The World As It Is: Dispatches on the Myth of Human Progress [NOOK Book]

Overview


Many liberals are disappointed with Barack Obama. Some talk of “betrayal,” while others are writing abject letters to the White House asking the president to come back to his “true self.” Chris Hedges, however, is a progressive who doesn’t feel betrayed. “Obama was and is a brand,” he argues. “He is a product of the Chicago political machine. He has been skillfully packaged by the corporate state.”

In his newest book, Hedges argues that the conscious inertia of the left is ...

See more details below
The World As It Is: Dispatches on the Myth of Human Progress

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$10.49
BN.com price
(Save 38%)$16.99 List Price

Overview


Many liberals are disappointed with Barack Obama. Some talk of “betrayal,” while others are writing abject letters to the White House asking the president to come back to his “true self.” Chris Hedges, however, is a progressive who doesn’t feel betrayed. “Obama was and is a brand,” he argues. “He is a product of the Chicago political machine. He has been skillfully packaged by the corporate state.”

In his newest book, Hedges argues that the conscious inertia of the left is destroying the progressive movement. Inaction and empty moral posturing leads not to change, but to an orgy of self-adulation and self-pity.

Hedges argues that the gravest danger we face as a nation is not from the far right, although the right may well inherit power. Instead, the threat comes from a bankrupt liberal class that has lost the will to fight and the moral courage to stand up for what it espouses.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Former New York Times correspondent Hedges (The Death of the Liberal Class) offers a collection of his recent articles (many culled from his regular column at Truthdig.com), grouped under a handful of topics: "Politics," "Israel and Palestine," "The Middle East," "The Decay of Empire." It's indicative of the longtime war correspondent's experienced eye and commitment to social justice that these areas include subject matter of especially pressing concern, whether the task is understanding the assault underway on organized labor in Wisconsin and elsewhere, liberal disillusionment with Obama, or the dynamics of foreign dictatorships subsidized by the U.S., as in the timely "Inside Egypt" and other dispatches providing vivid background and astute observations on a roiling Middle East. Hedges is equally direct and damning in assessments of Israel's ongoing occupation and colonization of Palestine, including some stirring reportage from within the shadow of the mammoth and destructive separation wall. While things may be changing given the current international upsurge of mass public democratic action, the author's pointed descriptions of the dangers of American "political passivity" deserve careful consideration along with much else in these powerfully written pages. (Apr.)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781568586618
  • Publisher: Nation Books
  • Publication date: 4/12/2011
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 368
  • Sales rank: 339,559
  • File size: 507 KB

Meet the Author


Chris Hedges is a senior fellow at the Nation Institute and the Anschutz Distinguished Fellow at Princeton University. He is the author of numerous best-sellers including War Is a Force That Gives Us Meaning and Empire of Illusion. He currently writes for numerous publications, including Harper’s, The New York Review of Books, Mother Jones and Truthdig, He lives in Princeton, New Jersey.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Introduction xi

Politics

It's Not Going to Be OK 2

The False Idol of Unfettered Capitalism 8

Resist or Become Serfs 14

Buying Brand Obama 19

Hold Your Applause 25

The Truth Alone Will Not Set You Free 28

The Crooks Get the Cash While the Poor Get Screwed 35

The Man in the Mirror 40

So Much for the Promised Land 46

Nader Was Right: Liberals Are Going Nowhere With Obama 52

This Isn't Reform, It's Robbery 57

Go to Pittsburgh, Young Man, and Defy Your Empire 62

Food Is Power, and the Powerful Are Poisoning Us 66

Liberals Are Useless 71

The Creed of Objectivity Killed the News 75

Calling All Rebels 81

How the Corporations Broke Ralph Nader and America, Too 87

Noam Chomsky Has Never Seen Anything Like This 94

BP and the Little Eichmanns 100

This Country Needs a Few Good Communists 105

Freedom in the Grace of the World 110

Obama's Health Care Bill Is Enough to Make You Sick 114

Calling All Future Eaters 120

Do Not Pity the Democrats 125

Israel and Palestine

Mutually Assured Destruction 132

Israel's Barrier to Peace 135

Coveting the Holocaust 157

Bring Down That Wall 161

Israel's Toy Soldiers 164

The World as It Is 168

Party to Murder 172

Lost in the Rubble 178

Israel Crackdown Puts Liberal Jews on the Spot 184

Israel's Racist-in-Chief 189

The Tears of Gaza Must Be Our Tears 192

Formalizing Israel's Land Grab 200

The Middle East

Inside Egypt 206

A Culture of Atrocity 223

Becoming What We Seek to Destroy 227

Iran Had a Democracy Before We Took It Away 232

Opium, Rape, and the American Way 237

Afghanistan's Sham Army 242

The Decay of Empire

Surviving the Fourth of July 250

America's Wars of Self-Destruction 256

Confronting the Terrorist Within 260

Man Is a Cruel Animal 266

We Are Breeding Ourselves to Extinction 271

War Is Sin 275

The American Empire Is Bankrupt 279

Globalization Goes Bankrupt 284

Celebrating Slaughter: War and Collective Amnesia 288

Reality Check from the Brink of Extinction 291

War Is a Hate Crime 296

The Pictures You Aren't Supposed to See 300

The New Secessionists 305

No One Cares 311

They Kill Alex 317

Notes 323

Bibliography 327

Index 329

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 10 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(8)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 10 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 1, 2012

    The Humanity of the Rebel

    The Rebel, is one who opposes authority or restraint, one who breaks with established custom or tradition. Above all, he seeks an Internal Change, a change in the Attitudes, Emotions, and Outlook of the people to whom he is devoted. He often seems to be temperamentally unable to accept success, and the ease it brings. He kicks against the pricks, and when one frontier is conquered, he soon becomes ill-at-ease, pushing on to the new frontier. He is drawn to the unquiet minds and spirits, for he shares their everlasting inability to accept stultifying Control.

    He may, as Socrates did, refer to himself as the Gadfly for the State, the one who keeps the state from settling down into a Complacency, which is the first step towards Decadence. No matter how much the Rebel gives the appearance of being egocentric, or of being on an ego trip, this is but an Illusion. Inwardly, the authentic Rebel is anything but brash.

    True to the meaning of the Rebel, as one who renounces authority, he seeks primarily not the substitution of one political system for another. He may favor such a political change, however it is not his chief goal. He rebels for the sake of a Vision of Life and Society, which he is convinced, is critically important for himself and all others. The Rebel fights not only for the relief of his fellow Man, but also for his Personal Integrity. For him, these are but two sides of the same coin.

    The function of the Rebel is to shake the fixated mores of the rigid order of Civilization, and it is this shaking, though painful, which he believes is necessary, if the society is to be saved from boredom and apathy.

    Civilization begins with a rebellion .... it gets its first Flower from the Rebel.

    The authentic Rebel knows that the silencing of his adversaries, is the last thing he wishes. Their extermination would deprive him, and whomever else, from the uniqueness, the originality, and the capacity for insight, that these enemies, who being Human, also have, and could share with him. If we wish the death of our enemies, we cannot talk about the Community of Man. In our losing of a chance to dialogue with our enemy, we are the poorer.

    In Greek mythology, Prometheus, one of the Titans, steals fire from the Gods on Mount Olympus and then brings it as a gift to Man, marking the birth of Human Civilization. For this rebellion, Zeus sentences him to be chained to Mount Caucasus, where vultures consume his liver during the day, only to have it grow back every night, so that it can be eaten away once again the following day. This is a tale representing the agony of the creative individual, whose nightly rest only resuscitates him so that he can endure his agonies the next day.

    Throughout history, there has been observed a regularity in which society martyrs the rebel in one generation, only to worship him in the next.

    From Rollo May (Existential Psychologist 1909-1994)

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 4, 2012

    I love Chris Hedges

    Essays with his views and disillusions on how the world is. Great reading.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 27, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 4, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 23, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 22, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 25, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 30, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 26, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 19, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 10 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)