Writing for Life: Sentences and Paragraphs (with MyWritingLab Pearson eText Student Access Code Card)

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Overview

D.J. Henry wrote Writing for Life from the ground up for today’s college student. The ground-breaking approach of combining instruction and visual tools makes writing, reading and thinking processes visible, and shows the processes rather than just telling students about them. Highly graphic layouts and unique visual pedagogy empower students to transfer the learning strategies they already use in interpreting the visual world to the task of writing.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780205802661
  • Publisher: Longman
  • Publication date: 5/25/2010
  • Edition description: Older Edition
  • Product dimensions: 8.50 (w) x 10.80 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

D. J. Henry is a veteran teacher with over 25 years of community college classroom experience and an acclaimed textbook author. During the course of her teaching career, D.J. Henry has served on several federally funded grants designed to infuse teaching and learning with sound pedagogies and technological supports. D.J. Henry has extensive experience in the standardized testing of literacy competencies. She worked with the State of Florida from 1982 to 2002 as an item writer, rubric writer, and reader for the College Level Academic Skills Test (CLAST) and the State Developmental Reading and Writing Exit Exam. D.J. Henry also served as a reader for the Florida Teacher Certification Exam (FTCE) for over 15 years.

D.J. Henry has several esteemed publications, including a three-book college reading series with Longman Publishers (The Skilled Reader, The Effective Reader, and The Master Reader). Adopted at over 1,100 institutions nation wide, the series had an immediate and profound impact on the teaching of college reading, and is the most successful launch of a first edition reading series in over two decades. Another highly regarded publication is D.J. Henry’s Thinking Through the Test (Longman Publishers), a study guide for the State Developmental Reading and Writing Exit Exam in Florida. Additionally, she has also published innovations in authentic assessments that utilize student portfolio pedagogies.

A passionate educator and dedicate colleague, D.J. Henry continues to share her expertise in reading, writing, and authentic assessment through numerous presentations and workshops at national, regional, and local conferences and individual colleges.

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Table of Contents

PART 1. GETTING READY TO WRITE

1. Prepare to Learn about Writing

2. Thinking through the Writing Process

PART 2. WRITING PARAGRAPHS

3. Understanding the Paragraph

4. Using Thought Patterns to Develop Paragraphs

PART 3. HOW TO WRITE AN ESSAY

5. Understanding the Essay

6. Effective Introductions, Conclusions, and Titles

7. Writing with SUCCESS for an Essay Exam

PART 4. THE BASIC SENTENCE

8. Subjects, Verbs, and the Simple Sentence

9. Compound and Complex Sentences

PART 5. WRITING CLEAR SENTENCES

10. Sentence Variety

11. Sentence Clarity

12. Parallelism

PART 6. RECOGNIZING AND AVOIDING ERRORS

13. Run-ons: Comma Splices and Fused Sentences

14. Fragments

15. Dangling and Misplaced Modifiers

16. Subject-Verb Agreement

17. The Past Tense of Verbs

18. The Past Participle

19. Nouns and Pronouns

20. Adjectives and Adverbs

PART 7. PUNCTUATION AND MECHANICS

21. The Comma

22. The Apostrophe

23. Quotation Marks

24. End Punctuation: Period, Question Mark, Exclamation Point

25. Capitalization

PART 8. UNDERSTANDING EXPRESSION

26. Revising for Effective Expression

27. Improving Your Spelling

28. Mastering Often Confused Words

29. Dialects and Standard English

PART 9. READING SELECTIONS

Appendix

Index

Detailed Table of Contents

PART 1. GETTING READY TO WRITE

1. Prepare to Learn about Writing

What’s the Point of Preparing to Learn about Writing?

Making a Point about Preparing to Learn about Writing: One Student Writer’s Response

Preparing Yourself to Learn about Writing

The Attitude of Learning

Create a Study Plan

Learning Outcomes for Student Writers

Using Learning Outcomes to Improve Your Writing

Create a Portfolio of Your Work

Academic Learning Log

2. Thinking through the Writing Process

What’s the Point of the Writing Process?

Making a Point about the Writing Process: One Student Writer’s Response

Understanding the Point: Assessing the Writing Situation

The Topic: What You Write

The Purpose: Why You Write

The Audience: Who Reads Your Writing

Understanding the Point: Using the Writing Process

Prewriting

Drafting

Revising

Proofreading

Academic Learning Log

PART 2. WRITING PARAGRAPHS

3. Understanding the Paragraph

What’s the Point of a Paragraph?

Three Levels of Information in a Paragraph

The Parts of a Paragraph

Developing Your Point Using a Paragraph

The Point: The Main Idea

Logical Order

Relevant and Adequate Details

Effective Expression

Analyzing the Effectiveness of a Paragraph

Scoring Guide for a Paragraph

4. Using Thought Patterns to Develop Paragraphs

What’s the Point of Using Patterns of Organization to Develop Paragraphs?

The Descriptive Paragraph

What’s the Point of Description?

Making a Point Using Description: One Student Writer’s Response

Writing Assignments

Considering Audience and Purpose

Writing for Everyday Life

Writing for College Life

Writing for Working Life

Workshop: Description Graphic Organizer and Writer’s Journal

The Narrative Paragraph

What’s the Point of Narration?

Making a Point Using Narration: One Student Writer’s Response

Writing Assignments

Considering Audience and Purpose

Writing for Everyday Life

Writing for College Life

Writing for Working Life

Workshop: Narrative Graphic Organizer and Writer’s Journal

The Process Paragraph

What’s the Point of Process?

Making a Point Using Process: One Student Writer’s Response

Writing Assignments

Considering Audience and Purpose

Writing for Everyday Life

Writing for College Life

Writing for Working Life

Workshop: Process Graphic Organizer and Writer’s Journal

The Example Paragraph

What’s the Point of Example?

Making a Point Using Example: One Student Writer’s Response

Writing Assignments

Considering Audience and Purpose

Writing for Everyday Life

Writing for College Life

Writing for Working Life

Workshop: Example Graphic Organizer and Writer’s Journal

The Classification Paragraph

What’s the Point of Classification?

Making a Point Using Classification: One Student Writer’s Response

Writing Assignments

Considering Audience and Purpose

Writing for Everyday Life

Writing for College Life

Writing for Working Life

Workshop: Classification Graphic Organizer and Writer’s Journal

The Comparison and Contrast Paragraph

What’s the Point of Comparison and Contrast?

Making a Point Using Comparison and Contrast: One Student Writer’s Response

Writing Assignments

Considering Audience and Purpose

Writing for Everyday Life

Writing for College Life

Writing for Working Life

Workshop: Comparison and Contrast Graphic Organizer and Writer’s Journal

The Definition Paragraph

What’s the Point of Definition?

Making a Point Using Definition: One Student Writer’s Response

Writing Assignments

Considering Audience and Purpose

Writing for Everyday Life

Writing for College Life

Writing for Working Life

Workshop: Definition Graphic Organizer and Writer’s Journal

The Cause and Effect Paragraph

What’s the Point of Cause and Effect?

Making a Point Using Cause and Effect: One Student Writer’s Response

Writing Assignments

Considering Audience and Purpose

Writing for Everyday Life

Writing for College Life

Writing for Working Life

Workshop: Cause and Effect Graphic Organizer and Writer’s Journal

The Persuasive Paragraph

What’s the Point of Persuasion?

Making a Point Using Persuasion: One Student Writer’s Response

Writing Assignments

Considering Audience and Purpose

Writing for Everyday Life

Writing for College Life

Writing for Working Life

Workshop: Persuasion Graphic Organizer and Writer’s Journal

PART 3. HOW TO WRITE AN ESSAY

5. Understanding the Essay

What’s the Point of an Essay?

The Parts of an Essay

The Levels of Information in an Essay

Making a Point Using an Essay: One Student Writer’s Response

Developing Your Point: Writing an Essay Step by Step

Prewriting

Organize Supporting Details: Use Logical Order

Organize Supporting Details: Connect Paragraphs

Write a Draft of Your Essay

Revise Your Essay Draft

Proofreading Your Essay

Academic Learning Log

Writing Assignments for an Essay

Considering Audience and Purpose

Writing for Everyday Life

Writing for College Life

Writing for Working Life

6. Effective Introductions, Conclusions, and Titles

What’s the Point of Effective Titles, Introductions, and Conclusions?

Making a Point Using Effective Titles, Introductions, and Conclusions: One

Student Writer’s Response

Developing Your Point Using Effective Titles, Introductions, and Conclusions

Effective Titles

Effective Introductions

Effective Conclusions

Writing Assignments

Considering Audience and Purpose

Writing for Everyday Life

Writing for College Life

Writing for Working Life

Academic Learning Log

7. Writing with SUCCESS for an Essay Exam

What’s the Point of SUCCESS?

Using SUCCESS during an Essay Exam

Survey the exam

Understand grading point values

Control your time

Create an answer plan

Express a main idea

Support ideas thoroughly and clearly

Skim to edit

Writing Assignments

Writing for Everyday Life

Writing for College Life

Writing for Working Life

Academic Learning Log

PART 4. THE BASIC SENTENCE

8. Subjects, Verbs, and the Simple Sentence

What’s the Point of Subjects, Verbs, and Simple Sentences?

Understanding the Point of Subjects, Verbs, and Simple Sentences: One Student Writer’s Response

Applying the Point: Subjects, Verbs, and Simple Sentences

Subjects

Verbs

The Simple Sentence

Locating Subjects and Verbs to Identify

Complete Thoughts

Writing Assignments

Writing for Everyday Life

Writing for College Life

Writing for Working Life

Academic Learning Log

9. Compound and Complex Sentences

What’s the Point of Compound and Complex Sentences?

Understanding the Point of Compound and Complex Sentences: One Student Writer’s Response

Applying the Point: Compound and Complex Sentences

A Compound Sentence

A Complex Sentence

Writing Assignments

Writing for Everyday Life

Writing for College Life

Writing for Working Life

Academic Learning Log

PART 5. WRITING CLEAR SENTENCES

10. Sentence Variety

What’s the Point of Sentence Variety?

Understanding the Point of Sentence Variety: One Student Writer’s Response

Applying the Point: Sentence Variety

Vary Sentence Purpose

Vary Sentence Types

Vary Sentence Openings

Writing Assignments

Writing for Everyday Life

Writing for College Life

Writing for Working Life

Academic Learning Log

11. Sentence Clarity

What’s the Point of Sentence Clarity?

Understanding the Point of Sentence Clarity: One Student Writer’s Response

Applying the Point: Sentence Clarity

Use Consistent Person and Point of View

Use Consistent Number

Use Consistent Tense

Writing Assignments

Writing for Everyday Life

Writing for College Life

Writing for Working Life

Academic Learning Log

12. Parallelism

What’s the Point of Parallelism?

Understanding the Point of Parallelism: One Student Writer’s Response

Applying the Point: Parallelism

Parallel Words

Parallel Phrases

Parallel Phrases

Parallel Clauses

Punctuation for Parallelism

Writing Assignments

Writing for Everyday Life

Writing for College Life

Writing for Working Life

Academic Learning Log

PART 6. RECOGNIZING AND AVOIDING ERRORS

13. Run-ons: Comma Splices and Fused Sentences

What’s the Point of Correcting Run-ons—Comma Splices and Fused Sentences?

Understanding the Point of Correcting Run-ons—Comma Splices and Fused

Sentences: One Student Writer’s Response

Applying the Point: Correcting Run-ons—Comma Splices and Fused Sentences

Comma Splice

Fused Sentence

Five Ways to Correct Comma Splices and Fused Sentences

Writing Assignments

Writing for Everyday Life

Writing for College Life

Writing for Working Life

Academic Learning Log

14. Fragments

What’s the Point of Correcting Fragments?

Understanding the Point of Correcting Fragments: One Student Writer’s Response

Applying the Point: Correcting Fragments

Types of Fragments

Writing Assignments

Writing for Everyday Life

Writing for College Life

Writing for Working Life

Academic Learning Log

15. Dangling and Misplaced Modifiers

What’s the Point of Correcting Misplaced and Dangling Modifiers?

Understanding the Point of Correcting Misplaced and Dangling Modifiers: One Student Writer’s Response

Applying the Point: Correcting Misplaced and Dangling Modifiers

Misplaced Modifiers

Dangling Modifiers

Writing Assignments

Writing for Everyday Life

Writing for College Life

Writing for Working Life

Academic Learning Log

16. Subject-Verb Agreement

What’s the Point of Subject-Verb Agreement?

Understanding the Point of Subject-Verb Agreement: One Student Writer’s Response

Applying the Point: Subject-Verb Agreement

Key Verbs in the Present Tense: To Have, To Do, To Be

Subjects Separated from Verbs

Singular or Plural Subjects

Writing Assignments

Writing for Everyday Life

Writing for College Life

Writing for Working Life

Academic Learning Log

17. The Past Tense of Verbs

What’s the Point of the Past Tense of Verbs?

Understanding the Point of the Past Tense of Verbs: One Student Writer’s Response

Applying the Point: The Past Tense of Verbs

Regular Verbs in the Past Tense

Irregular Verbs in the Past Tense

Key Verbs in the Past Tense: To Have, To Do, To Be

Can/Could/Would

Writing Assignments

Writing for Everyday Life

Writing for College Life

Writing for Working Life

Academic Learning Log

18. The Past Participle

What’s the Point of the Past Participle?

Understanding the Point of the Past Participle: One Student Writer’s Response

Applying the Point: The Past Participle

Past Participles of Regular Verbs

Past Participles of Irregular Verbs

Using the Present Perfect Tense

Using the Past Perfect Tense

Using the Passive Voice

(To Be and the Past Participle)

Using the Past Participle as an Adjective

Writing Assignments

Writing for Everyday Life

Writing for College Life

Writing for Working Life

Academic Learning Log

19. Nouns and Pronouns

What’s the Point of Learning About Nouns and Pronouns?

Understanding the Point of Learning About Nouns and Pronouns: One Student Writer’s Response

Applying the Point: Nouns

Count and Noncount Nouns

Articles and Nouns

Applying the Point: Pronouns

How to Make Pronouns and Antecedents Agree

How to Correct Faulty Pronoun Agreement

How to Use Pronoun Case Clearly

How to Make Clear Pronoun References

How to Correct Faulty Pronoun References

Writing Assignments

Writing for Everyday Life

Writing for College Life

Writing for Working Life

Academic Learning Log

20. Adjectives and Adverbs

What’s the Point of Learning About Adjectives and Adverbs?

Understanding the Point of Learning

About Adjectives and Adverbs: One Student Writer’s Response

Applying the Point: Adjectives and Adverbs

Participles as Adjectives

Nouns and Verbs Formed as Adjectives

Placement of Adjectives

Order of Adjectives

Adverbs

Writing Assignments

Writing for Everyday Life

Writing for College Life

Writing for Working Life

Academic Learning Log

PART 7. PUNCTUATION AND MECHANICS

21. The Comma

What’s the Point of Commas?

Understanding the Point of Commas: One Student Writer’s Response

Applying the Point: Commas

Commas with Items in a Series

Commas with Introductory Elements

Commas to Join Independent Clauses

Correct Use of a Comma to Join Independent Clauses

Commas with Parenthetical Ideas

Commas with Nonessential Clauses

Commas with Dates and Addresses

Other Uses of the Comma

Writing Assignments

Writing for Everyday Life

Writing for College Life

Writing for Working Life

Academic Learning Log

22. The Apostrophe

What’s the Point of the Apostrophe?

Understanding the Point of the Apostrophe: One Student Writer’s Response

Applying the Point: The Apostrophe

The Apostrophe for Ownership

The Apostrophe for Contractions

Common Misuses of the Apostrophe

Writing Assignments

Writing for Everyday Life

Writing for College Life

Writing for Working Life

Academic Learning Log

23. Quotation Marks

What’s the Point of Quotation Marks?

Understanding the Point of Quotation Marks: One Student Writer’s Response

Applying the Point: Quotation Marks

Formatting and Punctuating Direct Quotations

Formatting and Punctuating Dialogue

Direct and Indirect Quotations

Titles

Writing Assignments

Writing for Everyday Life

Writing for College Life

Writing for Working Life

Academic Learning Log

24. End Punctuation: Period, Question Mark, Exclamation Point

What’s the Point of End Punctuation?

Understanding the Point of End Punctuation: One Student Writer’s Response

Applying the Point: End Punctuation

The Period

The Question Mark

The Exclamation Point

Writing Assignments

Writing for Everyday Life

Writing for College Life

Writing for Working Life

Academic Learning Log

25. Capitalization

What’s the Point of Capitalization?

Understanding the Point of Capitalization: One Student Writer’s Response

Applying the Point: Capitalization

Writing Assignments

Writing for Everyday Life

Writing for College Life

Writing for Working Life

Academic Learning Log

PART 8. UNDERSTANDING EXPRESSION

26. Revising for Effective Expression

What’s the Point of Effective Expression?

Understanding the Point of Effective Expression: One Student Writer’s Response

Applying the Point: Effective Expression

Use Concise Language

Use Active and Positive Language

Use Concrete Language

Use Fresh Language

Writing Assignments

Writing for Everyday Life

Writing for College Life

Writing for Working Life

Academic Learning Log

27. Improving Your Spelling

What’s the Point of Improving Your Spelling?

Understanding the Point of Improving Your

Spelling: One Student Writer’s Response

Applying the Point: Improving Your Spelling

Five Steps to Improve Your Spelling

Rules for Improving Your Spelling

Writing Assignments

Writing for Everyday Life

Writing for College Life

Writing for Working Life

Academic Learning Log

28. Mastering Often Confused Words

What’s the Point of Mastering Often-Confused Words?

Understanding the Point of Mastering Often-Confused Words: One Student Writer’s Response

Applying the Point: Mastering

Often-Confused Words

Three Reasons for Word Confusion

Thirty Commonly Confused Words

Writing Assignments

Writing for Everyday Life

Writing for College Life

Writing for Working Life

Academic Learning Log

29. Dialects and Standard English

What’s the Point of Dialects and Standard English?

Understanding the Point of Dialects and Standard English: One Student

Writer’s Response Applying the Point: Dialects and Standard English

Understanding Articles and Nouns

Understanding Sequence of Verb Tenses

Understanding Prepositions

Understanding Idioms

Writing Assignments

Writing for Everyday Life

Writing for College Life

Writing for Working Life

Academic Learning Log

PART 9. READING SELECTIONS

What’s the Connection Between Reading and Writing?

Understanding the Connection Between Reading and Writing

Applying the Point: The Connection Between Reading and Writing

How to Annotate a Text

How to Write a Summary

A Reading Strategy for a Writer

Eighteen Reading Selections

DESCRIPTION

Water, Rachel Schneller

Rain of Fire, Evan Thomas

NARRATION

For My Indian Daughter, Lewis Sawaquat

Fish Cheeks, Amy Tan

PROCESS

“A Guide to Grief,” The Hospice Council of Metropolitan Washington

What to Cook? Planning Menus, Alice Waters

ILLUSTRATION

“Don’t Leave School Just Yet,” Rachel Ashwell

The Whistle, Benjamin Franklin

CLASSIFICATION

Birth Order—Does It Really Make Any Sense? Kevin Leman

Why I Want a Wife, Judy Brady

COMPARISON-CONTRAST

Two Views of the Mississippi, Mark Twain

My Favorite Guys, John Madden

DEFINITION

Who We Are: 9/6/05, Chris Rose

A Bad Apology Is Worse Than No Apology, Randy Pausch

CAUSE-EFFECT

Scientists Debate Tech Effect on Brain, Malcolm Ritter

Write for Your Life, Anna Quindlen

PERSUASION

Wimbledon Has Sent Me a Message: I’m Only a Second-Class Champion, Venus Williams

Are Women Earning More Than Men? Warren Farrell

Appendix

Learning Outcomes for a Student Writer

Academic Learning Log

Feedback logs

My Writing Process

Understanding the Reading Process SQ3R

Index

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