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The Worldly Philosophers: The Lives, Times And Ideas Of The Great Economic Thinkers

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Overview

The bestselling classic that examines the history of economic thought from Adam Smith to Karl Marx—“all the economic lore most general readers conceivably could want to know, served up with a flourish” (The New York Times).

The Worldly Philosophers not only enables us to see more deeply into our history but helps us better understand our own times. In this seventh edition, Robert L. Heilbroner provides a new theme that connects thinkers as diverse as Adam Smith and Karl Marx. ...

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Overview

The bestselling classic that examines the history of economic thought from Adam Smith to Karl Marx—“all the economic lore most general readers conceivably could want to know, served up with a flourish” (The New York Times).

The Worldly Philosophers not only enables us to see more deeply into our history but helps us better understand our own times. In this seventh edition, Robert L. Heilbroner provides a new theme that connects thinkers as diverse as Adam Smith and Karl Marx. The theme is the common focus of their highly varied ideas—namely, the search to understand how a capitalist society works. It is a focus never more needed than in this age of confusing economic headlines.

In a bold new concluding chapter entitled “The End of the Worldly Philosophy?” Heilbroner reminds us that the word “end” refers to both the purpose and limits of economics. This chapter conveys a concern that today’s increasingly “scientific” economics may overlook fundamental social and political issues that are central to economics. Thus, unlike its predecessors, this new edition provides not just an indispensable illumination of our past but a call to action for our future.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“A brilliant achievement.”
John Kenneth Galbraith

“If ever a book answered a crying need, this one does. Here is all the economic lore most general readers conceivably could want to know, served up with a flourish by a man who writes with immense vigor and skill, who has a rare gift for simplifying complexities.”
The New York Times

“Robert Heilbroner's The Worldly Philosophers is a living classic, both because he makes us see that the ideas of the great economists remain fresh and important for our times and because his own brilliant writing forces us to reach out into the future.”
—Leonard Silk

The Worldly Philosophers, quite simply put, is a classic....None of us can know where we are coming from unless we know the sources of the great ideas that permeate our thinking. The Worldly Philosophers gives us a clear understanding of the economic ideas that influence us whether or not we have read the great economic thinkers.”
—Lester Thurow

“Sinclair Lewis's Arrowsmith inspired several readers to become Nobel laureates in biology. Robert Heilbroner's new edition of The Worldly Philosophers will inspire a new generation of economists.”
—Paul Samuelson

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780684862149
  • Publisher: Touchstone
  • Publication date: 8/28/1999
  • Edition description: 7TH, REVISED
  • Edition number: 7
  • Pages: 368
  • Sales rank: 1,374
  • Product dimensions: 5.60 (w) x 8.40 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Robert L. Heilbroner is the Norman Thomas Professor of Economics, Emeritus, at The New School for Social Research and is the author of more than twenty books. He lives in New York City.

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Read an Excerpt

Introduction

This is a book about a handful of men with a curious claim to fame. By all the rules of schoolboy history books, they were nonentities: they commanded no armies, sent no men to their deaths, ruled no empires, took little part in history-making decisions. A few of them achieved renown, but none was ever a national hero; a few were roundly abused, but none was ever quite a national villain. Yet what they did was more decisive for history than many acts of statesmen who basked in brighter glory, often more profoundly disturbing than the shuttling of armies back and forth across frontiers, more powerful for good and bad than the edicts of kings and legislatures. It was this: they shaped and swayed men's minds.

And because he who enlists a man's mind wields a power even greater than the sword or the scepter, these men shaped and swayed the world. Few of them ever lifted a finger in action; they worked, in the main, as scholars — quietly, inconspicuously, and without much regard for what the world had to say about them. But they left in their train shattered empires and exploded continents; they buttressed and undermined political regimes; they set class against class and even nation against nation — not because they plotted mischief, but because of the extraordinary power of their ideas.

Who were these men? We know them as the Great Economists. But what is strange is how little we know about them. One would think that in a world torn by economic problems, a world that constantly worries about economic affairs and talks of economic issues, the great economists would be as familiar as the great philosophers or statesmen. Instead they are only shadowy figures of the past, and the matters they so passionately debated are regarded with a kind of distant awe. Economics, it is said, is undeniably important, but it is cold and difficult, and best left to those who are at home in abstruse realms of thought.

Nothing could be further from the truth. A man who thinks that economics is only a matter for professors forgets that this is the science that has sent men to the barricades. A man who has looked into an economics textbook and concluded that economics is boring is like a man who has read a primer on logistics and decided that the study of warfare must be dull.

No, the great economists pursued an inquiry as exciting — and as dangerous — as any the world has ever known. The ideas they dealt with, unlike the ideas of the great philosophers, did not make little difference to our daily working lives; the experiments they urged could not, like the scientists', be carried out in the isolation of a laboratory. The notions of the great economists were world-shaking, and their mistakes nothing short of calamitous.

"The ideas of economists and political philosophers," wrote Lord Keynes, himself a great economist, "both when they are right and when they are wrong, are more powerful than is commonly understood. Indeed the world is ruled by little else. Practical men, who believe themselves to be quite exempt from any intellectual influences, are usually the slaves of some defunct economist. Madmen in authority, who hear voices in the air, are distilling their frenzy from some academic scribbler of a few years back. I am sure that the power of vested interests is vastly exaggerated compared with the gradual encroachment of ideas."

To be sure, not all the economists were such titans. Thousands of them wrote texts; some of them monuments of dullness, and explored minutiae with all the zeal of medieval scholars. If economics today has little glamour, if its sense of great adventure is often lacking, it has no one to blame but its own practitioners. For the great economists were no mere intellectual fusspots. They took the whole world as their subject and portrayed that world in a dozen bold attitudes — angry, desperate, hopeful. The evolution of their heretical opinions into common sense, and their exposure of common sense as superstition, constitute nothing less than the gradual construction of the intellectual architecture of much of contemporary life.

An odder group of men — one less apparently destined to remake the world — could scarcely be imagined.

There were among them a philosopher and a madman, a cleric and a stockbroker, a revolutionary and a nobleman, an aesthete, a skeptic, and a tramp. They were of every nationality, of every walk of life, of every turn of temperament. Some were brilliant, some were bores; some ingratiating, some impossible. At least three made their own fortunes, but as many could never master the elementary economics of their personal finances. Two were eminent businessmen, one was never much more than a traveling salesman, another frittered away his fortune.

Their viewpoints toward the world were as varied as their fortunes — there was never such a quarrelsome group of thinkers. One was a lifelong advocate of women's rights; another insisted that women were demonstrably inferior to men. One held that "gentlemen" were only barbarians in disguise, whereas another maintained that nongentlemen were savages. One of them — who was very rich — urged the abolition of riches; another — quite poor — disapproved of charity. Several of them claimed that with all its shortcomings, this was the best of all possible worlds; several others devoted their lives to proving that it wasn't.

All of them wrote books, but a more varied library has never been seen. One or two wrote best-sellers that reached to the mud huts of Asia; others had to pay to have their obscure works published and never touched an audience beyond the most restricted circles. A few wrote in language that stirred the pulse of millions; others — no less important to the world — wrote in a prose that fogs the brain.

Thus it was neither their personalities, their careers, their biases, nor even their ideas that bound them together. Their common denominator was something else: a common curiosity. They were all fascinated by the world about them, by its complexity and its seeming disorder, by the cruelty that it so often masked in sanctimony and the success of which it was equally often unaware. They were all of them absorbed in the behavior of their fellow man, first as he created material wealth, and then as he trod on the toes of his neighbor to gain a share of it.

Hence they can be called worldly philosophers, for they sought to embrace in a scheme of philosophy the most worldly of all of man's activities — his drive for wealth. It is not, perhaps, the most elegant kind of philosophy, but there is no more intriguing or more important one. Who would think to look for Order and Design in a pauper family and a speculator breathlessly awaiting ruin, or seek Consistent Laws and Principles in a mob marching in a street and a greengrocer smiling at his customers? Yet it was the faith of the great economists that just such seemingly unrelated threads could be woven into a single tapestry, that at a sufficient distance the milling world could be seen as an orderly progression, and the tumult resolved into a chord.

A large order of faith, indeed! And yet, astonishingly enough, it turned out to be justified. Once the economists had unfolded their patterns before the eyes of their generations, the pauper and the speculator, the greengrocer and the mob were no longer incongruous actors inexplicably thrown together on a stage; but each was understood to play a role, happy or otherwise, that was essential for the advancement of the human drama itself. When the economists were done, what had been only a humdrum or a chaotic world, became an ordered society with a meaningful life history of its own.

It is this search for the order and meaning of social history that lies at the heart of economics. Hence it is the central theme of this book. We are embarked not on a lecture tour of principles, but on a journey through history-shaping ideas. We will meet not only pedagogues on our way, but many paupers, many speculators, both ruined and triumphant, many mobs, even here and there a grocer. We shall be going back to rediscover the roots of our own society in the welter of social patterns that the great economists discerned, and in so doing we shall come to know the great economists themselves — not merely because their personalities were often colorful, but because their ideas bore the stamp of their originators.

It would be convenient if we could begin straight off with the first of the great economists — Adam Smith himself. But Adam Smith lived at the time of the American Revolution, and we must account for the perplexing fact that six thousand years of recorded history had rolled by and no worldly philosopher had yet come to dominate the scene. An odd fact: Man had struggled with the economic problem since long before the time of the Pharaohs, and in these centuries he had produced philosophers by the score, scientists, political thinkers, historians, artists by the gross, statesmen by the hundred dozen. Why, then, were there no economists?

It will take us a chapter to find out. Until we have probed the nature of an earlier and far longer-lasting world than our own — a world in which an economist would have been not only unnecessary, but impossible — we cannot set the stage on which the great economists may take their places. Our main concern will be with the handful of men who lived in the last three centuries. First, however, we must understand the world that preceded their entrance and we must watch that earlier world give birth to the modern age — the age of the economists — amid all the upheaval and agony of a major revolution.

Copyright © 1953, 1961, 1967, 1972, 1980, 1992, 1999 by Robert L. Heilbroner

Copyright renewed © 1981, 1989, 1995 by Robert L. Heilbroner

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Table of Contents

Contents

I Introduction

II The Economic Revolution

III The Wonderful World of Adam Smith

IV The Gloomy Presentiments of Parson Malthus and David Ricardo

V The Dreams of the Utopian Socialists

VI The Inexorable System of Karl Marx

VII The Victorian World and the Underworld of Economics

VIII The Savage Society of Thorstein Veblen

IX The Heresies of John Maynard Keynes

X The Contradictions of Joseph Schumpeter

XI The End of the Worldly Philosophy?

A Guide to Further Reading

Notes

Index

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Introduction

Introduction This is a book about a handful of men with a curious claim to fame. By all the rules of schoolboy history books, they were nonentities: they commanded no armies, sent no men to their deaths, ruled no empires, took little part in history-making decisions. A few of them achieved renown, but none was ever a national hero; a few were roundly abused, but none was ever quite a national villain. Yet what they did was more decisive for history than many acts of statesmen who basked in brighter glory, often more profoundly disturbing than the shuttling of armies back and forth across frontiers, more powerful for good and bad than the edicts of kings and legislatures. It was this: they shaped and swayed men's minds.

And because he who enlists a man's mind wields a power even greater than the sword or the scepter, these men shaped and swayed the world. Few of them ever lifted a finger in action; they worked, in the main, as scholars -- quietly, inconspicuously, and without much regard for what the world had to say about them. But they left in their train shattered empires and exploded continents; they buttressed and undermined political regimes; they set class against class and even nation against nation -- not because they plotted mischief, but because of the extraordinary power of their ideas.

Who were these men? We know them as the Great Economists. But what is strange is how little we know about them. One would think that in a world torn by economic problems, a world that constantly worries about economic affairs and talks of economic issues, the great economists would be as familiar as the great philosophers or statesmen. Instead they are only shadowy figures of the past, and the matters they so passionately debated are regarded with a kind of distant awe. Economics, it is said, is undeniably important, but it is cold and difficult, and best left to those who are at home in abstruse realms of thought.

Nothing could be further from the truth. A man who thinks that economics is only a matter for professors forgets that this is the science that has sent men to the barricades. A man who has looked into an economics textbook and concluded that economics is boring is like a man who has read a primer on logistics and decided that the study of warfare must be dull.

No, the great economists pursued an inquiry as exciting -- and as dangerous -- as any the world has ever known. The ideas they dealt with, unlike the ideas of the great philosophers, did not make little difference to our daily working lives; the experiments they urged could not, like the scientists', be carried out in the isolation of a laboratory. The notions of the great economists were world-shaking, and their mistakes nothing short of calamitous.

"The ideas of economists and political philosophers," wrote Lord Keynes, himself a great economist, "both when they are right and when they are wrong, are more powerful than is commonly understood. Indeed the world is ruled by little else. Practical men, who believe themselves to be quite exempt from any intellectual influences, are usually the slaves of some defunct economist. Madmen in authority, who hear voices in the air, are distilling their frenzy from some academic scribbler of a few years back. I am sure that the power of vested interests is vastly exaggerated compared with the gradual encroachment of ideas."

To be sure, not all the economists were such titans. Thousands of them wrote texts; some of them monuments of dullness, and explored minutiae with all the zeal of medieval scholars. If economics today has little glamour, if its sense of great adventure is often lacking, it has no one to blame but its own practitioners. For the great economists were no mere intellectual fusspots. They took the whole world as their subject and portrayed that world in a dozen bold attitudes -- angry, desperate, hopeful. The evolution of their heretical opinions into common sense, and their exposure of common sense as superstition, constitute nothing less than the gradual construction of the intellectual architecture of much of contemporary life.


An odder group of men -- one less apparently destined to remake the world -- could scarcely be imagined.

There were among them a philosopher and a madman, a cleric and a stockbroker, a revolutionary and a nobleman, an aesthete, a skeptic, and a tramp. They were of every nationality, of every walk of life, of every turn of temperament. Some were brilliant, some were bores; some ingratiating, some impossible. At least three made their own fortunes, but as many could never master the elementary economics of their personal finances. Two were eminent businessmen, one was never much more than a traveling salesman, another frittered away his fortune.

Their viewpoints toward the world were as varied as their fortunes -- there was never such a quarrelsome group of thinkers. One was a lifelong advocate of women's rights; another insisted that women were demonstrably inferior to men. One held that "gentlemen" were only barbarians in disguise, whereas another maintained that nongentlemen were savages. One of them -- who was very rich -- urged the abolition of riches; another -- quite poor -- disapproved of charity. Several of them claimed that with all its shortcomings, this was the best of all possible worlds; several others devoted their lives to proving that it wasn't.

All of them wrote books, but a more varied library has never been seen. One or two wrote best-sellers that reached to the mud huts of Asia; others had to pay to have their obscure works published and never touched an audience beyond the most restricted circles. A few wrote in language that stirred the pulse of millions; others -- no less important to the world -- wrote in a prose that fogs the brain.

Thus it was neither their personalities, their careers, their biases, nor even their ideas that bound them together. Their common denominator was something else: a common curiosity. They were all fascinated by the world about them, by its complexity and its seeming disorder, by the cruelty that it so often masked in sanctimony and the success of which it was equally often unaware. They were all of them absorbed in the behavior of their fellow man, first as he created material wealth, and then as he trod on the toes of his neighbor to gain a share of it.

Hence they can be called worldly philosophers, for they sought to embrace in a scheme of philosophy the most worldly of all of man's activities -- his drive for wealth. It is not, perhaps, the most elegant kind of philosophy, but there is no more intriguing or more important one. Who would think to look for Order and Design in a pauper family and a speculator breathlessly awaiting ruin, or seek Consistent Laws and Principles in a mob marching in a street and a greengrocer smiling at his customers? Yet it was the faith of the great economists that just such seemingly unrelated threads could be woven into a single tapestry, that at a sufficient distance the milling world could be seen as an orderly progression, and the tumult resolved into a chord.

A large order of faith, indeed! And yet, astonishingly enough, it turned out to be justified. Once the economists had unfolded their patterns before the eyes of their generations, the pauper and the speculator, the greengrocer and the mob were no longer incongruous actors inexplicably thrown together on a stage; but each was understood to play a role, happy or otherwise, that was essential for the advancement of the human drama itself. When the economists were done, what had been only a humdrum or a chaotic world, became an ordered society with a meaningful life history of its own.

It is this search for the order and meaning of social history that lies at the heart of economics. Hence it is the central theme of this book. We are embarked not on a lecture tour of principles, but on a journey through history-shaping ideas. We will meet not only pedagogues on our way, but many paupers, many speculators, both ruined and triumphant, many mobs, even here and there a grocer. We shall be going back to rediscover the roots of our own society in the welter of social patterns that the great economists discerned, and in so doing we shall come to know the great economists themselves -- not merely because their personalities were often colorful, but because their ideas bore the stamp of their originators.

It would be convenient if we could begin straight off with the first of the great economists -- Adam Smith himself. But Adam Smith lived at the time of the American Revolution, and we must account for the perplexing fact that six thousand years of recorded history had rolled by and no worldly philosopher had yet come to dominate the scene. An odd fact: Man had struggled with the economic problem since long before the time of the Pharaohs, and in these centuries he had produced philosophers by the score, scientists, political thinkers, historians, artists by the gross, statesmen by the hundred dozen. Why, then, were there no economists?

It will take us a chapter to find out. Until we have probed the nature of an earlier and far longer-lasting world than our own -- a world in which an economist would have been not only unnecessary, but impossible -- we cannot set the stage on which the great economists may take their places. Our main concern will be with the handful of men who lived in the last three centuries. First, however, we must understand the world that preceded their entrance and we must watch that earlier world give birth to the modern age -- the age of the economists -- amid all the upheaval and agony of a major revolution.

Copyright © 1953, 1961, 1967, 1972, 1980, 1992, 1999 by Robert L. Heilbroner
Copyright renewed © 1981, 1989, 1995 by Robert L. Heilbroner

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 34 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(16)

4 Star

(11)

3 Star

(4)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 34 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 31, 2005

    The Best Introductory Economic Book Ever

    I really liked this book. This book is mentioned in two other excellent books (Freakonomics and A Beautiful Mind). I am not going to major in economics, and I am too young to enter the classes at my school. I plan to read this book again once I begin those classes. I know I will be ahead of the class thanks, in part, to this book. I did notice that there is a slight pull towards certain economic systems (socialism). The book could use some more editing (by outside sources). I felt certain topics could have been discussed together instead of spread out. Sadly, I don¿t think there will be another edition. (Heilbroner died earlier this year.)

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 1, 2012

    Great find, not typical at all.

    I loved this book. It was gritty and tough, not you typical sugar coated romance. I couldn't put it down.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 25, 2012

    This is definitely one of my favourites... Teresa outdid herself

    This is definitely one of my favourites... Teresa outdid herself with the telling of this beautiful story. I immediately identified with the characters and found myself drifting away into the book and the beautiful love story that she told. Knowing that a sequel is on it's way... sends shivers up my spine.... just when you thought the story was over... Teresa has more to say.... 2 thumbs up for this book... Thanks Teresa :-)

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 14, 2012

    Great Read This story was very raw and makes the reader take a

    Great Read

    This story was very raw and makes the reader take a hard look in to the life of a woman, who is not a drug addict herself but, whose life is ruled by it. Her boyfriend Jax and her mother delve in to the world of drugs to escape the harsh world of reality leaving Cass to deal with responsibility alone.

    "You promised me you wouldn't do that anymore. You promised." Tears formed in my eyes, but I struggled to keep them from falling. He ignored me and tightened the belt around his arm.

    Cass feels she will never be anything more then what she people perceive her as, worthless White Trash. She doesn't indulge herself with fantasy of a knight and shining armor coming in on his white steed to sweep her off her feet. The knight she thought would save her life is sitting in their trailer with a needle hanging out of his arm.

    My eyes, normally a sky blue, looked dull and faded. I felt as though my life was literally draining out of them. I was becoming my mother. All I needed was a drug habit and forty extra pounds. Blonde hair, blue eyed nothing.

    One day during her shift at the diner she works at, she meets Tucker White. His outside appearance gives off the bad boy vibe and makes Cass cringe at the thought of being attracted to him. She learned early on bad boys were nothing but trouble. For unforeseen reason she finds herself completely attracted to Tucker but because of her barriers shes mean and heartless towards him. However, Tucker doesn't give up on his advances and a relationship begins to develop between the two.

    I really liked this story. I do wish it had been a little longer because it was over way too soon for me.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 9, 2012

    Wow... This story wrenched my heart, even in the happy times bet

    Wow... This story wrenched my heart, even in the happy times between Cass and Tucker it was painful. It definitely kept me reading. I had to know that Cass was going to get her happy ending, that she was going to learn to love and let someone love her. I can't wait till the second book, I know that there will be a lot more recovery for Cass...This is a fave for sure.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2012

    Fasciating introduction to economic history. This book will mak

    Fasciating introduction to economic history. This book will make you want to learn more.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 10, 2003

    Best Book I've Read in School

    Although that might be an overstatement, this book was a wonderful guide to understanding the beliefs of the great economists of lore. Amid thousands of pages of reading this semester, this stood out as the one thing I would read for pleasure. Understanding the human side of the thinkers was invaluable.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 11, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    This review is of the (currently) unpublished expanded edition.

    This review is of the (currently) unpublished expanded edition.

    I’ve found that the more I enjoy a book, the harder it is for me to review. I might have mentioned this once (or twice) before. White Trash Beautiful is no exception. I really liked this book.

    Mummert’s characters really come to life. Out of all of the characters I’ve read about recently, Cass has to be at the top of my favorites list. I liked that even though her life wasn’t all rainbows and butterflies, she wasn’t willing to lie down and accept it. She was working and fighting for a better life for her and her mother. While I didn’t like Jax, his character was done wonderfully. Another character that I enjoyed, though I didn’t at first, was Larry. One character that I didn’t connect with very much, though, was Tucker. Even though he’s a main character, I didn’t feel much of anything for him. While I absolutely loved that he wanted to protect and care for Cass, I didn’t see how he fell in love with her. There wasn’t ever a defining moment. It felt weird for me.

    The story was pretty good. The pacing was nice up until the last few chapters. The ending felt very rushed. Since it’s the first book in the trilogy, I don’t understand why the ending was so rushed. I believe it would have made more sense to keep up the initial smooth pacing and either make the book longer or just continue the story on in the second book. Other than the rushed ending, I liked the story and I cannot wait for the second book in the trilogy.

    * This book was received from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. *

    Be sure to check out my blog, KDH Reviews, to see all of my reviews.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 20, 2013

    Must Read

    I could barely put the book down. I wanted to know what was going to happen next.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 21, 2013

    $%#&

    Great story! Can not wait for the next one!
    :-)

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 14, 2013

    omg this is def on my recd to friends list. i was immediately in

    omg this is def on my recd to friends list. i was immediately invested in the characters and felt everything Cass did. i love when authors get to show versatility through their different books. i read the honor series first and fell in love. glad that i fell in love with cass and tucker also & even though their sex wasn't as "nasty" as in honor....it was still hot!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 6, 2013

    Cass¿s life is a terrible tragedy. A young girl with a rotten li

    Cass’s life is a terrible tragedy. A young girl with a rotten life, and no where to turn is the basis of this entire story. With an addicted Mother, and an abusive addict for a boyfriend she has found herself in a white trash lifestyle. Although, this character is far from white trash. With a realistic look on life she knows that the only way to change her present is to work hard for a better life. It is easy to see over the progression of this story that this young woman just can not find a break. That is until a mysterious Tucker walks into the diner. This relationship is long and steady, but I have to admit that I was a little disappointed in the character building. The story is narrated in first person, so while it is easy to relate and understand Cass, it was a struggle to maintain a firm grasp on the other characters. With this obstacle I feel that it also hindered the relationship development, and left their intensity so what lacking. The story line was one of extreme potential. When touching on such dark aspects of life I was intrigued from the start, but I wished everything else would have meshed with the desperation of the situation. After peaking my interest I will definitely have to read anymore additions to this series, but I hope to see the potential reached more effectively in the novels to come. Beware Mummert’s story is not your happy go’ lucky romance. Be prepared to touch the dark and dangerous aspects of Cass’s life.~BookWhisperer Reviewer JO~

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  • Posted January 23, 2013

    Good read, strong main character. I read in one sitting and real

    Good read, strong main character. I read in one sitting and really enjoyed the book.

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  • Posted December 27, 2012

    Loved it!

    Loved it!

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  • Posted November 8, 2012

    I really enjoyed this book. Cass pulled at my heartstrings so ma

    I really enjoyed this book. Cass pulled at my heartstrings so mant times. I felt so bad for her and how the course of her life had turned out. I wanted to kill Jackson for treating her so bad. Tucker was a great guy despite the temptations he lived around everyday. I just wish that the book was longer so we could see Cass and Tucker's love progress more in depth. Can't wait till the next one!!

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  • Posted November 7, 2012

    Outstanding book. Can't wait to read others from this author.

    Outstanding book. Can't wait to read others from this author.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 5, 2012

    Am AMAZING!!!

    I loved everybit of it. Couldnt put it down.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 14, 2011

    Fantastic book!

    I love the history details in this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 14, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 24, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

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