Would I Trade My Parents?

Would I Trade My Parents?

by Laura Numeroff, James Bernardin
     
 

Full of fun, whimsical details and a relatable cast of characters, Would I Trade My Parents? will resonate with parents and kids alike, as readers remember why they would never trade their parents for the world!
 
What child hasn’t thought about trading his or her parents for the ones next door? Who wouldn’t be discouraged if their

See more details below

  • Checkmark Kids' Club Eligible  Shop Now

Overview

Full of fun, whimsical details and a relatable cast of characters, Would I Trade My Parents? will resonate with parents and kids alike, as readers remember why they would never trade their parents for the world!
 
What child hasn’t thought about trading his or her parents for the ones next door? Who wouldn’t be discouraged if their parents didn’t allow them to have pets or go camping or drink chocolate milk before dinner?
 
In the newest picture book by New York Times #1 bestselling author Laura Numeroff, a little boy ponders why his friends’ parents are so special and why sometimes he wishes he could trade . . . But then he remembers his very own parents and all the amazing things that only they know how to do—like the way they always read with him or leave notes in his lunch box or take him on family bike rides. In fact, his parents are the best of all!

F&P level: K

F&P genre: RF

Read More

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
What child hasn’t indulged in the delicious treachery of wishing for different parents? The young narrator in this reverie considers how good some of his friends have it, with parents who are more lenient (Katie’s “let her watch TV until eight o’clock”), more adventurous (avid campers and convertible owners) or more handy (a plumber, an architect, a hairstylist). The boy even entertains envy for a kid whose parents are divorced: mom is a pet shop owner and dad makes sure “they have a great time when they’re together.” But in the end, the narrator sticks with the thoughtful, attentive pair he was issued at birth, because “I KNOW they’re the best!” Grown-up readers may find that wrapup immensely reassuring, and everyone will enjoy Bernardin’s lively slice-of-life drawings, which have touches of Mad magazine–style exaggeration. Ages 4–8. (Oct.)
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2—A nameless bespectacled boy recites the virtues of his friends' parents. Jason's dad builds houses, and his mom makes blueberry pancakes. Katie's mom is a dentist who drives a convertible, and her dad is an eye doctor. Katie is allowed to watch TV until 8 p.m. Sydney's mom is a hairdresser; her dad is a plumber. They square dance in the basement. And so on. The narrator wishes that his parents would do all these things. Finally he describes his parents. Mom teaches French and the piano and plays duets with him. Dad is a writer who talks to his son about everything. Mom puts notes in his lunchbox, and Dad reads to him every night. On weekends, they all go for bike rides. So no, the boy would not want to trade them. "I KNOW they're the best!" The illustrations are large and clear, made with acrylics and a digital paint program. They simply illustrate the text; there's nothing extra to peruse. This is a straightforward retelling of a common childhood exercise in wishful thinking.—Ieva Bates, Ann Arbor District Library, MI
Kirkus Reviews
The grass is always greener in other kids' families...or is it? Jason wouldn't trade his parents; his dad builds houses and his mom loves staying home to take care of the family. Kate's mom is a dentist who drives a big convertible and her father's a happy eye doctor; she gets to stay up till 8:00 watching television. Thus does the (unnamed) narrator admiringly examine the families of several of his friends. His own parents? His mother is a French teacher who also plays the piano-sometimes they play duets-and his dad is a writer who works at home and takes him on nature walks. Would he trade them? Bernardin's detailed acrylics effectively evoke a spectrum of interesting family lives and include an African-American and an Asian-American family, and Numeroff's prose is clean and direct; the refrain, "He/she thinks they're the best," is a pleasing one. But her title/premise is an odd and potentially off-putting device to launch this overview of family diversity, which, in its focus on middle-class happy families, ends up not much of an exploration. (Picture book. 4-6)

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780810906372
Publisher:
Abrams, Harry N., Inc.
Publication date:
10/01/2009
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
905,358
Product dimensions:
8.70(w) x 10.70(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >