The Wound Dresser

The Wound Dresser

by Walt Whitman
     
 

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Whitman's sexuality is often discussed alongside his poetry. Though biographers continue to debate his sexuality, he is usually described as either homosexual or bisexual in his feelings and attractions. However, there is disagreement among biographers as to whether Whitman had actual sexual experiences with men

Overview

Whitman's sexuality is often discussed alongside his poetry. Though biographers continue to debate his sexuality, he is usually described as either homosexual or bisexual in his feelings and attractions. However, there is disagreement among biographers as to whether Whitman had actual sexual experiences with men

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781490475745
Publisher:
CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform
Publication date:
11/25/2013
Pages:
154
Product dimensions:
7.44(w) x 9.69(h) x 0.33(d)

Read an Excerpt


provost duty at Lancaster, but would not probably remain so very long — seem to be moving towards southeast Kentucky — had a good camp, and good times generally. Le Gendre is colonel — Gen. Ferrero has left the service — Col. Potter (now brig.-gen.) is in Cincinnati — Capt. Sims, etc., are all well. George describes Kentucky as a very fine country — says the people are about half and half, Secesh and Union. This is the longest letter I have yet received from George. Did he write you one about the same time ? Mother, I have not rec'd any word from home in over a week — the last letter I had from Mr. Lane was about twelve days ago, sending me $10 for the soldiers (five from Mr. Kirkwood and five from Mr. Conklin Brush). Mother dear, I should like to hear from Martha; I wish Jeff would write me about it. Has Andrew gone ? and how is your wrist and arm, mother ? We had some very hot weather here — I don't know what I should have done without the thin grey coat you sent — you don't know how good it does, and looks too ; I wore it three days, and carried a fan and an umbrella (quite a Japanee) — most everybody here carries an umbrella, on account of the sun. Yesterday and to-day however have been quite cool, east wind. Mother, the shirts were a real godsend, they do first rate; I like the fancy marseilles collar and wristbands. Mother, how are you getting along — I suppose just the same as ever. I suppose Jess and Ed are just the same as ever. Whenyou write, you tell me all about everything, and the Browns, and the neighborhood generally. Mother, is George's trunk home and of no use there ? I wish I had it here, as I must have atrunk—but do not wish you to send until I send you word. I suppose my letter never appeared in the Eagle; well, I shall send them no more, as I think like...

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