Wot a Way to Run a War!: The World War II Exploits and Escapades of a Pilot in the 352nd Fighter Group [NOOK Book]

Overview

Ted Fahrenwald flew P-47s and P-51s with the famed 352nd Fighter Group out of Bodney, England, during the critical tipping-point period of the air war over Europe. A classic devil-may-care fighter pilot, he was also a distinctively talented writer and correspondent. After a typical day of aerial combat and strafing missions over Nazi-occupied Europe - and of course, the requisite partying and creative mischief on base -Ted would sit in his Nissen hut at a borrowed manual typewriter and compose exquisitely ...
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Wot a Way to Run a War!: The World War II Exploits and Escapades of a Pilot in the 352nd Fighter Group

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Overview

Ted Fahrenwald flew P-47s and P-51s with the famed 352nd Fighter Group out of Bodney, England, during the critical tipping-point period of the air war over Europe. A classic devil-may-care fighter pilot, he was also a distinctively talented writer and correspondent. After a typical day of aerial combat and strafing missions over Nazi-occupied Europe - and of course, the requisite partying and creative mischief on base -Ted would sit in his Nissen hut at a borrowed manual typewriter and compose exquisitely humorous letters detailing his exploits in the air and on the ground to his family back home.
But these letters are not the mundane missives of a homesick young man who missed his mother's cooking. Rather, this journalistically educated and incurably comedic pilot detailed his aerial exploits in a hilarious and self-effacing style that combines the vernacular of the day with flights of joyful imagination rivaling St. Exupery. And he didn't sanitize his letters - much. Ted enthusiastically narrates the day-to-day rollercoaster ribaldry that was the natural M.O. of the young men who were tasked to kill Hitler's Luftwaffe. His descriptions of near-constant drinking, skirt-chasing, gambling, and out-and-out tomfoolery put the lie to the notion of the Greatest Generation as an earnest band of do-gooders.
These collected letters are not just literary entertainment: They are a boon not only to military and aviation historians, but also to those who study language, culture, and the science of societies at war.
The letters end dramatically when the ammunition truck that Ted was strafing exploded and knocked his Mustang "The Joker" out of the sky on June 8, 1944, just two days after D-Day. The subsequent story of his adventures with the Maquis (backwoods French Resistance) and his capture by the Germans and escape is recounted in a full-length companion book, Bailout Over Normandy: A Flyboy's Adventures with the French Resistance and Other Escapades in Occupied France. Written at age 24 and published from the recently discovered manuscript, Ted's book is a natural accompaniment to this collection of letters.
The Maquis embraced this irreverent and whimsical American fighter pilot as one of their own, and you will too when you read Ted's chronicle in letters and adventure book. His stories leap off the page and provide a depth, richness, and sheer enjoyment that are rare in WWII literature.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781612001920
  • Publisher: Casemate Publishers
  • Publication date: 1/15/2013
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 477,739
  • File size: 4 MB

Meet the Author

Ted Fahrenwald was born in on 12/26/1919 and grew up in south Chicago. He dropped out of his second year of college (Carlton College) to enlist at age 22, and went into combat with the 352nd Fighter Group in England in the summer of 1943. After his discharge in 1946, at age 24, he wrote this book about his experiences after bailing out over Normandy on D-Day+2. He spent about one year writing the manuscript. Finding no publisher, he put it on a shelf where it stayed for the next 65 years. When their father died shortly after the war, he operated a small steel foundry with his brother and had two children. He died in 2005 at age 86. The book gives a humorous one-of-a-kind inside glimpse at several small Maquis groups in Occupied France.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 3 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 21, 2014

    Wot a Riot! :)

    Delightful sense of humor in an awful time. I am a member of the Old Bold Pilots (there are old pilots and bold pilots, but few old bold pilots...) and this book is making the rounds. These letters to home describe his misadventures in and out of the cockpit. Because he is trying not to frighten his family, he uses his humor to lighten the mood, especially in the near death experiences. Sometimes you have to read between the lines. I found myself "glued" to this book and have read it several times. These are real letters. He also wrote another book about when he was shot down over Europe, which is also exciting.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 21, 2014

    A great way to understand what a fighter pilot experienced in WW2!

    Even though World War 2 censors prohibited exact details of Mr. Fahrenwald's missions, his letters were spiced with antics to keep me wondering what the next day would bring. In some cases quite corny but quite the norm in the 1940's. His descriptions of the P-47 and P-51 fighters of how cramped the cockpit was, and how the P-51 was the hot rod of the skies made me imagine how I could sit in one. All in all, a nice piece of history.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 2, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews

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