Writer's Diary, 1877-1881

Overview

The Diary is Dostoevsky's attempt to create a new genre maximally open to present experience and unforeseen historical change--to capitalize on the excitement of an author's creative process, which would itself become material for art, and to demonstrate how an artist reflects on experience as it happens.
Read More Show Less
... See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (3) from $119.49   
  • New (1) from $205.16   
  • Used (2) from $119.49   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$205.16
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(196)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New

Ships from: Chicago, IL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

The Diary is Dostoevsky's attempt to create a new genre maximally open to present experience and unforeseen historical change--to capitalize on the excitement of an author's creative process, which would itself become material for art, and to demonstrate how an artist reflects on experience as it happens.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
This concluding volume of Dostoevsky's experimental one-man journal (he was its editor, publisher and sole contributor until his death in 1881) is a melange of political commentary, observations on current events, reportage of sensational murders, philosophical musings and literary criticism on Tolstoy, Turgenev and Pushkin. Dostoevsky's idealized vision of the Russian people as a nascent fellowship of Christ who reject the values of the godless, materialistic West is a recurrent theme. Offering a ringside seat to the growth of German nationalism under Bismarck, the Russo-Turkish War, political instability in France's Third Republic and the cauldron of Eastern European nationalisms, these voluble outpourings are also of interest for their sketches of ideas developed more fully in The Brothers Karamazov. Dostoevsky's vicious, poisonous tirades against Jews reveal the depth of his anti-Semitic prejudice. Also included is the story ``The Dream of a Ridiculous Man,'' which reflects his search for life's meaning and longing for redemption. Lantz is professor of Slavic languages and literatures at the University of Toronto. (June)
Library Journal
Volume 1 of this new translation, published last year, contains Gary Saul Morson's 117-page "Introductory Study," which means that Volume 2 is rather an orphan on its own. A Writer's Diary began in 1873 as a column in a periodical. From 1876 until his death in 1881, Dostoevsky-editor, publisher, and sole contributor-brought it out monthly as an independent publication. The Diary is a grab bag that includes autobiography, semifictional sketches, journalism, and a few short stories. It offers a valuable perspective on Russian cultural history and is also an important sourcebook for The Brothers Karamazov. The diversity of the Diary provides part of its fascination, though it recommends itself primarily to scholars of Russian literature. Dostoevsky's notion that he was creating a new literary genre is farfetched. The only previously available English translation is incomplete, lacks scholarly authority, and is long out of print. For specialists.-Keith Cushman, Univ. of North Carolina, Greensboro
Booknews
Go out and purchase volumes 1 (see the December 1993 R&R Book News) and 2 immediately. Dostoevsky's Diary--an amalgam of fiction, anecdotes, reminiscences, portraits of famous people, autobiography, polemic, sketches, reports on sensational crimes, historical predictions, and plans for stories--is a fascinating experiment in literary form and absolutely compelling reading, when presented in a translation as clear as that of Kenneth Lantz, who also provides the annotations. Volume 2 includes a comprehensive index to the Diary. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Joseph Frank
Illuminates and entire stretch of Russian cultural history, and is indispensable on this score alone.
London Review of Books
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780810111011
  • Publisher: Northwestern University Press
  • Publication date: 7/28/1994
  • Series: Series in Russian Literature and Theory , #2
  • Edition description: 1
  • Pages: 1455
  • Product dimensions: 5.88 (w) x 8.76 (h) x 1.81 (d)

Meet the Author

Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoyevsky (Russian: Фёдор Миха́йлович Достое́вский; IPA: [ˈfʲodər mʲɪˈxajləvʲɪtɕ dəstɐˈjefskʲɪj]  ; 11 November 1821 – 9 February 1881 ) sometimes spelled Dostoevsky, was a Russian writer of novels, short stories and essays. Dostoyevsky's literary works explore human psychology in the troubled political, social and spiritual context of 19th-century Russian society. Although Dostoyevsky began writing books in the mid-1850s, his best remembered work was done in his last years, including Crime and Punishment, The Idiot and The Brothers Karamazov. He wrote eleven novels, three novellas, seventeen short novels and three essays and is often acknowledged by critics as one of the greatest and most prominent psychologists in world literature. Fyodor Dostoyevsky was born and raised within the grounds of the Mariinsky hospital in Moscow, in Russia.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)