The Worst Journey in the World

The Worst Journey in the World

3.8 25
by Apsley Cherry-Garrard
     
 

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A firsthand account of Scott's disastrous Antarctic expedition

The Worst Journey in the World recounts Robert Falcon Scott’s ill-fated expedition to the South Pole. Apsley Cherry-Garrard—the youngest member of Scott’s team and one of three men to make and survive the notorious Winter Journey—draws on his firsthand

Overview

A firsthand account of Scott's disastrous Antarctic expedition

The Worst Journey in the World recounts Robert Falcon Scott’s ill-fated expedition to the South Pole. Apsley Cherry-Garrard—the youngest member of Scott’s team and one of three men to make and survive the notorious Winter Journey—draws on his firsthand experiences as well as the diaries of his compatriots to create a stirring and detailed account of Scott’s legendary expedition. Cherry himself would be among the search party that discovered the corpses of Scott and his men, who had long since perished from starvation and brutal cold. It is through Cherry’s insightful narrative and keen descriptions that Scott and the other members of the expedition are fully memorialized.

For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"The Worst Journey in the World is to travel writing what War and Peace is to the novel... a masterpiece." —The New York Review of Books

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781440626968
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
02/28/2006
Series:
Penguin Classics Series
Sold by:
Penguin Group
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
640
Sales rank:
238,639
File size:
1 MB
Age Range:
18 Years

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
"The Worst Journey in the World is to travel writing what War and Peace is to the novel... a masterpiece." —The New York Review of Books

Meet the Author

Apsley Cherry-Garrard (1886-1959) was one of the youngest members of Captain Scott's final expedition to the Antarctic which he joined to collect the eggs of the Emperor penguin. After the expedition, Cherry-Garrard served in the First World War and was invalided home. With the zealous encouragement of his neighbour, George Bernard Shaw, Cherry-Garrard wrote The Worst Journey in the World (1922) in an attempt to overcome the horror of the journey. As the years unravelled he faced a terrible struggle against depression, breakdown and despair, haunted by the possibility that he could have saved Scott and his companions.

Caroline Alexander has written for The New Yorker, Granta, Condé Nast Traveler, Smithsonian, Outside, and National Geographic and is the author of four previous books.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

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The Worst Journey in the World (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading) 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 25 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
As one who has done field research in Antarctica, I can vouch for this classic in the field. Cheery-Gerard was the youngest member of the Scott's 2nd expedition. His narrative of his mid-winter travels to retrieve penguin eggs is awe inspiring. For those who would like a scientific inquiry into how weather was the critical element in the demise of Scott and his polar party, read Susan Solomon's 'The Coldest March.' Simply excellent.
Guest More than 1 year ago
OK. I haven't read it yet, I only just brought it home. To counter one of the very negative reviews I see here, however, allow me to tell you why I bought it. Because I just finished Paul Theroux's "Fresh Air Fiend" (I love Theroux's travel books), in which he described this as the adventure book which he reccomends to those who ask him, "What's the best adventure/travel book you have ever read."
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great account of the Tera Nova Expedition! Sometimes the book is a tedious read since its a bit heavy on the details. Otherwise the men described are of an immensely admirable kind of inspiration. The things they were willing to do for science is incredible. There are some sagely words of wisdom here for anyone on their own journey.
Mktg More than 1 year ago
This book typically appears at the top of any list of the best adventure books of all time, an assertion easily verified on the Internet. The most compelling story of endurance I have ever read. Detailed? Of course it's detailed! It's written by one of the surviving members of the expedition.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a great story of the adventure to the Pole, but is most definitely over detailed for the average reader.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
I'm halfway through and getting so into the adventure that I've decided to hold off finishing until the snow arrives. It's hard to imagine the cold temperatures of the South Pole and I want to feel part of the book every time I go outside this winter!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I'm ordering this book because I've just read 'Race To The Pole' by Sir Ranulf Fiennes and it piqued my curiosity about another opinion of the Scott journey. In that book, Fiennes says Huntford's book about Scott basically trashed Scott's memory & was not based on evidence as much as Huntford's bias about Scott. Please read Fiennes book too to get a more rounded opinion. Cherry-Garrard wrote his book long after his journey & so might not be as clear as it should.