The World Don't Owe Me Nothing: The Life and Times of Delta Bluesman Honeyboy Edwards [NOOK Book]

Overview

From sharecropper's son to itinerant bluesman, Honeyboy's life is like a distillation of the classic blues legends. His good friends and musical partners were blues pioneers Charlie Patton, Tommy McClennan, Big Walter Horton, Little Walter Jacobs, and Robert Johnson, among many others. Honeyboy went on the road to play guitar at age 17 under the tutelage of Big Joe Williams.

Historians will delight in the firsthand accounts of his upbringing as a sharecropper's son, the 1927 ...

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The World Don't Owe Me Nothing: The Life and Times of Delta Bluesman Honeyboy Edwards

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Overview

From sharecropper's son to itinerant bluesman, Honeyboy's life is like a distillation of the classic blues legends. His good friends and musical partners were blues pioneers Charlie Patton, Tommy McClennan, Big Walter Horton, Little Walter Jacobs, and Robert Johnson, among many others. Honeyboy went on the road to play guitar at age 17 under the tutelage of Big Joe Williams.

Historians will delight in the firsthand accounts of his upbringing as a sharecropper's son, the 1927 Mississippi River flood, vagrancy laws, makeshift courts in the back of seed stores, plantation life, the racial problems and economics of southern blacks, and the Depression. It also contains comprehensive appendices that provide the history behind Honeyboy's words including information on all the musicians and songs he mentions.

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Editorial Reviews

Washington Post
A valuable record of a way of life that has all but disappeared.
School Library Journal
YAThis biography is a blend of music, history, and masterful storytelling. Edwards does not have any regrets about his 65 plus years as a traveling country-blues musician. Now 82, he lovingly describes community life and family events during this childhood. Arranged chronologically, the book transports readers back to the days of the Depression and the harsh realities of segregation. As a young musician, "Honeyboy" walked, hitchhiked, or hoboed to various destinations under the threat of vagrancy laws. He was arrested by white sheriffs or farmers and sent to the county farm or jail. He doesn't cover up the brutality that he experienced due to class and color. He spins tales of gambling, romance, and classic blues artists, both male and female. Finally he reflects on his God-given talent. He writes vividly of another time and place. Appendixes include brief biographical sketches on blues performers and their songs and Honeyboy's recordings. Black-and-white pictures depict the places and people he mentions. Honeyboy's passion for the blues and his strong recollections will absorb readers.Connie Freeman, Allen County Public Library, Fort Wayne, IN
Booknews
Still touring at age 82, Edwards recounts his musical career, which began at age 17 in riverboats, juke joints, and good-timing houses along the Mississippi Delta and eventually brought him to settle in Chicago in the 1930s. He also talks about his childhood on the plantation, the 1927 Mississippi River flood, vagrancy laws, courts in the back of seed stores, the racial problems and economics of southern blacks, and the Depression. Appendices profile people mentioned, and list songs and recordings. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.
From The Critics
Fans of blues music and musicians will relish this autobiography of Delta bluesman Edwards, which charts his rise to fame and his survival in a critical musical world. His firstperson observations of the changing blues style and field are especially meaningful given that so many blues titles are not written by participants in the field.
From the Publisher

"A valuable record of a way of life that has all but disappeared." —Washington Post

"Magnificent! I’ve been waiting for this book since I was a kid." —Taj Mahal

"The most central contribution to blues history." —Boston Globe

"A deeply moving memoir...one of the last true country blues musicians...[a]story of a troubadour and of survival." —Studs Terkel

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781556529825
  • Publisher: Chicago Review Press, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 3/1/2000
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 304
  • Sales rank: 948,039
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author


David Honeyboy Edwards has been traveling and performing for over 67 years. Already in the Blues Hall of Fame, he was recently inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.
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Read an Excerpt

This vivid oral snapshot of an America that planted the blues is full of rhythmic grace. From the son of a sharecropper to an itinerant bluesman, Honeyboy's stories of good friends Charlie Patton, Big Walter Horton, Little Walter Jacobs, and Robert Johnson are a godsend to blues fans. History buffs will marvel at his unique perspective and firsthand accounts of the 1927 Mississippi River flood, vagrancy laws, makeshift courts in the back of seed stores, plantation life, and the Depression.
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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 22, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    One of two true last links to the 1st generation Bluesmen of the 20th century.

    I know what I am about to write is going to come out very one-sided and biased and there will be many people who will be very insulted, critical, and very upset at my review and quite frankly, I seriously don't care what they think. So if you are sensitive and take things personal, don't read this review. I am writing this from a perspective of a Blues musician, listener, and historian.

    We live in a world where musically, the market is dominated by genres that have lost it's innocence and meaning. Music such as Rap, when it first came out in the 1970's, was raw and real. Now, this art form has become nothing but recycled garbage. This goes the same for Heavy metal, Rock, Punk, and all that is played in the radio can be summed up in 3 words: Capitalism and Commercialism.
    There was a time in the United States when the rural south, with all the faults and excellencies that existed such as racism, predjudice, discrimination, hatred, and political unrest, emerged a true American art form known as the Blues. Lightnin' Hopkins put it best when he said: "The Blues is in everyone and everywhere. You can talk about the Blues in everyway. That your broke. That your girl left you. And when you get these feelings, you can tell the whole world that you ain't got nothin' but the Blues." These men and women, were born into poverty, didn't have a dime to their name, they were born into the Blues. They struggled to hobo and travel from place to place to earn a living playing in street corners and juke joints.
    David Honeyboy Edwards was one of the first generation Bluesmen that lived the Blues and played with people such as Charley Patton, Son House, and was a close friend to Robert Johnson. In this book, he documents road stories and tells about his struggle and hardship he had to endure throughout the years to get to where he is now. He and Pinetop Perkins, both in their mid-90's, are the last two remaining links to the 20th Century Bluesmen. They should both be declared as official living legends and National treasures to the United States. If I was in charge of this country, I would make this book a mandatory read in History, English, and music classes.
    The problem with young people today, is the fact that either they don't know about Honeyboy Edwards and the Blues, they can't relate to it, or they don't want to know about it. It's referred to as "old people's music" and has no relevance to their lives because most young people today don't understand what hard-work is and can't relate to the Blues because they are given things in life or they want fast material things but instead, they don't want to work for it. If people were to read this book, they would understand where their music came from and also understand the value of life and what they have. I find it surprising that given all that going on in the world, people would have alot of Blues to sing and can relate to it even more, but they aren't. Now that's a shame.
    The title of this book is true in it's meaning: The world doesn't owe you anything. You owe it to yourself to make something of yourself.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 5, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 9, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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