The Works Of Tacitus

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that plan had been altered, to the end that they might meet the formidable approach of the enemy with their united forces. Thus he ordered the legions to proceed by rapid inarches to Cremona, and a detachment to make for IIos- ...
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Works of Tacitus

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Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
that plan had been altered, to the end that they might meet the formidable approach of the enemy with their united forces. Thus he ordered the legions to proceed by rapid inarches to Cremona, and a detachment to make for IIos- tilia.1 Pie himself turned off toward liavenna, under a pretense of conferring with the officers of the fleet ; soon after, ho went to J'ainviuin," that in that retired spot ho might settle the plan of betraying the cause. For Lucilius Bassus, a man who, from a squadron of horse, had been raised by Vitcllius to the, command of two fleets, ono ¬°it liavenna, and the other at Misenum, because he did not immediately obtain the command of the praetorian guards, sought to gratify his unjust resentment by the most flagitious perfidy : nor can it be ascertained whether he corrupted Crecina, or, as is often the case with bad men, namely, that they also resemble each other in their conduct, the samo depraved motives actuated both. 101. Tim historians of the times, who, while the Flavian house possessed tho sovereign power,3 recorded the transactions of this war, have corrupted tho truth, from motives of flattery, in stating that this transaction is attributable to an anxiety to preserve peace, and true patriotism. For myself, I think that, in addition to his inherent inconstancy and contempt for principle, after his treachery to Galba, he was induced to ruin the cause of Vitellius from rivalry and jealousy, lest others should surpass him in influence with that .prince. Caicina, having overtaken tho legions, endeavored by all kinds of artifices to work upon the minds of the centurions and soldiery who were devoted to tho cause of Vitcllius. Bassus, in playing tho same game, experienced less difficulty, as jtho .mariners werepredwposed to throw off their allegiance, ...
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780217288736
  • Publisher: General Books LLC
  • Publication date: 8/10/2009
  • Pages: 220
  • Product dimensions: 7.44 (w) x 9.69 (h) x 0.46 (d)

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that plan had been altered, to the end that they might meet the formidable approach of the enemy with their united forces. Thus he ordered the legions to proceed by rapid marches to Cremona, and a detachment to make for Hos- tilia.1 He himself turned off towards Ravenna, under a pretence of conferring with the officers of the fleet; soon after, he went to Patavium,2 that in that retired spot he might settle the plan of betraying the cause. For Lucilius Bassus, a man who, from a squadron of horse, had been raised by Vitellius to the command of two fleets, one at Ravenna, and the other at Misenum, because he did not immediately obtain the command of the prsetorian guards, sought to gratify his unjust resentment by the most flagitious perfidy: nor can it be ascertained whether he corrupted Csecina, or, as is often the case with bad men, namely, that they also resemble each other in their conduct, the same depraved motives actuated both. 101. The historians of the times, who, while the Flavian house possessed the sovereign power,3 recorded the transactions of this war, have corrupted the truth, from motives of flattery, in stating that this transaction is attributable to an anxiety to preserve peace, and true patriotism. For myself, I think that, in addition to his inherent inconstancy and contempt for principle, after his treachery to Galba, he was induced to ruin the cause of Vitellius from rivalry and jealousy, lest others should surpass him in influence with that prince. Csecina, having overtaken the legions, endeavoured by all kinds of artifices to work upon the minds of the centurions and soldiery who were devoted to the cause of Vitellius. Bassus, in playing the same game,experienced less difficulty, as the mariners were predisposed to throw off their allegiance, from ...
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