Writing Across the Chemistry Curriculum : An Instructor's Handbook / Edition 1

Paperback (Print)
Buy Used
Buy Used from BN.com
$22.41
(Save 37%)
Item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging.
Condition: Used – Good details
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $5.41
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 84%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (11) from $5.41   
  • New (5) from $19.99   
  • Used (6) from $5.41   

Overview

This book discusses issues surrounding a teacher implemented a writing-across-the-curriculum program—designed to improve students' rhetorical and writing skills—in physical science, particularly chemistry. It contains practical material such as suggested assignments and strategies that can be put into practice immediately to use writing effectively. A comprehensive reference tool, the advice offered in this book applies to courses throughout the entire chemistry curriculum, including graduate education. Other coverage discusses designing, grading, and responding to writing assignments. For instructors who are considering, or already offering such programs, this book is a rich resource of clear, step-by-step suggestions.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"New instructors could benefit from the wealth of experience that is shared and older instructors could benefit by a different view of some of the things that they may have tried in the past...." — David R. Burgess, Rivier College

"This text would definitely be useful for all faculty interested in incorporating writing in their courses." — Virginia M. Montecino, New Century College

"(The text) is clear, concise, to the point and full of good ideas." — John N. cooper, Bucknell University

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780130292841
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall
  • Publication date: 1/24/2001
  • Series: Educational Innovation Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 91
  • Sales rank: 1,093,662
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Meet the Author

Educated at Reed College and Yale University, Jeffrey Kovac, is a Professor of Chemistry at the University of Tenessee where he has taught both undergraduate and graduate courses in chemistry since 1976. Since 1995 he has also been Director of the Tennessee Governor's School for the Sciences, a four-week summer residential program for high school students. His interdisciplinary scholarly interests include statistical mechanics and thermodynamics, history and philosophy of science, especially scientific ethics, and chemical education. As a scientist and a writer, he has long believed that writing is both and effective learning tool and an essential professional skill and has used it in his courses whenever possible.

Donna W. Sherwood is Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of English at Knoxville College and teaches women's studies at the University of Tennessee. Donna also directs the writing program in the annual Tennessee Governor's School for the Sciences and assists civil environmental engineering students in producing professional papers. "Writing Across the Chemistry Curriculum" is the final product of her work with Professor Kovac to develop materials and present workshops for undergraduate chemistry teaches who want to teach writing in their courses.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Preface

This book derives from three insights. First, and most important, is the fundamental principle of the writing across the curriculum movement: writing is thinking. Perhaps the best way to develop a new idea is to write about it, to put one sentence after another, then revise and revise until what was once poorly understood is finally clear. Second is the realization that conceptual understanding in chemistry and other technical subjects is neither well developed nor assessed through the usual numerical problems that comprise the homework assignments and examinations in undergraduate courses. Often these problems can be solved algorithmically without yielding much conceptual insight. Writing, on the other hand, facilitates conceptual learning. Finally, we recognize that chemistry instructors need both a theoretical framework and practical advice on how to use writing effectively in their courses. Even though all working scientists are writers, few have had any experience or training in the teaching of writing.

It is easy to find excellent books on writing, including books on writing in chemistry; we have listed some of our favorites in the bibliography. While these books give excellent advice on all aspects of the writing process, they are usually silent on the teaching of writing. Books on how to teach writing are usually addressed to English composition instructors. This book is unique in that it is written for chemistry instructors who would like to help their students use writing as an effective learning tool. While we do provide a theoretical framework, the book is intended as a practical handbook addressing the "nuts and bolts" issues of assignment construction and grading. The ideas and sample assignments can be used immediately. We have applied our experience in teaching chemistry and writing to distill the best thinking from both the English composition and science education literature.

Many people have helped along the way. We are grateful to Dan Apple (Pacific Crest, Inc.), Janet Atwill (University of Tennessee, Knoxville), Terry Carlton (Oberlin College), Brian Coppola (University of Michigan), R. J. Hinde (University of Tennessee, Knoxville), Libby Jones (Berea College), Roger Jones (Berea, Kentucky), Michael L. Keene (University of Tennessee, Knoxville), Celeste Shibata (St. Andrews Episcopal School), and Jack Steehler (Roanoke College) for reading drafts of this handbook and making valuable suggestions for improvement. Valarie Breeding proofread the preliminary edition, and Peter Kovac designed the cover.

A number of colleagues around the country provided assignments. We appreciate their willingness to share ideas and experiences.

We are grateful to the University of Tennessee students in Chemistry 120 who generously allowed us to use samples of their writing.

In the summer of 1996, E. Cathleen Foster, an undergraduate research student supported by the UTK/ORNL Science Alliance, did important preliminary research for this project.

Financial support was provided by The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation; The University of Tennessee, Knoxville; The Hodges Better English Fund; and the Knoxville-Oak Ridge Chapter of the Society for Technical Communication.

We thank John Challice at Prentice Hall for believing in this project and Kristen Kaiser and Blake Cooper for making the book a reality.

Finally, friends and family sustain authors with support and encouragement. JK would like to thank Roger Jones for twenty-four years of conversations on science and science education that have influenced my thinking profoundly. Our families have sustained us with love, laughter, and, above all, patience.

JEFF KOVAC jkovac@utk.ed DONNA W. SHERWOOD sherwood@utk.edu

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

1. Introduction.

2. Designing Effective Writing Assignments.

Characteristics of a Good Assignment. Topic Types. Conceptual Levels. Formality and Informality in Writing Requirements. Constructing a Good Assignment. Summary.

3. Using Writing in the Chemistry Curriculum.

Using Writing in an Individual Chemistry Course. Using Writing Across the Curriculum. Summary.

4. Grading Writing Assignments.

Weighting Writing. Holistic Grading. Analytical Approach. Ungraded Writing. Training Graders. Summary.

5. Responding to Student Writing.

Writing Responses. Peer Evaluation. Conferencing. Summary.

6. Assignments.

Content-Specific Assignments. Re-Integration/Enrichment Assignments. Exam-Preparation Assignments. Form-Specific Assignments. Professional Advancement Assignments.

7. Annotated Bibliography.

Style Guides. Dictionaries and Usage Guides. Internet Resources. Professional and Technical Writing Guides. Other Resources for Writers. Resources for Teaching Writing.

Read More Show Less

Preface

Preface

This book derives from three insights. First, and most important, is the fundamental principle of the writing across the curriculum movement: writing is thinking. Perhaps the best way to develop a new idea is to write about it, to put one sentence after another, then revise and revise until what was once poorly understood is finally clear. Second is the realization that conceptual understanding in chemistry and other technical subjects is neither well developed nor assessed through the usual numerical problems that comprise the homework assignments and examinations in undergraduate courses. Often these problems can be solved algorithmically without yielding much conceptual insight. Writing, on the other hand, facilitates conceptual learning. Finally, we recognize that chemistry instructors need both a theoretical framework and practical advice on how to use writing effectively in their courses. Even though all working scientists are writers, few have had any experience or training in the teaching of writing.

It is easy to find excellent books on writing, including books on writing in chemistry; we have listed some of our favorites in the bibliography. While these books give excellent advice on all aspects of the writing process, they are usually silent on the teaching of writing. Books on how to teach writing are usually addressed to English composition instructors. This book is unique in that it is written for chemistry instructors who would like to help their students use writing as an effective learning tool. While we do provide a theoretical framework, the book is intended as a practical handbook addressing the "nuts and bolts" issues of assignment construction and grading. The ideas and sample assignments can be used immediately. We have applied our experience in teaching chemistry and writing to distill the best thinking from both the English composition and science education literature.

Many people have helped along the way. We are grateful to Dan Apple (Pacific Crest, Inc.), Janet Atwill (University of Tennessee, Knoxville), Terry Carlton (Oberlin College), Brian Coppola (University of Michigan), R. J. Hinde (University of Tennessee, Knoxville), Libby Jones (Berea College), Roger Jones (Berea, Kentucky), Michael L. Keene (University of Tennessee, Knoxville), Celeste Shibata (St. Andrews Episcopal School), and Jack Steehler (Roanoke College) for reading drafts of this handbook and making valuable suggestions for improvement. Valarie Breeding proofread the preliminary edition, and Peter Kovac designed the cover.

A number of colleagues around the country provided assignments. We appreciate their willingness to share ideas and experiences.

We are grateful to the University of Tennessee students in Chemistry 120 who generously allowed us to use samples of their writing.

In the summer of 1996, E. Cathleen Foster, an undergraduate research student supported by the UTK/ORNL Science Alliance, did important preliminary research for this project.

Financial support was provided by The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation; The University of Tennessee, Knoxville; The Hodges Better English Fund; and the Knoxville-Oak Ridge Chapter of the Society for Technical Communication.

We thank John Challice at Prentice Hall for believing in this project and Kristen Kaiser and Blake Cooper for making the book a reality.

Finally, friends and family sustain authors with support and encouragement. JK would like to thank Roger Jones for twenty-four years of conversations on science and science education that have influenced my thinking profoundly. Our families have sustained us with love, laughter, and, above all, patience.

JEFF KOVAC
jkovac@utk.ed
DONNA W. SHERWOOD
sherwood@utk.edu

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)