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Word Work: Surviving and Thriving As a Writer
     

Word Work: Surviving and Thriving As a Writer

5.0 4
by Bruce Holland Rogers, Bruce Holland Rogers
 

Combining sympathy with practical advice, this guide enables writers to overcome mental and spiritual battles to get words on a page. Anecdotes from established authors, psychological theory, and hands-on exercises help writers understand and move beyond writer’s block. Topics include preventing procrastination, generating inspiration, staying passionate,

Overview


Combining sympathy with practical advice, this guide enables writers to overcome mental and spiritual battles to get words on a page. Anecdotes from established authors, psychological theory, and hands-on exercises help writers understand and move beyond writer’s block. Topics include preventing procrastination, generating inspiration, staying passionate, targeting long-term happiness, the role of relationships, and dealing with both rejection and success. This sound advice will give any writer, beginner or professional, a road map to greater productivity, confidence, and satisfaction.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“These brilliant essays illuminate the art of writing in a way that I have never seen before. I recommend Word Work to every writer and to everyone who hopes to be a writer.”  —Damon Knight, author, Creating Short Fiction

Library Journal
Here is another manual for writers by a fiction instructor and published author who has given serious thought to the vocation. Written mostly in the first person, the text offers anecdotal advice and practical suggestions addressing the "affective" needs of writers. Rogers provides insights into that monster called "writer's block" and the guilt associated with procrastination and shows how such traditional enemies of the writer can be allies. In personal chapters on invention, inspiration, and the place and circumstances of his work, Rogers explores his relationship with his own writing. The chapters on the hazards and benefits of writing workshops as well as those on the value of writing "buddies" are particularly insightful. Readers looking for guidance on bettering their craft or on the practicalities of publishing and marketing their work may be disappointed. Those who appreciate the honest reflections of a practicing and thoughtful writer will value the opportunity to listen in. Herbert E. Shapiro, SUNY Empire State Coll., Rochester Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781931229173
Publisher:
Invisible Cities Press Llc
Publication date:
05/28/2002
Edition description:
1ST
Pages:
272
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.80(d)

Meet the Author


Bruce Holland Rogers is the author of Wind Over Heaven, Flaming Arrows, and Bedtime Stories to Darken Your Dreams. His awards include a Pushcart Prize, a Bram Stoker Award, and two Nebula Awards. He lives in Eugene, Oregon.

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Word Work: Surviving and Thriving As a Writer 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
PriscillaLong More than 1 year ago
Insightful and comforting. Rogers writes from deep and long experience and the fact that he reveals his own writer's conundrums and how he's gotten through them makes this a valuable aid. 
Guest More than 1 year ago
About this book, Damon Knight said, ¿These brilliant essays illuminate the art of writing in a way I have never seen before.¿ That is exactly what Bruce Holland Rogers has accomplished, and Mr. Knight is right. Many writing books give the reader specific technical instruction followed by batches of writing exercises. Not so with this one. Although Rogers shares ideas for getting around writing problems (procrastination, networking, writer's block, taking rejections, etc.), he concentrates on the entire world of being a writer. He shares what he knows in essay format in such a way that any reflective, working writer can benefit. I was especially taken by the chapter, "Death and the Day Job," in which Rogers discusses the real reasons we should think about and focus upon our writing and why we do it. This is a book for thinkers, doers, achievers, and all those who want to work toward accomplishments in any realm of writing. It reads like a wise, but humble, mentor is sharing the information, and the entire book is peppered with humor and information about other writers and their processes. I give this book high marks and recommend it to all thoughtful and reflective writers who are working at a career in writing. ~Lori L. Lake, Midwest Book Review
Guest More than 1 year ago
Every writer, young or old should have a copy of this book. The words of this book are intriguing and inspirational. Before I read Word Work, I would get discouraged when didn¿t write. Like the author I would put writing off to do other things and this book has helped me focus on fighting that problem. Mr. Holland Rogers throws various true-life situations on the table that every writer encounters. That¿s what makes this book about becoming a writer the best choice. I highly recommend this book to any aspiring writer.
Guest More than 1 year ago
In his book, 'Word Work: Surviving and Thriving as a Writer,' Bruce Holland Rogers penetrates deeply into topics at the core of the writing process and what it means to be a writer: procrastination, ADD and manic depression, writing workshops, fear of death, handling rejection and success, and balancing relationships with loved ones.

The result is a book that is unique among all other writing books because it encourages you, the writer, to examine many of your pre-conceived notions about your own writing or the writing process in general. You'll begin asking yourself questions like, 'Why do I write?' 'How is my opinion of my writing affecting my growth?' 'What relationships are important to me as a writer?' Throughout the text, Rogers does a great job of balancing the spiritual aspects of these inquiries with the writer's need for pragmatic solutions.

'Word Work' also explores some of the more basic aspects of the writing life including where and how to work, methods for jump-starting a project, and ways to get away from it all when you need a break. As a dedicated writer and teacher of college writing who has read dozens of books on the subject, I heartily recommend this book to both professionals and budding amateurs who want to grow--not only as writers, but also as human beings.