Working Days: Short Stories about Teenagers at Work

Overview

"Almost without exception, the pieces are thought-provoking and consciousness-raising, and are certain to ring a bell with teenagers working, unemployed, or planning their careers."—Kirkus Reviews
An ALA Best Book: fifteen short stories about teens in the adult workplace.

Fifteen stories relate the experiences of teenagers working for many different reasons in a variety of jobs.

...
See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (12) from $1.99   
  • New (3) from $10.07   
  • Used (9) from $1.99   
Note: Visit our Teens Store.
Sending request ...

Overview

"Almost without exception, the pieces are thought-provoking and consciousness-raising, and are certain to ring a bell with teenagers working, unemployed, or planning their careers."—Kirkus Reviews
An ALA Best Book: fifteen short stories about teens in the adult workplace.

Fifteen stories relate the experiences of teenagers working for many different reasons in a variety of jobs.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Reflecting that "a job was the way you really found out about the world," Rob, the narrator of Kim Stafford's "Riding Up to Ruby's" neatly condenses a theme repeated throughout this anthology. Fifteen stories, 12 of them original, by talented YA authors trace young Americans' experiences at the work place to show the intangible rewards of labor. Most of the featured protagonists, as culturally diverse as their creators, gain wisdom from people they meet on the job. Working at a dull job, the heroine of Mazer's "The Pill Factory" learns something about her strengths by watching a co-worker struggle. In Marilyn Sachs's "Lessons," a tutor is deeply touched by the kindness of her student, a grandfatherly Greek pastry chef who possesses the sensitivity her own stepmother lacks. Tenth-grader Shane, the protagonist of Graham Salisbury's "Forty Bucks," finds something remarkable in an elderly Mexican customer who disbands a gang of troublemakers during Shane's shift at a Taco Bell. Readers need not turn to Mazer's rather drawn-out introduction to extract meaning from these poignant selections. The volume's chorus of strong, expressive voices dynamically conveys the joys, traumas and discoveries of impressionable teens taking their first leap toward adulthood. Ages 10-up. (July)
School Library Journal
Gr 8 UpThese 15 short stories feature teens making their way in the adult world of work. There are no idealized settings here; the young people toil in dirty factories, sleazy motels, and on farms that employ illegal immigrants. The characters do not find these rough conditions jarring since they have not had privileged childhoods. Yet as they view the older, wilted, and disillusioned folks around them, they are determined to triumph and to make a difference in the world. Though the collection reflects a nice diversity of cultures and has a laudable theme, the stories are uneven in quality. Some are sophisticated and have the tone of adult reminiscences. Some selections stand out. In Marilyn Sachs's "Lessons," a lonely young woman tutors an adult Greek immigrant and rebels against her own family's seeming lack of generosity. Anne Mazer's "The Pill Factory" skillfully depicts a teen's persistence in the face of a deadening factory environment. Graham Salisbury's "Forty Bucks" is an interesting vignette about two boys who confront a couple of troublemakers while working the late shift in a Taco Bell in Hawaii. "The Avalon Ballroom" by Ann Hood is a poignant tale of a New York City kid who struggles to get the money to attend Princeton. All but three of the stories are original. "The Baseball Glove" is reprinted from Victor Martnez's Parrot in the Oven (HarperCollins, 1996). Short stories don't tend to circulate highly unless they're on a wildly popular topic or there's a school assignment; as a whole, this collection lacks the kind of pizzazz needed to grab all but the most sophisticated readers.Jacqueline Rose, Lake Oswego Public Library, OR
Kirkus Reviews
The connection between going to work and growing up are explored in this excellent collection from Mazer (Going Where I'm Coming From, 1995, etc.).

Fifteen stories explore what it's like to be young and employed, whether slinging hash in some fast-food joint, salmon-fishing, or picking peppers with a gang of illegal Mexican immigrants. Some stories are humorous, some are serious, but all the protagonists gain insights about themselves and others, or about the human experience, that are worth more than the paychecks. In Roy Hoffman's "Ice Cream Man," Rick's job driving an ice cream truck is enriched by his daily visits with the storytelling Captain; in Mazer's own "The Pill Factory," Meredith is hired to glue labels on jars of vitamins, and discovers through mastering the glue machine how to take control of her own life. Graham Salisbury's "Forty Bucks" is a darkly humorous story of two Hawaiian boys who work the graveyard shift at a Taco Bell, while the protagonist in David Rice's "The Crash Room" works in a hospital emergency room, where he is becoming inured of the endless suffering he encounters. Stories by Marilyn Sachs, Victor Martínez, and Lois Metzger are among those included; almost without exception, the pieces are thought-provoking and consciousness-raising, and are certain to ring a bell with teenagers working, unemployed, or planning their careers.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780892552245
  • Publisher: Persea Books
  • Publication date: 7/28/1997
  • Pages: 207
  • Lexile: 1040L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 5.40 (w) x 8.20 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author

Anne Mazer is the author of several widely acclaimed books, including the novels Moose Street and The Oxboy, and a picture book, The Salamander Room, winner of the Keystone to Reading Book Award and a Reading Rainbow Feature Selection.
Anthologies from edited by Mazer include: America Street, Going Where I'm Coming From, A Walk in My World, and Working Days. Mazur lives in Ithaca, New York.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Introduction
The Daydreamer 3
Ice Cream Man 10
Seashell Motel 24
The Baseball Glove 41
Riding Up to Ruby's 54
Lessons 72
The Pill Factory 83
Forty Bucks 101
The Avalon Ballroom 116
The Crash Room 130
To Walk with Kings 142
Catskill Snows 158
Driver's License 170
Egg Boat 181
Delivery in a Week 190
Biographical Notes on the Authors 203
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)