Writing for Publication: Road to Academic Advancement / Edition 1

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Overview

This concise, user-friendly book tells exactly what to do to dramatically improve any academic writer's chances for getting published. It includes proven principles, strategies, and tactics that can be applied to virtually any form of publishing -- from specialized or general magazines, to grant proposals, to nonfiction books of all types. One chapter highlights how to use journal and grant writing to get tenure-track positions and earn tenure. For any academic writer who would like to be more focused in his or her writing and more successful in getting published.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780205433193
  • Publisher: Pearson
  • Publication date: 10/22/2004
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 336
  • Sales rank: 752,070
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Table of Contents

Each chapter concludes with “Recapping the Major Points” and “References.”

1. Why Write?

Reasons to Write.

A Time and Place for Everything.

When Is the Best Time to Write?

Tooling Up for the Job.

The Best Place to Write.

Perennial Excuses.

Taking Inventory.

A Final Word.

2. Finding Topics.
The Dissertation: A Source of Topics.

Grants as a Source of Topics.

Your Job as a Source of Topics.

Other Occupations as Sources of Writing Topics.

Reference Books as a Source of Topics.

Forecasting the Future.

3. Getting Started.
The Right Title.

Writing the First Sentence.
Paragraphing.

Go Ahead and Write.

Profile: Arnold and Jeanne Cheyney.

4. About Style .

Writing Clearly.

5. Organizing Articles.

Organizing Nonfiction Articles.

Putting It Together.

6. Using Journals, Libraries, Surveys, and Action Research.

Using Journals.

Using Libraries.

Using Surveys.

Using Action Research.

7. Common Errors in Writing for Journals.
The Nature of Writing.

Mistakes and Recommendations.

8. Communicating with Journal Editors.

The Author-Editor Relationship.

Guest Editing.

9. Questions Writers Ask.

Why Do You Write?
What Suggestions Can You Give to Aspiring Writers?

Have You a Favorite Success Story?

How Do You Handle Rejection?

What Distinguishes Highly Successful Writers from Less Successful Writers?

Is It O.K. to Send a Manuscript to Multiple Publishers?

Are There Advantages in Collaborating?

Should I Collaborate Long Distance?

Should I Write Articles before Writing Short Stories or Books?

What Is a Refereed Journal?

Is It Wise to Use Vanity Publishers?

What about Self-Publishing?

If Asked, Should I Pay a Journal Publishing Expenses?

Should I Be a Specialist or a Generalist?

Questions about Copyright

How Can Authors Learn to Use the Library More Effectively?

Are Colloquialisms and Cliches Acceptable?

What Should I Do When an Editor Keeps Holding My Manuscript?

Whose Name Comes First?

Who Is Listed First If the Collaborators Are Professors and Graduate Students?

If I Furnish My Dissertation or Thesis for a Collaborator to Shape into a Manuscript, Is That an Equitable Exchange?

If I Share a Book Idea with a Publisher, How Can I Be Sure It Won't Be Turned Over to a More Experienced Author?

What Does It Mean When an Editor Asks the Author to Rewrite and Resubmit a Manuscript? Should I Do That?

Should I Use a Computer?

What Should I List on My Resume as Publications?

Do you Recommend Using Support Groups?

10. Getting Book Contracts.

Choosing the Right Book to Write.
Writing Professional Books.

Writing Books for University Presses.

Developing a Prospectus.

Selecting a Publisher.

Negotiating the Contract.

11. Planning for Success.
Managing Each Manuscript.

Profile: Bonnidell Clouse.

Develop a Tracking System.

Getting Mileage.

12. Grant Proposal Writing.
Make Your Proposal Timely.
Learn How to Develop Fresh Ideas.

Identify and Use Your Assets.

Gather the Necessary Materials.

Match Your Strengths with the Funders' Goals.

Foundation Proposals.

13. Parts of a Proposal.

Transmittal Letter.
Title Page.

Abstract.

Table of Contents.

Purposes, Goals, and Objectives.

Timetable.

Evaluation.

Budget.

Checklist.

14. Three Winning Proposals.
Prelude.
Proposal One: Project ESCAPE.
Using the Literature.
Proposal Two: The Summer Physics Institute.
Proposal Three: A Million-Vollar Technology Proposal.
Summary.

15. Using Technology to Write Grants.
Surfing the Internet.

Using the Internet to Validate.

Sources Available on the Internet.

Summary.

16 . Using Writing to Gain a Tenure-Track Position and Tenure.

The Rise of Non-Tenure Track Faculty.

What the Change in Status of Non Tenure-Track Faculty Means to You.

Align Your Grants and Articles with Your Department’s Goals.

Action Research.

Preparing for the Interview.

Final Note.

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