WordPress 24-Hour Trainer

Overview

The easy, self-paced guide to the powerful WordPressplatform

WordPress 24-Hour Trainer, 3rd Edition provides acomprehensive, unique book-and-video package that focuses on thepractical, everyday tasks you will face when creating andmaintaining WordPress websites. This easy-to-use, friendly guidewill show you how to create and edit pages, integrate your sitewith social media, keep your site secure, make content more searchengine friendly to help ...

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Overview

The easy, self-paced guide to the powerful WordPressplatform

WordPress 24-Hour Trainer, 3rd Edition provides acomprehensive, unique book-and-video package that focuses on thepractical, everyday tasks you will face when creating andmaintaining WordPress websites. This easy-to-use, friendly guidewill show you how to create and edit pages, integrate your sitewith social media, keep your site secure, make content more searchengine friendly to help drive website traffic, troubleshoot themost common WordPress issues, and much more.

This updated edition of WordPress 24-Hour Trainer covers thelatest features of WordPress 4.0 and 4.1 in an easy-to-useformat:

  • Fully-illustrated guides to key tasks you'll need to performwith WordPress.
  • At the end of each lesson a list of related plugins you caninstall to make WordPress an even more powerful tool.
  • Step-by-step guides at the end of lessons to help you practicewhat you just learned.
  • Videos that show you first hand some of the concepts in eachlesson.

WordPress 24-Hour Trainer, 3rd Edition is yourperfect real-world guide to fully leveraging this powerfulplatform.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781118066904
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 8/16/2011
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 408
  • Sales rank: 617,884
  • Product dimensions: 9.20 (w) x 7.40 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

George Plumley is a freelance web developer and designer who has specialized in helping small business clients build and update their websites for more than 20 years, the last seven of which have focused exclusively on WordPress. He has trained hundreds of clients and students, and regularly provides workshops and seminars on using and customizing WordPress.

Wrox guides are crafted to make learning programming languages and technologies easier than you think. Written by programmers for programmers, they provide a structured, tutorial format that guides you through all the techniques involved.

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Read an Excerpt

WordPress 24-Hour Trainer


By George Plumley

John Wiley & Sons

Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd
All right reserved.

ISBN: 978-1-1180-6690-4


Chapter One

Thinking Like WordPress

WordPress provides you with the tools to organize your website content, but those tools function in specific ways, just as one type of word processing software has its specific buttons for creating, say, lists. But there's a difference between knowing which button to press to create a list and thinking about ways you can use lists in your documents. That's what this lesson is about: learning to think like WordPress so that you can organize your content in an efficient and flexible manner right from the start, and be able to use it in new and useful ways later.

DYNAMIC VS. STATIC WEBSITES

When you open a website in your browser, you see a single page filled with text and media (graphics, photos, video, and so on), as a page in a magazine or newspaper is a single entity made up of text and images. But what you see in a browser window is created from a series of instructions: the HTML code. So ultimately, the HTML is the single entity behind what you see onscreen: the equivalent of the printed page.

However, there's an important difference between an HTML page and a printed page. The HTML that's fed to your browser may be a single entity when it arrives at the browser, but it may or may not be a single entity sitting on the server waiting for browsers to retrieve it, like a magazine on a newsstand waiting to be purchased. The HTML may be made up of chunks of code that get assembled into a whole in that split second when the browser pulls it off the shelf.

That's the difference between dynamic and static web pages. Static pages are complete sets of HTML waiting to be retrieved, whereas dynamic pages are chunks of HTML that are assembled at the moment of retrieval into a single entity that's displayed in your browser (some systems store the most recent static version of a dynamically created page to keep the server from being overworked, but ultimately, the browser pages were created dynamically).

What I want you to take away from this lesson in particular, but the book in general, is to reject static thinking in favor of dynamic. You might have a vision right now for the content of a particular page on your website, but if you learn to view the content in chunks, there may be ways to use part of that content on another page as well. Dynamic thinking means you want to keep that chunk of content separate and reusable, not welded to the other content.

CONTENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

Creating HTML pages dynamically is one half of what a content management system (CMS) does: it takes chunks of code (your content) and pieces them together into a single HTML page. The other function of a CMS is to provide an easy way for you, the user, to manage all those chunks of content.

Managing content does not just mean allowing you to enter text or upload images; it also means making it easy for you to determine the relationships between chunks of content. Selecting a category for the article you're working on, for example, tells the CMS to assemble that chunk in a particular way when someone on the Internet requests a page on your website.

Everybody understands the role of a CMS when it comes to managing content: it saves having to know HTML coding. But why not just have the CMS manage the content of individual HTML pages? All this assembling business seems like a lot of extra work. If you had a five-page website that never changed, that might be true. But suppose, even on a five-page website, that you decided you didn't like the top section or header that appears on all the pages of your site. Although a CMS for static pages would make it easy to change, you'd still need to change the graphics on all five pages separately, because they're all individual, physical pieces of coding. Now imagine that task on a site with 500 pages or 5,000! Even with search-and-replace capabilities, you would need to upload all 5,000 pages back onto the server to replace the old version, then do it all again for the next change. Ouch!

By separating the content of individual HTML pages into chunks, a CMS offers tremendous flexibility. Say you wanted 3,000 of your pages to have a different kind of header than the other 2,000. Easy, with a CMS! What if your business partner decides that your line of 500 different wuzzbuzzes should be categorized under buzz instead of wuzz? Easy, with a CMS!

We're always being told to embrace change, and one of the advantages of a website over print is that it allows you to change things as much as you want, as often as you want. The advantage of using a CMS instead of manually creating static or dynamic web pages is that the managing of change is much easier and more flexible, which is exactly what WordPress does.

WordPress as a CMS

In the first edition of this book, I explained that, although WordPress was developed as blogging software, it could be manipulated to be used as a CMS for any type of site. With the latest versions of WordPress, it has become a full-fledged CMS. But the question still remains: why use WordPress for your website? Lots of other content management systems are out there—good ones—that are also open source. I think the answer is twofold:

* The simplicity and flexibility of WordPress's design make it easy to learn, easy to expand, and easy to customize.

* The WordPress community is so large and so vibrant that you have excellent support, and will have for years to come.

The fact is, every CMS requires creative thinking, sometimes add-on software, and sometimes customization of the coding, because every site owner will have specific needs. No one CMS can fulfill everyone's requirements right out of the box.

All websites have a lot of common elements that may have different names and different functions, but from the standpoint of HTML coding, they operate in basically the same way. For instance, I need a page full of testimonials whereas you need a page of all your current specials. If a testimonial and a special are the chunks of content, all we need the CMS to do is assemble our chunks into whole pages. Your header and footer may be very different in look and content from mine, but we both need a header and a footer. A good CMS couldn't care less which is which—it just assembles and manages, easily and efficiently. As WordPress does.

HOW WORDPRESS ASSEMBLES PAGES

Three basic structures in WordPress interact to create HTML pages: the core, the theme, and the database (where content is stored). The core is the set of files that you download from WordPress.org and that perform the tasks of storing, retrieving, and assembling content. The database is where the content is stored and the theme is made up of template files that provide instructions to the core about what to retrieve and how to assemble it, as I've tried to illustrate in Figure 1-1.

Why Separate Is Good

You saw earlier why it's important that a CMS keep form (design and structure) and content (text and media files) separate, and now you're seeing the particular power of the way WordPress achieves this. Remember that earlier example of wanting 3,000 pages to have one header and 2,000 pages a different header? Depending on exactly how WordPress generates those pages, you might have to add only one template file to your theme to accomplish the change.

If you want to see a dramatic example of how the separation of form and content works on the Web, visit a site called CSS Zen Garden (www.csszengarden.com). You can instantly switch between dozens of incredibly different looks, all presenting exactly the same content.

But separating form and content isn't the only useful kind of separation that WordPress employs. It also separates the form from the core—the set of files that do the actual assembling and managing. That core is completely separate from the theme and the content, which is a good thing from a number of standpoints, the most important of which is the ability to easily update the core.

Software of any kind is constantly being given new features, strengthened for security, made more efficient, and so on. If you had to completely redo your theme every time the core needed an update, it would be very inefficient, just as having to redo your website content because of a new structure or look would be inefficient. As I said earlier, WordPress at its heart is a set of three separate structures—the core, the theme, and the content (in a database)—each of which can be tweaked, updated, or completely replaced, all independently.

There's a fourth separate structure to WordPress that is entirely optional: plugins. These are bits of extra code that you literally plug into the WordPress system and they provide additional functionality, from letting people rate the content on your site to automatically creating tweets on Twitter.

Sometimes, people ask why they don't just incorporate the plugins into the core, but that would be defeating the whole purpose of this elegant and flexible system. To begin with, plugins are meant to address specific needs. Why clutter the core with features that not everyone uses? Sometimes, a plugin is so useful to everyone that it is eventually incorporated into the core, but most plugins aren't like that. Also, the more complex the core, the better the chance things will break down. Keep the core simple and add on extras as you need them. I have some WordPress sites with only two plugins, and others have dozens.

Another reason for keeping extra features as plugins is that there can be many variations of a plugin, each one serving the needs of a group of users. A good example would be plugins for photos—some are very simple, some are very complex, some work better than others. Having a choice of those plugins, rather than being stuck with only one, is another important advantage.

HOW WORDPRESS MANAGES CONTENT

Very easily, thank you. Like any CMS, WordPress stores the chunks of content it uses to assemble HTML pages in a database. Getting that content into the database, letting you edit that content, and then storing instructions about how that content relates to other content is really what managing the content means. All databases work pretty much the same way, and though part of WordPress's simplicity and flexibility stems from the way its creators built the database and the files to run it, what ultimately matters to users is the interface that's used to do the managing. It's this administrative interface (a sample screen is shown in Figure 1-2) that my clients and hundreds of thousands of users around the world find so easy to use—for them, it is WordPress.

Every CMS has its particular way of dealing with content and though WordPress is extremely easy to use, you still need to understand how it refers to content and the methods it uses to organize content. Take posts, for example. In the world of blogging, people refer to the act of creating a new blog entry as posting. So it's not surprising that the primary kind of content chunk in WordPress is called a post, but that doesn't mean we have to use WordPress posts exclusively for a blog. A post is just a block of text and some instructions stored in a database. They could just as well have called them chunks. We don't want to get tied to how we use posts simply because they were originally intended for and named after an element within blogs.

WordPress has another type of content chunk called a page, but not the HTML pages you see in your browser. Like posts, WordPress pages are essentially blocks of text and accompanying instructions stored in a database. They're different from posts, though, in several ways. For a start, you can put only one WordPress page at a time into the final assembled HTML page. On the other hand, you can have dozens or even hundreds of posts displayed on a single assembled HTML page.

Suppose you set up WordPress so that each press release for your company is entered as an individual post. Then, you tell WordPress to show the five most recent press release posts. Whenever you add a new press release, it goes to the top of the list. On the other hand, the content describing your company's mission statement doesn't change that often—it's static in comparison to press releases—so you set up a WordPress page for that content. That's how you'll hear people describe the difference between posts and pages: one is for dynamic content and the other is for static content. The main thing is not to confuse a WordPress page with the final HTML page that gets generated and viewed by the public. WordPress pages and posts are both chunks of content that just get utilized in different ways.

There's another important difference between posts and pages: posts can be categorized whereas pages cannot. Pages can be a sub-page of another page, but it's a very limited relationship. There's a lot you can do with categories, as you will see later, but I'll mention one here: a post can be placed in multiple categories at the same time. That has enormous consequences for how you use posts. It makes it very simple for the content of a post to appear in several or even dozens of places on a website.

(Continues...)



Excerpted from WordPress 24-Hour Trainer by George Plumley Copyright © 2011 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Excerpted by permission of John Wiley & Sons. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Table of Contents

INTRODUCTION xxvii

SECTION I: BEFORE YOU START

LESSON 1: THINKING LIKE WORDPRESS 3

Static Versus Dynamic Web Pages 3

Content Management Systems 5

LESSON 2: PLANNING YOUR SITE FOR WORDPRESS 11

Mapping Out Your Site Content 11

Special Site Functionality 16

How You Want the Site to Look 18

Try It 20

SECTION II: FIRING UP WORDPRESS

LESSON 3: INSTALLING WORDPRESS 23

Hosting WordPress 23

Manually Installing WordPress 25

Auto-Installing WordPress 27

When the Installation Is Finished 28

Try It 29

LESSON 4: ADMIN AREA OVERVIEW 31

Logging In 31

Navigating the Admin Area 32

The Dashboard 36

Customizing Admin Screens 36

Getting Comfortable 39

Try It 41

LESSON 5: BASIC ADMIN SETTINGS 43

The Settings Menu 43

Profile Settings 49

Try It 53

LESSON 6: ADDING A NEW POST: AN OVERVIEW 57

Navigating to Add a New Post 57

Adding a New Post 59

Try It 66

LESSON 7: WORKING WITH TEXT IN THE CONTENT EDITOR 69

Anatomy of the Content Editor 69

Working with the Content Editor 73

Try It 88

LESSON 8: BASIC POST SCREEN FUNCTIONS 89

Publish 89

Try It 102

LESSON 9: ADVANCED POST FUNCTIONS 103

Revisions 103

Excerpt 104

Custom Fields 107

Discussion 108

Comments 109

Slug 109

Author 109

Try It 110

LESSON 10: ADDING A NEW PAGE 113

Pages Versus Posts 113

Adding a Page 113

Page Attributes 115

Order 117

Try It 118

LESSON 11: THE BASICS OF ADDING MEDIA FILES 121

Uploading and Inserting an Image into a Post 121

Uploading an Image to the Media Library 125

Problems Uploading Media Files 128

Try It 131

LESSON 12: THE MEDIA UPLOADER WINDOW 133

Insert Media 135

Create Gallery 142

Set Featured Image 143

Insert from URL 144

Try It 146

LESSON 13: WORKING WITH IMAGES IN THE CONTENT EDITOR 149

The Image Details Window 149

Moving Images 153

Resizing Images 154

Design Considerations for Image Placement 157

Try It 159

LESSON 14: USING THE WORDPRESS IMAGE EDITOR 161

The Image Editor Functions 163

Cropping an Image 164

Scaling an Image 166

Controlling WordPress Image Dimensions 167

Flipping an Image 168

Try It 169

LESSON 15: WORKING WITH WORDPRESS IMAGE GALLERIES 171

Creating an Image Gallery in a Post 171

More Gallery Options 177

Try It 180

LESSON 16: ADDING VIDEO AND AUDIO 183

Video 183

Audio 189

Try It 191

LESSON 17: ADDING DOCUMENTS 193

Uploading and Inserting a Document 193

Document File Types 196

Updating a Document 196

Try It 198

LESSON 18: MANAGING POSTS AND PAGES 201

Finding Posts and Pages 201

Using Quick Edit 204

Using Bulk Actions 206

Importing Content from Another Site 208

Admin Settings Affecting Posts and Pages 210

Try It 213

LESSON 19: MANAGING MEDIA FILES 215

The Two Faces of the Media Library 215

Filtering and Searching the Media Library 219

Editing and Deleting Media Files 220

Admin Settings for Media 221

Try It 223

LESSON 20: MANAGING POST CATEGORIES AND TAGS 225

Managing Categories 225

Managing Tags 229

Converting Categories and Tags 230

Try It 232

LESSON 21: MANAGING WIDGETS AND MENUS 235

Widgets and Widget Areas 235

The WordPress Menu System 239

Try It 247

LESSON 22: CONNECTING TO SOCIAL MEDIA 251

Helping Visitors Follow You 251

Letting Visitors Share Your Content 253

Posting Directly to Social Media 255

Displaying Social Media Activity 256

Try It 259

LESSON 23: MANAGING COMMENTS 261

Allow Comments? 261

Admin Settings for Commenting 261

Knowing You Have Comments 263

Approving, Editing, or Deleting Comments 265

Dealing with Spam Comments 267

Farming Out Comments 268

Try It 269

LESSON 24: BRINGING IN CONTENT FROM OTHER SITES 271

Adding Content from Third-Party Sites 272

RSS Feeds 273

Try It 277

LESSON 25: CONNECTING BY E-MAIL 279

Contacting You by E-mail 279

Collecting Visitor E-mails 282

E-mailing Site Updates 284

Try It 287

LESSON 26: MANAGING MULTIPLE SITE USERS 289

User Roles and Their Capabilities 289

Adding a User 291

Changing a User’s Abilities 293

Users and Security 293

Try It 295

SECTION VII: CHOOSING AND CUSTOMIZING THEMES

LESSON 27: OVERVIEW OF WORDPRESS THEMES 299

What Is a WordPress Theme? 299

Choosing a WordPress Theme 301

Changing Themes 305

Try It 307

LESSON 28: THEME INSTALLATION AND BASIC CUSTOMIZATION 309

Installing and Activating a Theme 309

Built-in WordPress Design Functions 314

Theme Options 321

Try It 322

LESSON 29: ADVANCED DESIGN CUSTOMIZATION 323

Using Custom CSS 323

Using a Child Theme 325

More Ways to Customize 328

Try It 330

SECTION VIII: BECOMING SEARCH ENGINE FRIENDLY

LESSON 30: OPTIMIZING YOUR CONTENT 333

Writing Search-Friendly Titles 333

Writing Search-Friendly Content 336

Creating Search-Friendly Links 337

Making Images Search-Friendly 338

Try It 339

LESSON 31: OPTIMIZING BEHIND THE SCENES 341

Optimizing Admin Settings 341

Meta Tags 345

Plugins for SEO 346

Monitoring Site Statistics 348

Try It 350

SECTION IX: MAINTENANCE AND SECURITY

LESSON 32: KEEPING UP TO DATE 353

Updating WordPress 353

Updating Plugins 356

Updating Themes 357

Try It 360

LESSON 33: KEEPING BACKUPS 361

The Elements of Backing Up 361

Try It 366

LESSON 34: KEEPING YOUR SITE SECURE 367

Six Steps to Greater WordPress Security 367

Dealing with Sensitive Data 371

Secure Hosting 372

Try It 375

LESSON 35: INSTALLING AND ACTIVATING PLUGINS 379

What Is a Plugin? 379

Try It 384

LESSON 36: MORE PLUGIN SUGGESTIONS 387

Plugin Categories 387

JetPack 395

Plugins for Other Plugins and Themes 396

Try It 396

SECTION XI: REFERENCES

APPENDIX: TROUBLESHOOTING WORDPRESS 399

Site Visible but with an Error Message 399

Error Establishing a Database Connection 400

The White Screen of Death 400

Page Cannot Display 401

You Cannot Recover Your Password 401

Finding Help Online 401

GLOSSARY 405

INDEX 411

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