Worklife Balance: The Agency and Capabilities Gap

Overview

Across welfare societies we have seen the emergence of policies and norms for worklife balance alongside rising expectations among working parents to be able to participate in employment and caregiving, and to have more time for family life and leisure. Yet despite this value placed upon work-life balance, working parents face increasing work demands, as well as rising numbers of insecure and precarious jobs, both of which produce a deepening sense of economic uncertainty in everyday life, which has been ...

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Overview

Across welfare societies we have seen the emergence of policies and norms for worklife balance alongside rising expectations among working parents to be able to participate in employment and caregiving, and to have more time for family life and leisure. Yet despite this value placed upon work-life balance, working parents face increasing work demands, as well as rising numbers of insecure and precarious jobs, both of which produce a deepening sense of economic uncertainty in everyday life, which has been intensified in the current period of financial crises. The agency and capabilities gap addresses these tensions in work-life balance within families, workplace organizations, and policy frameworks. Inspired by Amartya Sen's capabilities approach, this volume considers not just what individuals do, but also their scope of alternatives to make other choices. It includes rich contextualized studies across Western and Eastern European countries and Japan, with a focus on gendered agency inequalities for worklife balance.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780199681136
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • Publication date: 12/24/2013
  • Pages: 320
  • Product dimensions: 6.40 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Barbara Hobson, Professor of Sociology, Stockholm University

Barbara Hobson holds a professor's chair in Sociology, with a specialization in comparative gender studies at Stockholm University. She has published many books and articles on gender and welfare states concerning themes of gender and citizenship, men and social politics, and social movements and gender diversity in welfare states. Her recent publications have focused on sociological applications of the capabilities approach, including articles on fertility and fathers and work-life balance. She has been Strand Coordinator for the EC FP6 Network of Excellence 'Reconciling Work and Welfare in Europe' (RECWOWE, 2007-11). She is founder and co-editor of the journal Social Politics published by Oxford University Press.

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Table of Contents

1. Introduction: capabilities and agency for worklife balance: a multidimensional framework
Barbara Hobson

Part I. The Individual/Household and the Agency and Capabilities Gap: Policy Frameworks, Norms, and Work Organizational Cultures

2. The agency gap: policies, norms, and working time capabilities across welfare states
Susanne Fahlén

3. A sense of entitlement? Agency and capabilities in Sweden and Hungary
Barbara Hobson, Susanne Fahlén, and Judit Takács

4. Worklife balance in Japan: new policies, old practices
Mieko Takahashi, Saori Kamano, Tomoko Matsuda, Setsuko Onode,
and Kyoko Yoshizumi

5. Agency freedom for worklife balance in Germany and Spain
Sonja Drobnic and Margarita León

Part II: The Firm Level and the Agency and Capabilities Gap: Policies, Managers, and Work Organization

6. Workplace worklife balance support from a capabilities perspective
Laura den Dulk, Sandra Groeneveld, and Bram Peper

7. Working-time capabilities at the workplace: individual adjustment options between full-time and part-time working in European Firms
Colette Fagan and Pierre Walthery

8. Capabilities for worklife balance: managerial attitudes and employee practices in the Dutch, British, and Slovenian banking sector
Bram Peper, Laura den Dulk, Nevenka Cernigoj Sadar, Suzan Lewis,
Janet Smithson, and Anneke van Doorne-Huiskes

9. Capabilities for worklife balance in the context of increasing work intensity and precariousness in the service sector and the IT industry in a transitional economy
Aleksandra Kanjuo Mrcela and Nevenka Cernigoj Sadar

10. Conclusion
Introduction: capabilities and agency for worklife balance: a multidimensional framework, Barbara Hobson
Part I. The Individual/Household and the Agency and Capabilities Gap: Policy Frameworks, Norms, and Work Organizational Cultures
2. The agency gap: policies, norms, and working time capabilities across welfare States, Susanne Fahlen
3. A sense of entitlement? Agency and capabilities in Sweden and Hungary, Barbara Hobson, Susanne Fahlen, and Judit Takacs
4. Worklife balance in Japan: new policies, old practices, Mieko Takahashi, Saori Kamano, Tomoko Matsuda, Setsuko Onode, and Kyoko Yoshizumi
5. Agency freedom for worklife balance in Germany and Spain, Sonja Drobnic and Margarita Leon
Part II: The Firm Level and the Agency and Capabilities Gap: Policies, Managers, and Work Organization
6. Workplace worklife balance support from a capabilities perspective, Laura den Dulk, Sandra Groeneveld and Bram Peper
7. Working time capabilities at the workplace: individual adjustment options between full-time and part-time working in European Firms, Colette Fagan and Pierre Walthery
8. Capabilities for worklife balance: managerial attitudes and employee practices in the Dutch, British, and Slovenian banking sector, Bram Peper, Laura den Dulk, Nevenka Černigoj Sadar, Suzan Lewis, Janet Smithson, and Anneke van Doorne-Huiskes
9. Capabilities for worklife balance in the context of increasing work intensity and precariousness in the service sector and the IT industry in a transitional economy, Aleksandra Kanjuo Mrċela and Nevenka &#268ernigoj Sadar
10. Conclusion, Barbara Hobson

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