Writing Blackness: John Edgar Wideman's Art and Experimentation

Overview

"One of the most critically acclaimed yet least recognized contemporary writers, African American author John Edgar Wideman creates work often described as difficult, even unfathomable. In Writing Blackness, James Coleman examines Wideman's prolific body of work with the goal of making his often elusive imagery and dense style more accessible and thus broadening his readership." "More so than for most writers, Coleman shows, Wideman's life has affected his writing. Born in 1941, Wideman grew up in a Pittsburgh suburb where he attended an

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Writing Blackness: John Edgar Wideman's Art and Experimentation

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Overview

"One of the most critically acclaimed yet least recognized contemporary writers, African American author John Edgar Wideman creates work often described as difficult, even unfathomable. In Writing Blackness, James Coleman examines Wideman's prolific body of work with the goal of making his often elusive imagery and dense style more accessible and thus broadening his readership." "More so than for most writers, Coleman shows, Wideman's life has affected his writing. Born in 1941, Wideman grew up in a Pittsburgh suburb where he attended an integrated high school, starred on the basketball team, and was senior class president and valedictorian. At the University of Pennsylvania he studied creative writing and became an all-Ivy League basketball player. Winning a Rhodes scholarship, he studied at Oxford, after which he returned to Penn and became its first black tenured professor. Wideman pubished his first novel, A Glance Away, at age twenty-six and by 1973 had published two more works of fiction." "But for all this success, something began to wear on him. In 1973, his grandmother did, and after listening to family stories when he traveled home for the funeral, Wideman began to change his world view. Between 1973 and 1981 Wideman published nothing and immersed himself in African American culture, reading widely and---even more important---moving much closer to his family. Since 1981, Wideman has refocused his life and writing on blackness and published twelve experimental works, all very different from his earlier books." "Coleman examines nearly all of Wideman's work, from A Glance Away (1967) to Fanon (2008). He shows how Wideman has developed a unique style that combines elements of fiction, biography, memoir, history, legend, folklore, waking life, and dream in innovative ways in an effort to grasp the meaning of blackness---an effort that makes his writing challenging but that holds more than ample rewards for the perceptive reader." In Writing Blackness, Coleman demonstrates why Wideman ranks among the best of contemporary American writers.

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Coleman seeks to attract additional readers to one of our era's most acclaimed but elusive African American writers by examining his novels, short stories, memoir, and other nonfiction in the context of Wideman's life.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780807136447
  • Publisher: Louisiana State University Press
  • Publication date: 12/1/2010
  • Pages: 208
  • Product dimensions: 5.70 (w) x 8.60 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

James W. Coleman is a professor of English at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the author of Faithful Vision: Treatments of the Sacred, Spiritual, and Supernatural in Twentieth-Century African American Fiction.

LSU Press

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Table of Contents

Preface

1 Brothers and Keepers, Fatheralong, Hoop Roots, and The Island: Martinique

The Fictionalized Auto/Biographies 1

2 A Glance Away, Hurry Home, and The Lynchers

Modernist Experimentation and The Early Novels 42

3 Hiding Place, Damballah, and Sent for You Yesterday

New Dimensions of Postmodern Experimentation in The Homewood Trilogy 63

4 Reuben and Philadelphia Fire

Progressive Experimentation After The Homewood Trilogy 96

5 The Cattle Killing, Two Cities, and Fanon

Extending Experimental Writing, Making It Clear, And Extending It Further 119

Conclusion 164

Notes 169

Works Cited and Other Sources 181

Index 187

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