The World of Shannara

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Overview

All the wonders of Shannara have been gathered into one indispensable volume in which Terry Brooks shares candid views on his creation. This completely updated edition includes new entries on the High Druid of Shannara and Genesis of Shannara series, as well as the connection between Shannara and the Word and the Void trilogy. Illustrated throughout with full-color paintings and black-and-white drawings by artists David Cherry and Rob Alexander, this comprehensive guide ventures behind the scenes to explore the ...

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Overview

All the wonders of Shannara have been gathered into one indispensable volume in which Terry Brooks shares candid views on his creation. This completely updated edition includes new entries on the High Druid of Shannara and Genesis of Shannara series, as well as the connection between Shannara and the Word and the Void trilogy. Illustrated throughout with full-color paintings and black-and-white drawings by artists David Cherry and Rob Alexander, this comprehensive guide ventures behind the scenes to explore the history, the people, the places, the major events, and the magic of one of the world's greatest fantasy epics.

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Editorial Reviews

VOYA
The detailed complexity of established fantasy worlds is among their most compelling and most limiting factors. Readers versed in the lore and legends of such worlds relish arcane historical tidbits and sprawling family trees. Newcomers, however, often find these worlds unfathomable. For this reason, this volume is likely to appeal only to loyal followers of Brooks's series, serving as a sort of encyclopedia to the historical, geographical, and magical culture of the Shannara novels. The fifteen chapters are organized primarily by region and give a brief overview of each of the Four Lands as well as discuss the various races that inhabit them and the chief cities or sites of each area. Inset boxes provide snapshot biographies of important persons, explanations of particularly potent magical items, and descriptions of unusual creatures. Frequent illustrations by David Cheny add color and visual appeal to the book. Although some fans will enjoy the detailed discussions of favorite characters or maps of important fortresses, others might regret that all of the new back stories and explanatory material are the work of Patterson, Brooks's chosen collaborator, rather than that of the author himself. Instead of investing in this volume, most libraries can best serve readers by making certain that plenty of copies of the original Shannara novels themselves are available. Illus. VOYA CODES: 3Q 2P S A/YA (Readable without serious defects; For the YA with a special interest in the subject; Senior High, defined as grades 10 to 12; Adult and Young Adult). 2001, Ballantine, 224p,
— Megan Isaac
School Library Journal
Adult/High School-Number one on The New York Times best-seller list more than 30 years ago, Shannara (Del Rey) remains a masterpiece in fantasy literature. This volume, a guidebook to the "Shannara" epic, is beautifully illustrated with full-color and black-and-white drawings and includes descriptions of all the major characters with details of homelands including histories. The foreword was written by Brooks, giving his blessings to and thoughts on the project. Looking forward into the future and not interested in defining the past, he was convinced by friends that the time was right for a summary of his work. For anyone who wondered about the fortress Southwatch, there is a history. The maps, sketches, and detailed descriptions provide a blueprint, bringing the places to life. New and old fans will love reading about and actually seeing Brooks's druids, creepers, gnomes, wizards, and more come alive in the pages of this book. Hours of reading fun are packed in this volume.-Linda G. Sinclair, Alexandria Library, VA Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780345483881
  • Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 8/30/2005
  • Pages: 256
  • Product dimensions: 11.17 (w) x 8.77 (h) x 0.87 (d)

Meet the Author

Terry Brooks
Terry Brooks is the New York Times bestselling author of more than twenty-five books, including the Genesis of Shannara novels Armageddon’s Children and The Elves of Cintra; The Sword of Shannara; the Voyage of the Jerle Shannara trilogy: Ilse Witch, Antrax, and Morgawr; the High Druid of Shannara trilogy: Jarka Ruus, Tanequil, and Straken; the nonfiction book Sometimes the Magic Works: Lessons from a Writing Life; and the novel based upon the screenplay and story by George Lucas, Star Wars®: Episode I The Phantom Menace.™ His novels Running with the Demon and A Knight of the Word were selected by the Rocky Mountain News as two of the best science fiction/fantasy novels of the twentieth century. The author was a practicing attorney for many years but now writes full-time. He lives with his wife, Judine, in the Pacific Northwest.

Biography

"I found my way to fantasy/adventure. When I got there, I knew I'd found a home," said Terence Dean Brooks, creator of the blockbuster, New York Times bestselling Shannara, Landover, and Word & Void series. Not only is Brooks at home in the highly competitive realm of fantasy literature, many would call him the genre’s modern-day patriarch – Tolkien’s successor. While that title is debatable, Brooks is, without a doubt, one of the world’s most prolific and successful authors of otherworld (and our world) fantasy. Few writers in any genre can boast a more entertaining collection of work – and a more ravenous and loyal fan base -- than can Terry Brooks.

The most rewarding aspect to writing for Brooks is “when someone who never read a book reads [one of mine] and says that the experience changed everything and got them reading.” Because of his very engaging, quick-flowing writing style, countless numbers of young people have been introduced to the wonderful world of reading through Brooks’s adventures. The miraculous thing, however, is that these same fans – whether they’re now 20, 30, or 40 years old – still devour each new release like a starving man would a steak dinner. Credit Brooks’s boundless imagination, endearing characters, fresh storylines and underlying complexities for keeping his older, more discerning audience hooked.

Brooks began writing when he was just ten years old, but he did not discover fantasy until much later. As a high school student he jumped from writing science fiction to westerns to adventure to nonfiction, unable to settle on one form. That changed when, at the age of 21, Brooks was introduced to J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings. Tolkien provided Brooks with a forum “that would allow him to release onto paper his own ideas about life, love, and the wonder that fills his world," according to his web site.

In 1977, after six trying years, Brooks published novel his first novel, The Sword of Shannara. And quickly it gave him – and his publisher (the newly created Ballantine imprint, Del Rey) – quite a thrill; the fantasy adventure featuring the young Halfling, Shea Ohmsford; the mysterious wizard Allanon; Flick, the trusty companion; and the demonic Warlock Lord, was not only well received -- it was a smash, spending over five months on The New York Times bestseller list. In 1982 Brooks released the follow-up, The Elfstones of Shannara (which Brooks says may be his favorite), to equal success. He closed out the initial trilogy in 1985 with The Wishsong of Shannara, and has since completed two more Shannara sets, The Heritage of Shannara books and the Voyage of the Jerle Shannara books.

As fans of Brooks know, the man doesn’t like to stay put. “I lived in Illinois for the first 42 years of my life, and I told myself when I left in 1986 that I would never live any one place again,” Brooks said. He now spends his time between his homes in Seattle and Hawaii; he and his wife also spend a great deal of time on the road each year connecting with the fans. These same nomadic tendencies are also apparent in his writing. Instead of staying comfortably within his proven, bestselling Shannara series, Terry frequently takes chances, steps outside, and tries something new. His marvelous Landover and Word & Void series are the results. While both are vastly different from Shannara, they are equally compelling. Word & Void – a contemporary, dark urban fantasy series set in a fantasy-touched Illinois – is quite possibly Brooks’s most acclaimed series. The Rocky Mountain News called the series’ first two books (Running with the Demon and The Knight of the Word “two of the finest science fiction/fantasy novels of the 20th century.”

Good To Know

When The Sword of Shannara hit The New York Times bestseller list, Brooks became the first modern fantasy author to achieve that pinnacle.

The Sword of Shannara was also the first work of fiction to ever hit The New York Times trade paperback bestseller list. Thanks to a faithful and growing fan base, the books continue to reach the list.

Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace was not Terry's first novelization. He also novelized Steven Spielberg's 1991 movie, Hook.

Brooks’s The Phantom Menace novelization is also not his only connection to George Lucas. Both The Sword of Shannara and the original Star Wars novel, A New Hope, were edited by Judy Lynn del Rey and published in the same year (1977) to blockbuster success.

The Sword of Shannara was initially turned down by DAW Books. Instead, DAW sent Terry to Lester del Rey, who recognized Terry’s blockbuster potential and bought it. And the rest, they say, is history.

Brooks’s influences include: J.R.R. Tolkien, Alexander Dumas, James Fenimore Cooper, Sir Walter Scott, Robert Louis Stevenson, Edgar Rice Burroughs, and Mallory's Morte d'Arthur.

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    1. Also Known As:
      Terence Dean Brooks (full name)
    2. Hometown:
      Pacific Northwest and Hawaii
    1. Date of Birth:
      January 8, 1944
    2. Place of Birth:
      Sterling, Illinois
    1. Education:
      B.A. in English, Hamilton College, 1966; J.D., Washington and Lee University
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt

Bremen: First Mystic Druid

The first Druid to actually succeed in promoting the combination of the study of magic with other disciplines was the Druid Bremen. Unfortunately, he succeeded primarily because he and his followers were the only Druids to survive Paranor’s fall during the Second War of the Races. Bremen is best known for his role in creating the legendary Sword of Shannara, a magic-imbued weapon he designed to defeat the Warlock Lord.

Abandoned by his parents shortly after birth, Bremen was raised by his grandfather, a skilled metalworker, who was probably responsible for both the boy’s understanding of metallurgy and his dedication. Always searching for knowledge, Bremen was a student of history and ancient tongues, disciplines that made him an ideal candidate for the Druid Council.

He joined the council as a young man and became active in assisting in the evolution and development of the Races. Over time, he watched as the Druid Council began to pull back from the rest of the world, disillusioned by its failure to re-create the old sciences.

Frustrated by the setbacks, Bremen began to look to magic as a possible alternative. In his early journal entries, now part of the Druid Histories, Bremen wrote: “Magic could provide a more manageable and durable form of power than that found through science. It has untapped potential beyond that of the sciences, even at the levels of scientific advancement found in the Old World.”

At that time, the study of the arcane arts was permissible but discouraged. Magic was to be treated as a curiosity only, not a serious discipline. One group of Druids had alreadybeen exiled for their insistence on the use of magic as a tool to make the Druids the masters of all the Races. Bremen was warned against traversing the same path. The fact that magic had been used in the First War of the Races to ill effect did nothing to help his cause. He wrote, “It is quite unnatural to me to discard a possibility simply because it has once failed. Do we discard science because we have failed to re-create the wonders of the Old World? Of course not. Why then discard magic just because it was once blatantly misused? If we discard every possibility that is not immediately successful, we are left with no possibilities at all.” He believed that magic could be harnessed and controlled with enough discipline and training.

A few of his fellows apparently agreed with him, but they were in the minority. Unwilling to risk censure, they backed away from the matter. Bremen did not. Eventually his insistence on considering magic a valid and serious alternative to science earned him banishment from the council.

After his banishment, Bremen traveled to the Westland to study with the Elves, where he lived for many years. He believed the Elven libraries, which had the greatest collection of ancient writings in lost Elven dialects, held the secret to understanding the old magic from the time of Faerie. The Elves embraced Bremen and his search, since they too were interested in rediscovering abilities that had been lost. Certain magics, such as some degree of the Druid Sleep, were skills Bremen already practiced. But with his knowledge of ancient tongues, he was able to uncover treasures of magical lore and decipher otherwise discarded texts that increased his knowledge and abilities far beyond what he would have gained at Paranor.

Inspired from his years of success with the Elves, Bremen left them to travel to other lands, seeking whatever lost bits of magic he could find, in much the same way as the early Druids had searched out the texts and lore related to the Old World sciences. According to his journals, he found an amazing amount of lost magic, though none as greatly concentrated or as highly developed as that within the Westland. In many cases, the magic he found was completely foreign to those who used it.

At some point in his travels, probably while in the Southland, Bremen began to suspect that the First War of the Races had not actually been organized by the Race of Men who appeared to have started it. He found evidence that the leader–referred to only as Brona, which means “master” in Gnome dialect–who had long been thought by the Druids of his order to be a mythic figurehead, was in fact a real being. Bremen suspected he was the leader of the Druids who had broken from the council and renounced their brotherhood over the question of magic many years before. He also found evidence that Brona was still alive, despite the impossible number of years that had passed, and was planning another assault on the Four Lands.

Unlike the rest of the Druids, Bremen had no trouble believing Brona could still be alive, because his own life had been lengthened beyond a natural span by his use of the Druid Sleep. But he knew he would have to have proof before the council would believe him.

He spent the next several years tracking the elusive Brona, going so far as to travel to the Skull Kingdom. Upon his return to Paranor, both Bremen and his information were rejected by the council. He left with only the few who believed his warning of impending attack. Shortly after his visit, Paranor fell to the armies of the Warlock Lord, betrayed from within. Bremen and those who left with him–the Dwarf Warrior Druid Risca, the Elf Tay Trefenwyd, and the apprentice Mareth–were the only survivors of the order.

Before he left, Bremen provided the magic that saved the Druid Histories from the invaders. The opened portion of the Druid Histories also credits him for preventing a long-term occupation by the Warlock Lord by triggering the magic of the Druid’s Well.

By default, the death of the Druids left Bremen as the acting High Druid. But while he did rescue the Elit Druin after Paranor’s fall, he never formally accepted the title. He used the medallion in the forging of the Sword of Shannara, the magical weapon used to end the Second War of the Races and the War of the Warlock Lord.

Of the Druids who followed Bremen from Paranor, only Mareth survived the war. She declined to complete her training as a Druid, leaving Bremen as the last of the Druids, even as he was the first to successfully balance magic with the good of the Races. He adopted a young man known only as Allanon, whom he had befriended during the war, and took him as apprentice, heir, and eventually son.

Paranor vanished only a few years after the war, and some scholars now believe that Bremen, with his knowledge of magics, was responsible for that disappearance.

While many consider Bremen to have died approximately three years after the end of the Second War of the Races, Allanon’s journal records that he did not die, but instead “doomed himself to an existence of half-life that may not end for all eternity” by entering the mysterious Hadeshorn. This interpretation is also found within the diaries of Brin Ohmsford, where she records seeing an apparition that was identified as Bremen while at the Chard Rush, decades after Bremen’s supposed death.

Copyright 2001 by Teresa Patterson and Terry Brooks
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Table of Contents

Foreword Terry Brooks Brooks, Terry

Introduction The Lost Legacy

Descent into Darkness: The Old World and the Great Wars 2

Paranor: The Druid's Keep 7

Within the Walls: A Tour of Paranor 16

The Druids: Legacy of Mystery 23

Bremen: First Mystic Druid 24

Allanon: Protector of the Four Lands 27

Walker Boh: Dark Uncle 29

Cogline: The Lapsed Druid 33

Realms of the Dead 36

The Hadeshorn 36

Hall of Kings 40

The Southland: History of the Federation 49

History of the Southland 49

The Southland: Cities of the Southland 61

Arishaig 61

Wayford and Stern 63

Dechtera 64

Highlands of Leah 66

The City of Leah 70

Beyond the Highlands 72

Shady Vale 73

Two Families: A Legacy of Courage 76

The Ohmsfords 81

The Leahs 86

The Borderlands: Crossroads of the Four Lands 91

The Border Legion of Callahorn 98

The Borderlands: Fortresses of Trade 103

Tyrsis 104

Varfleet 111

Kern 113

Beyond the Cities 114

The Northland: Land of Trolls and Warlocks 117

The Skull Kingdom 121

Trolls 126

Urdas 132

The Eastland: Land of Dwarves and Gnomes 133

Dwarves 134

Land of the Dwarves 137

Gnomes 144

Mwellrets 150

The Westland: Land of the Elves 158

History of the Elves 158

Arborlon 168

The Fortress of the Chew Magna 173

The Matted Brakes 174

The Westland: Guardians of the Air 177

Sky Elves 177

Rovers 183

March Brume 185

Airships 185

The Wilderun 190

The Lands Beyond 193

Flay Creech 193

Shatterstone 194

Shrike Island 194

Mephitic 195

Ice Henge 195

Morrowindl 196

A Legacy of Magic, Darkness, and Light 197

The King of the Silver River 198

The StoneKing 200

Maw Grint 200

Quickening 201

Morag and Mallenroh 202

The Morgawr 203

The Dagda Mor 204

The Changeling 205

The Reaper 205

Parkasia: Voyage to a New World 207

Castledown 210

Land of the Rindge 215

The Aleuthra Ark Mountain Range 217

The Druids of the New Order 221

The Rise and Fall of the Third Druid Order 221

Shadeaa' Ru and the Renegade Druids of the Third Druid Council 229

Changing Life in the Four Lands 233

The Federation-Free-born War 234

The Expanding Frontier 238

Stridegate 243

The Land of the Forbidding 248

The Jarka Ruus 248

Creatures of the Dark World 256

Rediscovering the Old World 260

The Seeds of Destruction 261

Demons of the Void 261

Knights of the Word 264

Nest Freemark 267

The Fall of the Old World 272

Freaks and Mutants 272

The Once-Men 274

The Elves 279

Index 281

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First Chapter

The World of Shannara


By Terry Brooks and Teresa Patterson

Random House

Terry Brooks and Teresa Patterson
All right reserved.

ISBN: 034548388X


Chapter One

Bremen: First Mystic Druid

The first Druid to actually succeed in promoting the combination of the study of magic with other disciplines was the Druid Bremen. Unfortunately, he succeeded primarily because he and his followers were the only Druids to survive Paranor's fall during the Second War of the Races. Bremen is best known for his role in creating the legendary Sword of Shannara, a magic-imbued weapon he designed to defeat the Warlock Lord.

Abandoned by his parents shortly after birth, Bremen was raised by his grandfather, a skilled metalworker, who was probably responsible for both the boy's understanding of metallurgy and his dedication. Always searching for knowledge, Bremen was a student of history and ancient tongues, disciplines that made him an ideal candidate for the Druid Council.

He joined the council as a young man and became active in assisting in the evolution and development of the Races. Over time, he watched as the Druid Council began to pull back from the rest of the world, disillusioned by its failure to re-create the old sciences.

Frustrated by the setbacks, Bremen began to look to magic as a possible alternative. In his early journal entries, now part of the Druid Histories, Bremen wrote: “Magic could provide a more manageable and durable form of power than that found through science. It has untapped potential beyond that of the sciences, even at the levels of scientific advancement found in the Old World.”

At that time, the study of the arcane arts was permissible but discouraged. Magic was to be treated as a curiosity only, not a serious discipline. One group of Druids had already been exiled for their insistence on the use of magic as a tool to make the Druids the masters of all the Races. Bremen was warned against traversing the same path. The fact that magic had been used in the First War of the Races to ill effect did nothing to help his cause. He wrote, “It is quite unnatural to me to discard a possibility simply because it has once failed. Do we discard science because we have failed to re-create the wonders of the Old World? Of course not. Why then discard magic just because it was once blatantly misused? If we discard every possibility that is not immediately successful, we are left with no possibilities at all.” He believed that magic could be harnessed and controlled with enough discipline and training.

A few of his fellows apparently agreed with him, but they were in the minority. Unwilling to risk censure, they backed away from the matter. Bremen did not. Eventually his insistence on considering magic a valid and serious alternative to science earned him banishment from the council.

After his banishment, Bremen traveled to the Westland to study with the Elves, where he lived for many years. He believed the Elven libraries, which had the greatest collection of ancient writings in lost Elven dialects, held the secret to understanding the old magic from the time of Faerie. The Elves embraced Bremen and his search, since they too were interested in rediscovering abilities that had been lost. Certain magics, such as some degree of the Druid Sleep, were skills Bremen already practiced. But with his knowledge of ancient tongues, he was able to uncover treasures of magical lore and decipher otherwise discarded texts that increased his knowledge and abilities far beyond what he would have gained at Paranor.

Inspired from his years of success with the Elves, Bremen left them to travel to other lands, seeking whatever lost bits of magic he could find, in much the same way as the early Druids had searched out the texts and lore related to the Old World sciences. According to his journals, he found an amazing amount of lost magic, though none as greatly concentrated or as highly developed as that within the Westland. In many cases, the magic he found was completely foreign to those who used it.

At some point in his travels, probably while in the Southland, Bremen began to suspect that the First War of the Races had not actually been organized by the Race of Men who appeared to have started it. He found evidence that the leader–referred to only as Brona, which means “master” in Gnome dialect–who had long been thought by the Druids of his order to be a mythic figurehead, was in fact a real being. Bremen suspected he was the leader of the Druids who had broken from the council and renounced their brotherhood over the question of magic many years before. He also found evidence that Brona was still alive, despite the impossible number of years that had passed, and was planning another assault on the Four Lands.

Unlike the rest of the Druids, Bremen had no trouble believing Brona could still be alive, because his own life had been lengthened beyond a natural span by his use of the Druid Sleep. But he knew he would have to have proof before the council would believe him.

He spent the next several years tracking the elusive Brona, going so far as to travel to the Skull Kingdom. Upon his return to Paranor, both Bremen and his information were rejected by the council. He left with only the few who believed his warning of impending attack. Shortly after his visit, Paranor fell to the armies of the Warlock Lord, betrayed from within. Bremen and those who left with him–the Dwarf Warrior Druid Risca, the Elf Tay Trefenwyd, and the apprentice Mareth–were the only survivors of the order.

Before he left, Bremen provided the magic that saved the Druid Histories from the invaders. The opened portion of the Druid Histories also credits him for preventing a long-term occupation by the Warlock Lord by triggering the magic of the Druid's Well.

By default, the death of the Druids left Bremen as the acting High Druid. But while he did rescue the Elit Druin after Paranor's fall, he never formally accepted the title. He used the medallion in the forging of the Sword of Shannara, the magical weapon used to end the Second War of the Races and the War of the Warlock Lord.

Of the Druids who followed Bremen from Paranor, only Mareth survived the war. She declined to complete her training as a Druid, leaving Bremen as the last of the Druids, even as he was the first to successfully balance magic with the good of the Races. He adopted a young man known only as Allanon, whom he had befriended during the war, and took him as apprentice, heir, and eventually son.

Paranor vanished only a few years after the war, and some scholars now believe that Bremen, with his knowledge of magics, was responsible for that disappearance.

While many consider Bremen to have died approximately three years after the end of the Second War of the Races, Allanon's journal records that he did not die, but instead “doomed himself to an existence of half-life that may not end for all eternity” by entering the mysterious Hadeshorn. This interpretation is also found within the diaries of Brin Ohmsford, where she records seeing an apparition that was identified as Bremen while at the Chard Rush, decades after Bremen's supposed death.



Excerpted from The World of Shannara by Terry Brooks and Teresa Patterson Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 18 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 18 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2012

    Not in the Legends of Shannara!

    This is a companion book. Not the next in the legends series. My mistake... Any idea where my book is??? Any input would be helpful. Also don't buy this if your looking to finish the stiry

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 9, 2010

    Just OK.

    This book was OK. I received it as a gift. Not sure if I would have bought it on my own. Major criticisms are that I didn't feel enough space was given to the pre-Shannara events and I was very disappointed in the quality and quantity of maps.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 15, 2005

    Terry Brooks - A Master Among Authors

    I first encountered The Shannara Series as a preteen. I thought it would be a little beyond my understanding, but as I got into this particular series I found my place in literature! I started with the Wishsong of Shannara and realized towards the end of the book that there was whole back story. I promptly closed the book and went in search of the beginning. Needless to say I'm glad I did! I found a whole new world I could escape into as a child, and a new well of creativity to sip from as an adult. I continue to be a fan of his writings in general (The Word and The Void Trilogy, The Magic Kingdom of Landover series) and any and every chance I get I'm sure to tell of how great I think he is to all my friends and loved ones. I've started the Voyage of The Jerle Shannara Trilogy, and anticipate getting to the High Druid Trilogy. To date I have gotten my sisters, my mom, and quite a few friends to read the first Shannara book, and they continue to crave more. No one can believe how real he makes it appear to be. We've all seen the movie Legend, and the Star Wars series, these books for me are right up there with them. Thank you Terry Brooks for creating a world where anything is possible and good triumphs over evil in the end.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 1, 2002

    an amazing tale of facts and stories

    Tales of great races and the places they live amazingly deatailed. A sure winner soon to be one of the best author's of the year and 20th century!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 20, 2001

    A Great Companion book!

    The world of shannara is much like a history book as it is a source book. Rich illustrations add to the compelling details about the major characters and events of the Shannara series. You also learn new facts and legends as well. a must have for any Shannara fan.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 8, 2012

    very good and interston - you must check it out!!

    Terry Brooks writes good books

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 3, 2011

    Highly recommend!

    I love these books - the author has such a brilliant imagination that I just can't put his books down. Awesome reading material!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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