Writing for the Mass Media / Edition 7

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Overview

Writing for the Mass Media remains one of the clearest and most effective introductions to media writing on the market. This book offers clear writing, simple organization, abundant exercises, and precise examples that give readers information about media writing and opportunities to develop their skills as professional writers. With a focus on a converged style of media writing, and converting that style into real work, this eighth edition maintains its classic and effective text-workbook format while staying ahead of the curve and preparing professionals for their future careers.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“What impresses me most is how the author relates to the subject matter, the instructor, and the student all at once. Written in a non-stilted style, it is easily understood, practical, and it gets results.”

- Ronald P. Westpheling, George Mason University

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780205627844
  • Publisher: Pearson
  • Publication date: 12/26/2008
  • Edition description: Older Edition
  • Edition number: 7
  • Pages: 384
  • Lexile: 1120L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 8.40 (w) x 10.80 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author

James Glen Stovall is Edward J. Meeman Distinguished Professor of Journalism at the University of Tennessee. Before coming to Tennessee, he was a visiting professor of mass communication at Emory and Henry College in Emory, Virginia. From 1978 to 2003 he taught journalism at the University of Alabama. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Tennessee and is a former reporter and editor for several newspapers, including the Chicago Tribune. Stovall has more than five years of public relations experience. He is the author of a number of textbooks, including “Web Journalism: Practice and Promise of a New Medium” (2004), “Journalism: Who, What, When, Where, Why and How” (2005) and “Infographics: A Journalist’s Guide” (1997), all published by Allyn and Bacon. He is also the author of “Seeing Suffrage: The Washington Suffrage Parade of 1913, Its Pictures and Its Effect on the American Political Landscape,” (2013) published by the University of Tennessee Press. His website, www.jprof.com, contains a wide variety of material for teaching journalism. Stovall is also the author of the mystery novel, “Kill the Quarterback.”

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Table of Contents

Chapter 1. Sit Down and Write

What Is Good Writing?

Getting Ready to Write

Basic Techniques

Writing for the Mass Media

Professionalism

The Changing Media Environment

And Finally...

Points for Consideration and Discussion

Further Reading

Web Sites

Exercises

Chapter 2. Basic Tools of Writing

Words, Words, Words

Grammar

Sentences

Parts of Speech

Common Grammar Problems

Punctuation

Spelling

Writing with Clarity

Points for Consideration and Discussion

Further Reading

Web Sites

Exercises

Chapter 3. Style and the Stylebook

Accuracy

Clarity

Brevity

Journalistic Conventions

Journalistic Style

Stylebooks

The Associated Press Stylebook

Language Sensitivity

Conclusion

Points for Consideration and Discussion

Further Reading

Web Sites

Exercises

Chapter 4. Writing in the Media Environment

The News Culture

Accuracy

Verification and attribution

Simplicity

Clarity, coherence and context

Audience

Deadlines

Reporting

Observation

People

Records

Ethical Behavior

Hardware and software

Conclusion

Points for Consideration and Discussion

Further Reading

Web Sites

Exercises

Chapter 5. Reporting with Text

Headlines

The Inverted Pyramid

The Lead Paragraph

Using Quotations

Characteristics of News Stories

Summaries

Lists

Linking

Searching for Links

Nutshell structure

Points for Consideration and Discussion

Further Reading

Web Sites

Exercises

Chapter 6. Reporting with Images

Basic Concepts of Photojournalism

The Threes of Photojournalism

Writing Cutlines

A Word about Accuracy

Photojournalism Ethics

Reporting with Graphics

What a Good Graphic Contains

Building a Chart

Points for Consideration and Discussion

Further Reading

Web Sites

Exercises

Chapter 7. Writing for Print Journalism

Newspapers and Magazines Today

Long Form News Stories

Developing the Story

Transitions

Types of News Stories

Editing and Rewriting

Writing Feature Stories

Characteristics of Feature Writing

Parts of a Feature Story

Books

The Challenge of Writing

Points for Consideration and Discussion

Further Reading

Web Sites

Exercises

Chapter 8. Reporting with Audio and Video

Sound as a Reporting Tool

Writing To Be Heard

Recording Audio

Writing the Audio/Video News Story

Editing Audio

Ethics of Editing Audio

The Audio Slideshow

Telling The Story with Video

Shooting the Video

Editing Video

Conclusion

Points for Consideration and Discussion

Further Reading

Web Sites

Exercises

Chapter 9. Writing for Broadcast Journalism

Television News

Selection of News

Characteristics of Writing

Story Structure

Broadcast Copy Preparation

Putting Together a Newscast

The Extended Interview, the Documentary and the Web

Conclusion

Points for Consideration and Discussion

Further Reading

Web Sites

Exercises

Chapter 10. Writing for Web Journalism

Characteristics of the Web

Journalism Expanded and Accelerated

News Websites

Blogging (Web Logs)

Social Media

Twitter

Mobile Journalism

Demands of the Audience

Characteristics of Web Writing

Backpack Journalism

Lateral Reporting

Web Packages

Points for Consideration and Discussion

Further Reading

Web Sites

Exercises

Chapter 11. Writing Advertising Copy

A Love—Hate Relationship

The Field of Advertising

Beginning the Process: Needs and Appeals

The Audience

The Product

The Advertising Situation

Copy Platforms

Writing the Ad

Elements of a Print Ad

Writing Advertising for Broadcast

The Tools of Broadcast Advertising

Commercial Formats

Storyboards

Web Advertising

Other Media

Conclusion

Points for Consideration and Discussion

Further Reading

Web Sites

Exercises

Chapter 12. Writing for Public Relations

The Public Relations Process

An Organization’s “Publics”

The Work of the PR Practitioner

Writing News Releases

Video News Releases

Letters

Company Publications

Oral Presentations

Conclusion

Points for Consideration and Discussion

Further Reading

Web Sites

Exercises

Chapter 13. The Writer and the Law

The First Amendment

Defamation

The Plaintiff’s Case

Affirmative Defenses

Privacy

Copyright and Trademarks

Advertising

Broadcast Regulation

Conclusion

Further Reading

Web Sites

Chapter 14. Getting a job in the Mass Media

Personal Attributes

Building an Audience

Networking and Landing the First Job

Get Started

Points for Consideration and Discussion

Appendix A Copy-Editing Symbols

Appendix B Grammar and Diagnostic Exams

Appendix C Problem Words and Phrases

Appendix D Advertising Copy Sheets

Glossary

Index


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