators in Les Plaideurs62
IIThree Ambassadors: Mathan, Ephestion, and Oreste74
IIIA Family Embassy: Racine's and Du Ryer's Esther92
IVFamily Oratory in Britannicus and Mithridate102
3Informal Oratory: The Protagonists113
IMasked and Unmasked Orators: Iphigenie and Astrate114
IIInquisitorial Oratory: Anaximenes and Mithridate134
IIIBerenice: Elegy, Verbal Action, and Corneille's Tite et Berenice142
4Informal Oratory: The Confidants160
ICorneille's Sophonisbe: The Dangers Illustrated162
IIRacine's Persuasive Confidants: The Example of Albine167
IIIWhen Confidants Meet their Partners after the Exposition: Andromaque and Phedre174
5Self-Persuasion: Monologues183
ILyricism versus Persuasion: Antigone, Antiochus, and Atalide188
IIDeliberative and Judicial Oratory in Racine's Monologues197
IIIAccompanied Monologues: Phedre, Racine, and Pradon211
6Persuasive Narrations218
IDramatic Narrative: Bajazet219
IIThe Death Recit: Andromaque, Britannicus, and Phedre225
Conclusion243
IArguments243
IIProblems245
IIIRhetoric and Tragedy250
Appendix: Scheme of Inventio and Dispositio254
Bibliography255
Index of Rhetorical Terms269
Index of Racine's Works271
Index of Names273

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