Worker's Rights

Overview

The Global Viewpoints series provides students and other readers with the information they need to explore global connections and think critically about the worldwide implications of global issues. Each volume focuses on a controversial topic of worldwide importance and offers a panoramic view of opinions selected from a diverse range of international sources, including journals, magazines, newspapers, nonfiction books, speeches, government documents, organization newsletters, and position papers. Each volume ...

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Overview

The Global Viewpoints series provides students and other readers with the information they need to explore global connections and think critically about the worldwide implications of global issues. Each volume focuses on a controversial topic of worldwide importance and offers a panoramic view of opinions selected from a diverse range of international sources, including journals, magazines, newspapers, nonfiction books, speeches, government documents, organization newsletters, and position papers. Each volume contains an annotated table of contents; a world map, to help readers locate countries or areas covered in the essays; "for further discussion" questions; a worldwide list of organizations to contact; bibliographies of books and periodicals; and a subject index. By illuminating the complexities and interrelations of the global community, this excellent resource helps students and other researchers enhance their global awareness.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780737756692
  • Publisher: Gale Cengage Learning
  • Publication date: 5/11/2012
  • Series: Global Viewpoints Series
  • Pages: 224
  • Age range: 14 - 17 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Table of Contents

Foreword 11

Introduction 14

Chapter 1 Labor Regulations Worldwide

1 In Brazil, Excessive Labor Regulations Harm Employers and Workers Economist 20

Brazil's labor laws are outdated and create unnecessary barriers for both employers and workers.

2 Brazil Needs Stronger Regulation of Domestic Workers Ana Virgínia Moreira Gomes Patrícia Tuma Martins Bertolin 26

Brazil has made advances in protecting the rights of domestic workers, but stronger regulations are still needed.

3 In India, More Flexible Labor Regulations Are Needed to Encourage Growth Sadiq Ahmed Shantayanan Devarajan 38

Labour laws in India are hurting manufacturers and eliminating jobs rather than helping workers.

4 Chile Must Adopt Stronger Workplace Safety Regulations for Mines Daniela Estrada 44

A recent mine accident in Chile has highlighted the need to push forward with new and stricter safety regulations to protect workers.

5 In Greece, Vacation and Retirement Provisions Are Too Generous Spiegel Online 51

German chancellor Angela Merkel argues that Greece's retirement age and pensions are too generous. Germany will only help Greece out of its economic crisis if workers' rights are scaled back.

6 American Vacation Policy Is Not Sufficiently Generous David Moberg 57

In comparison to Europeans, Americans receive far fewer vacation days and sick days annually. The American policy is unfair to workers.

Periodical and Internet Sources Bibliography 64

Chapter 2 Unions and Collective Bargaining

1 China Needs Collective Bargaining to Protect Workers' Rights Han Dongfang 66

China's workers need collective bargaining rights to reduce hours and increase wages.

2 The Erosion of Collective Bargaining Threatens Human Rights in the United Kingdom and the World Keith Ewing 72

In Britain, Europe, and around the world, collective bargaining rights are under assault. This is an attack on basic social justice and is immoral.

3 In the United States, Collective Bargaining Harms Workers and Taxpayers Robert Barro 77

Public employee unions restrict workers' right to work and harm taxpayers. Collective bargaining rights for such unions should be rolled back.

4 South Africa Has Moved Toward Greater Centralization of Trade Unions Johann Maree 83

South Africa has moved toward greater centralization of unions because of greater freedom and because of the relationship between unions and the post-apartheid government.

5 Canada May Move Toward Weakening Trade Unions Tom Sandborn 94

America's anti-union climate has caused anti-union forces in Canada to push for weakening unions, while pro-union forces have rallied to defend them.

6 French Unions Threaten Workers' Weil-Being Spencer Fernando 102

Unions striking in France will hurt the interests of workers and will prevent the French economy from adapting to changing demographics and markets.

7 French Unions Protect Workers from Government Aurelien Mondon 106

Unions striking in France show the fraternity of French workers united against pension reforms imposed on behalf of the wealthy and powerful.

Periodical and Internet Sources Bibliography 111

Chapter 3 Workplace Discrimination

1 Workplace Discrimination Is a Growing Problem in Asia 113

International Labour Organization (ILO)

Workers in Asia continue to face traditional forms of gender and ethnic discrimination. New forms of discrimination are also increasing because of economic change and greater migration of people.

2 Caste Discrimination in South Asian Communities in the United Kingdom Is a Serious Problem Roger Green Stephen Whittle Anti Caste Discrimination Alliance (ACDA) 122

Caste discrimination is a serious problem within the Indian community in the United Kingdom. Britain should do more to regulate against this kind of discrimination.

3 Women in Russia Face Workplace Discrimination Elena Novikova 130

Women in Russia continue to face gender discrimination in the workplace. Laws should be passed to confront this.

4 In Israel, Arabs Face Workplace Discrimination Jonathan Cook 135

Arabs are massively underrepresented in Israeli public sector jobs. This is caused by systematic workplace discrimination against Arabs.

Periodical and Internet Sources Bibliography 140

Chapter 4 Migrant and Slave Labor

1 Migrant Domestic Workers Face Slave Labor Conditions in Saudi Arabia Human Rights Watch 142

Migrant domestic workers in Saudi Arabia are excluded from key legal protections and often face slave labor conditions.

2 Germany Is Cracking Down on Migrant Slave Labor in Chinese Restaurants Andreas Ulrich 156

Chinese cooks in some restaurants in Germany are treated as slave labor. The German government is trying to crack down on those who exploit these laborers.

3 Australian Consumers Should Put Pressure on Slave Labor Employers Kelly Griffin 165

Outworkers who work in their own homes face slavery-like conditions in Australia. Australian consumers should avoid products made by exploited labor.

4 In Britain, Internships Have Features in Common with Slave Labor Tom Rawstorne 171

Many firms in the United Kingdom expect interns to work for free in exchange for experience. This practice is unjust and exploitive.

5 In Japan, Internships Can Be Valuable or Exploitative Terrie Lloyd 182

Japanese internships for foreign workers offered by companies can provide valuable experience. However, a government foreign training program for foreign workers is exploitative and unjust.

6 Child Sex Trafficking in Malaysia Is a Serious Problem ECPAT International 189

Malaysian children are trafficked to foreign countries and forced to work as sex slaves. This inhumane and unjust practice must cease.

7 Sex Workers Face Bias in Migration Policies Susie Bright Laura Agustán 197

Sex trafficking is an imprecise term that does not adequately describe the needs and experiences of migrants. Various organizations should focus on the particular resource needs of migrants rather than on prostitution and victimization.

Periodical and Internet Sources Bibliography 210

For Further Discussion 211

Organizations to Contact 213

Bibliography of Books 218

Index 221

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