Writing Fiction: A Guide to Narrative Craft / Edition 8

Writing Fiction: A Guide to Narrative Craft / Edition 8

4.8 6
by Janet Burroway, Elizabeth Stuckey-French, Ned Stuckey-French
     
 

ISBN-10: 0205750346

ISBN-13: 9780205750344

Pub. Date: 01/18/2010

Publisher: Longman

The most widely used and respected text in its field, Writing Fiction, 7e by novelists Janet Burroway and Elizabeth Stuckey-French guides the novice story writer from first inspiration to final revision by providing practical writing techniques and concrete examples. Written in a tone that is personal and non-prescriptive, the text encourages students to…  See more details below

Overview

The most widely used and respected text in its field, Writing Fiction, 7e by novelists Janet Burroway and Elizabeth Stuckey-French guides the novice story writer from first inspiration to final revision by providing practical writing techniques and concrete examples. Written in a tone that is personal and non-prescriptive, the text encourages students to develop proficiency through each step of the writing process, offering an abundance of exercises designed to spur writing and creativity. The text also integrates diverse contemporary short stories in every chapter in the belief that the reading of inspiring fiction goes hand-in-hand with the writing of fresh and exciting stories.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780205750344
Publisher:
Longman
Publication date:
01/18/2010
Edition description:
Older Edition
Pages:
432
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 8.90(h) x 1.00(d)

Table of Contents

*** indicate sections new to this edition.

Preface

1. Whatever Works: The Writing Process

Get Started

Journal Keeping

Freewriting

Exercises

The Computer

The Critic: A Caution

Choosing a Subject

Keep Going

A Word about Theme

Reading as Writers***

About the Writing Workshop***

How Workshops Work***

The Writer’s Role***

Writing Exercises

2. Seeing is Believing: Showing and Telling

Significant Detail

Writing about Emotion

Filtering

Comparison

Types of Metaphor and Simile***

Metaphoric Faults to Avoid***

The Active Voice

Prose Rhythm

Mechanics

“We Didn’t,” Stuart Dybeck***

“Big Me,” Dan Chaon

“The Red Fox Fur Coat,” Teolinda Gersao (Translated by Margaret Jull Costa)***

Freewriting

Exercises

The Computer

The Critic: A Caution

Choosing a Subject

Keep Going

A Word about Theme

Reading as Writers***

About the Writing Workshop***

How Workshops Work***

The Writer’s Role***

Writing Exercises

2. Seeing is Believing: Showing and Telling

Significant Detail

Writing about Emotion

Filtering

Comparison

Types of Metaphor and Simile***

Metaphoric Faults to Avoid***

The Active Voice

Prose Rhythm

Mechanics

“We Didn’t,” Stuart Dybeck***

“Big Me,” Dan Chaon

“The Red Fox Fur Coat,” Teolinda Gersao (Translated by Margaret Jull Costa)***

Writing Exercises

3. Building Character: Dialogue

The Direct Methods of Character Presentation

Dialogue

Summary, Indirect, and Direct Dialogue

Economy in Dialogue

Characterizing Dialogue

Other Uses of Dialogue

Dialogue as Action

Text and Subtext

“No” Dialogue

Specificity

Format and Style

Vernacular

“Fiesta, 1980,” Junot Diaz***

“Every Tongue Shall Confess,” Z.Z. Packer***

“His Hand on my Restless Leg,” Pia Z. Ehrhardt***

Writing Exercises

4. The Flesh Made Word: Characterization, Part II

The Direct Methods of Character Presentation

Appearance

Action

Thought

The Indirect Methods of Character Presentation

Authorial Interpretation

Interpretation by Another Character

Conflict between Methods of Presentation

The Universal Paradox

Credibility

Purpose

Complexity

Change
Reinventing Character
Creating a Group or Crowd

The Character Journal
Character: A Summary

“Mule Killers,” Lydia Peelle***

Bullet in the Brain,” Tobias Wolff

Tandolfo the Great,” Richard Bausch

Writing Exercises

5. Far, Far Away: Fictional Place

Place and Atmosphere

Harmony and Conflict Between Character and Place

Place and Character
Place and Emotion

Symbolic and Suggestive Place
Alien and Familiar Place

An Exercise in Place

“The Sea Fairies,” Maura Stanton***

“Love and Hydrogen,” Jim Shepard

A Visit of Charity,” Eudora Welty

Writing Exercises

6. Long Ago: Fictional Time

Summary and Scene

Revising Summary and Scene

Flashback

Slow Motion

“Homonoids,” Jill McCorkle***

“Mrs. Dutta Writes a Letter,” Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni

“Feelers,” John Gould***

Writing Exercises

7. The Tower and the Net: Story Form, Plot, and Structure

Conflict, Crisis, and Resolution

The Arc of the Story

Patterns of Power

Connection and Disconnection

Story Form as a Check Mark

Story and Plot

The Short Story and the Novel

“What You Pawn, I Will Redeem,” Sherman Alexie***

“My Kid’s Dog,” Ron Hansen***

“Everything That Rises Must Converge,” Flannery O’Connor

Writing Exercises

8. Call Me Ishmael: Point of View

Who Speaks?

Third Person

Second Person

First Person

To Whom?

The Reader

Another Character

The Self

Interior Monologue

Stream of Consciousness

In What Form?

At What Distance?

Consistency: A Final Caution

“Missing Women,” June Spence***

“Who’s Irish?,” Gish Jen

“Reply All,” Robin Hemley***

Writing Exercises

9. Play It Again, Sam: Revision

Re-Vision

Worry It and Walk Away

Criticism and the Story Workshop

Asking the Big Question: “What Have I Written”

How Fictional Elements Contribute to Theme

Revision Questions

Further Suggestions for Revision

Examples of the Revision Process

“Notes on Keith” and early draft of “Keith,” Ron Carlson***

Final Draft of “Keith,” Ron Carlson

Writing Exercises

Appendix: Kinds of Fiction

Credits

Index

Read More

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Writing Fiction: A Guide to Narrative Craft 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have hundreds of books on writing, but Burroway's book is a core book for anyone who's serious about writing. It covers everything, is both practical in its instruction and inspirational when you see just how everything can come together to create a good story. I use this book over and over to remind myself of key features. I have a few favorites out of my big collection, and this is definitely one of them! It's expensive, but worth it. Get it, even used--the way I got it. You won't regret it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book covers it all--and well. Used in colleges around the country, it explains fictional techniques and how to write stories. I particularly like the exerpts and examples from noted authors used to illustrate each section.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book helped me to greatly improve my fiction writing. A wonderful help for making your stories sound like the greats!
THHernandez 5 months ago
This is a comprehensive book on craft that starts with the basics and works deeper with solid examples that drive the point home. With detailed chapters on the process of writing, showing vs. telling, and creating three-dimensional characters and settings, this may be the penultimate book for beginning writers. Even intermediate writers will find reminders about all the things we're doing wrong that we knew were wrong, but forgot we were doing. Filled with vivid examples to illustrate every lesson, the book even has a few things for more seasoned writers. New writers often have the hardest time grasping the concept of showing vs. telling, and this section in Writing Fiction is one of the best yet I've read, teaching the difference between the two with well-written examples perfectly re-written to ensure the lesson is learned. The section on characterization is exceptionally thorough, delving into great detail on what makes good characters and what makes great characters. All stories need good characters, but the best stories have great characters. With about one-third examples and writing exercises and two-thirds instruction, I firmly believe this is the first book every aspiring fiction writer should pick up and study. Bottom Line Writing Fiction is expensive, but worth every penny. This is the textbook every aspiring novelist needs to read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago