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World Trade Law after Neoliberalism: Reimagining the Global Economic Order

Overview

The rise of economic liberalism in the latter stages of the 20th century coincided with a fundamental transformation of international economic governance, especially through the law of the World Trade Organization. In this book, Andrew Lang provides a new account of this transformation, and considers its enduring implications for international law. Against the commonly-held idea that 'neoliberal' policy prescriptions were encoded into WTO law, Lang argues that the last decades of the 20th century saw a ...

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World Trade Law after Neoliberalism: Reimagining the Global Economic Order

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Overview

The rise of economic liberalism in the latter stages of the 20th century coincided with a fundamental transformation of international economic governance, especially through the law of the World Trade Organization. In this book, Andrew Lang provides a new account of this transformation, and considers its enduring implications for international law. Against the commonly-held idea that 'neoliberal' policy prescriptions were encoded into WTO law, Lang argues that the last decades of the 20th century saw a reinvention of the international trade regime, and a reconstitution of its internal structures of knowledge.

In addition, the book explores the way that resistance to economic liberalism was expressed and articulated over the same period in other areas of international law, most prominently international human rights law. It considers the promise and limitations of this form of 'inter-regime' contestation, arguing that measures to ensure greater collaboration and cooperation between regimes may fail in their objectives if they are not accompanied by a simultaneous destabilization of each regime's structures of knowledge and characteristic features. With that in mind, the book contributes to a full and productive contestation of the nature and purpose of global economic governance.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Langs contribution is one of the most legally far-reaching, methodologically acute, and sociologically attentive accounts thus far." —Michael Fakhri, European Journal of International Law

"Lang has pointed us down an important road. Lets go down it." —Simon Lester, Journal of International Economic Law

"This book laudably challenges the comfortable story the WTO likes to hear about itself."
—Professor JHH Weiler, NYU School of Law

"A path-breaking study which no-one interested in world trade and global justice can afford to ignore. Lang's new history of the 'neoliberal turn' in international trade law has far-reaching implications for how we reorient trade for the benefit of humanity as a whole. If 'trade linkage' ('trade and human rights', etc.) has been the dominant approach, he shows that our real challenge is to renew the simple - but, in the WTO, largely discredited - idea that trade governance implicates not just private interests, but collective purposes as well. This is a marvellous book, written with unpretentious grace and pellucid clarity." —Susan Marks, Professor of International Law, London School of Economics

"World Trade Law After Neoliberalism is an imaginative and wide-ranging reassessment of the foundations and the prospects of the world trading system. The author, a fine legal scholar with an excellent grasp of the social science of international institutions, places the achievements of WTO law and jurisprudence in a broad perspective, informed by many of the tumultuous political and economic events of recent times. With the collapse of the WTO Doha negotiations imminent, this book is must-reading for anyone seeking to understand what has happened and where we go from here." —Robert Howse, Lloyd C. Nelson Professor of International Law, NYU School of Law

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780199674398
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  • Publication date: 3/22/2013
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 416
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Andrew Lang is a Senior Lecturer in Law at the London School of Economics, teaching public international law, with a specialty in international economic law. He is a co-founder, with Colin Picker, of the Society of International Economic Law. He sits on the Editorial Boards of the Modern Law Review, the Journal of International Economic Law and the Law and Development Review, and is a Book Review Editor for the International and Comparative Law Quarterly. He has taught on the World Trade Institute's Masters of International Law and Economics (MILE) program, the University of Barcelona's IELPO course, as well as the IIEM Academy of International Trade Law in Macau. Andrew has a combined BA/ LLB degree from the University of Sydney, receiving the University Medal in both degrees. His PhD is from the University of Cambridge, graduating in May 2005. From 2004-2006, he was the Gott Research Fellow in Law at Trinity Hall, at the University of Cambridge.

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Table of Contents

1. Introduction
Regime encounters: trade and human rights
2. Trade and Human Rights in Historical Perspective
3. The Global Justice Movement
4. Inter-regime Contestation
5. The Limits of Coherence
The trade regime and the neoliberal turn
6. Against Objectivism
7. Embedded Liberalism and Purposive Law
8. Neoliberalism and the Formal-technical Turn
9. Trade in Services
Conclusion
10. Conclusion: After Neoliberalism?

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