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The World Set Free
     

The World Set Free

3.3 8
by H. G. Wells
 

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In this thought-provoking masterpiece, H. G. Wells predicts the invention of the atomic bomb, which inadvertently leads to mass destruction and forces the world to "start over."

Overview

In this thought-provoking masterpiece, H. G. Wells predicts the invention of the atomic bomb, which inadvertently leads to mass destruction and forces the world to "start over."

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781480121874
Publisher:
CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date:
10/16/2012
Pages:
146
Sales rank:
761,813
Product dimensions:
6.69(w) x 9.61(h) x 0.31(d)

Meet the Author

Herbert George Wells (21 September 1866 - 13 August 1946)-known as H. G. Wells, was a prolific English writer in many genres, including the novel, history, politics, and social commentary, and textbooks and rules for war games. Wells is now best remembered for his science fiction novels, and is called the father of science fiction, along with Jules Verne and Hugo Gernsback. His most notable science fiction works include The Time Machine (1895), The Island of Doctor Moreau (1896), The Invisible Man (1897), and The War of the Worlds (1898). He was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature four times.
Wells's earliest specialised training was in biology, and his thinking on ethical matters took place in a specifically and fundamentally Darwinian context. He was also from an early date an outspoken socialist, often (but not always, as at the beginning of the First World War) sympathising with pacifist views. His later works became increasingly political and didactic, and he wrote little science fiction, while he sometimes indicated on official documents that his profession was that of journalist. Novels like Kipps and The History of Mr Polly, which describe lower-middle-class life, led to the suggestion, when they were published, that he was a worthy successor to Charles Dickens, but Wells described a range of social strata and even attempted, in Tono-Bungay (1909), a diagnosis of English society as a whole. A diabetic, in 1934 Wells co-founded the charity The Diabetic Association (known today as Diabetes UK).
In 1891, Wells married his cousin Isabel Mary Wells. The couple agreed to separate in 1894 when he fell in love with one of his students, Amy Catherine Robbins (later known as Jane), whom he married in 1895. Poor health took him to Sandgate, near Folkestone, where in 1901 he constructed a large family home: Spade House. He had two sons with Jane: George Philip (known as "Gip") in 1901 (died 1985) and Frank Richard in 1903 (died 1982).
With his wife Jane's consent, Wells had affairs with a number of women, including the American birth control activist Margaret Sanger, adventurer and writer Odette Keun, Soviet spy Moura Budberg and novelist Elizabeth von Arnim. In 1909 he had a daughter, Anna-Jane, with the writer Amber Reeves, whose parents, William and Maud Pember Reeves, he had met through the Fabian Society; and in 1914 a son, Anthony West (1914-1987), by the novelist and feminist Rebecca West, 26 years his junior.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
September 21, 1866
Date of Death:
August 13, 1946
Place of Birth:
Bromley, Kent, England
Place of Death:
London, England
Education:
Normal School of Science, London, England

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The World Set Free 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
My mom made me read this!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Have not read yet might be good becuse the other books he wrote were good
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
As you all now everybody can write reviews.