Working With Chinese Expatriates In Business Negotiations

Working With Chinese Expatriates In Business Negotiations

by Maria Lai-Ling Lam
     
 

This is a study of Chinese expatriates who are working for American clients that seek joint ventures and other business relationships with mainland Chinese business and governmental organizations. The main focus of the study is how these Chinese middlemen and women work to create harmonious business relationships between members of the two very different cultures.

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Overview

This is a study of Chinese expatriates who are working for American clients that seek joint ventures and other business relationships with mainland Chinese business and governmental organizations. The main focus of the study is how these Chinese middlemen and women work to create harmonious business relationships between members of the two very different cultures. The data and the interpretations will be of keen interest to any American business seeking to conduct joint ventures and other forms of commerce in China. The research will also be of interest to any Chinese organization seeking to work more effectively with Americans.

Dr. Lam explains the problems of U.S. and Chinese negotiators—as perceived by Chinese expatriate middlemen—thus bringing a new depth of understanding. The study shows how Chinese expatriates, acting as middlemen, attempt to establish trust and bridge the cultural differences between U.S. and Chinese negotiators in the pre-negotiation stage as preparation for formal negotiations of joint ventures and cooperative projects. Different types of Chinese expatriates are highlighted and this classification illustrates how each type will act in negotiations and what might hinder them from doing what American clients want or need. A representative of each type is described in detail at the end of each chapter. Finally, Dr. Lam provides training strategies to Chinese expatriates and American negotiators.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781567203271
Publisher:
ABC-CLIO, Incorporated
Publication date:
07/30/2000
Pages:
206
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.63(d)
Lexile:
1280L (what's this?)

Meet the Author

MARIA LAI-LING LAM is Assistant Professor of Marketing and International Business at Lingnan University in Hong Kong.

Table of Contents

Prefacexiii
1.Introduction1
Background2
Methodology5
U.S. and Chinese Negotiation Styles6
Looking Ahead: An Overview8
2.General Portraits of Chinese Expatriates9
General Characteristics9
Chineseness (Minzu)9
Chinese Expatriates' Work10
Preparation10
Negotiation11
Post-negotiation12
Concerns During Negotiation12
Summary12
Objectives13
Strategies13
Compensation Strategy and Developing Norms of Reciprocity14
Case Study: Interviewee 4414
The "Little Cheating Strategy"15
The "Little Integrative Strategy"15
Summary15
Major Obstacles15
Problems of American Representatives16
Case Study: Interviewees 32 and 3321
Problems of Chinese Representatives26
Imperfect Translation and Interpretation30
Summary33
Ways of Establishing Relationships Between U.S. and Chinese Representatives34
Relationship Patterns Between the Americans and the Chinese34
Strategies and Tactics in Triangular Relationships34
Resource Dependence36
Expatriates' Advantages over Americans in Developing Trusting Relationships37
Why Interviewees Prefer Developing Relationships with the Chinese Representatives39
Conclusion41
A Rationale for Classifying Interviewees into Five Types43
3.Type I Interviewees47
Characteristics47
Authority and Roles48
Defense of the Chinese Bureaucratic System49
Case Study: Interviewee 4649
Case Study: Interviewee 2350
Case Study: Interviewee 1351
Perceptions of American Representatives' Problems53
Case Study: Interviewee 856
Case Study: Interviewee 457
Summary58
Perceptions of Chinese Representatives' Problems58
Trust-Building and Cross-Cultural Understanding59
A Representative of Type I Interviewees: Miss Chan60
Conclusion68
4.Type II Interviewees70
Characteristics70
Advocacy of Local Chinese Practices73
Perceptions of American Representatives' Problems75
Perceptions of Chinese Representatives' Problems77
Trust-Building and Cross-Cultural Understanding78
A Representative of Type II Interviewees: Miss Lee81
Conclusion93
5.Type III Interviewees94
Characteristics94
Advocacy of U.S. Professional Practices96
Perceptions of American Representatives' Problems100
Perceptions of Chinese Representatives' Problems100
Trust-Building and Cross-Cultural Understanding103
A Representative of Type III Interviewees: Mr. Ho104
Conclusion109
6.Type IV Interviewees111
Characteristics112
Characteristics of Type IV Interviewees112
Inexperienced Type IV Interviewees112
Experienced Type IV Interviewees113
Summary114
Advocacy of American Corporate Practices114
Perceptions of American Representatives' Problems116
Perceptions of Chinese Representatives' Problems117
Case Study: Interviewee 47118
Trust-Building and Cross-Cultural Understanding119
A Representative of Type IV Interviewees: Mr. Wong121
Conclusion129
7.Type V Interviewees131
Characteristics131
Perspectives on Conducting U.S.-China Business134
Perceptions of American Representatives' Problems136
Perceptions of Chinese Representatives' Problems136
Trust-Building and Cross-Cultural Understanding138
Case Study: Interviewee 27138
A Representative of Type V Interviewees: Mr. Cheung140
Conclusion145
8.Conclusions146
Work Issues146
Influence of Chinese Culture146
Paradoxes151
Suggested Training Strategy153
Implications156
Conclusion158
AppendixInterview Guideline160
Notes163
References171
Index183

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