Writing for the Visual Arts / Edition 1

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Overview

Written in a reader-friendly style interlaced with vivid examples, this how-to writing manual for visual artists details a comprehensive and concise methodology for the full spectrum of writing tasks they will encounter in both the academic and professional worlds--academic research papers, resumes, letters of application, manifestos, press releases, and grants. It emphasizes that professionals' art, in itself, will not always speak for them, and that they must, therefore, learn to articulate their concepts and ideas, and to argue for, and earn, their place in the world of art. Abundant examples (of stages of document development and complete documents) represent amateur as well as professional sources and an exceptionally full spectrum of visual art--painting, sculpting, collage, drawing, graphic arts, architecture, film, and theater. How to Write Academic Art Papers. How to Write about Your Art. How to Revise and Peer Review. How to Write a Resume. How to Write an Application Cover Letter. How to Write a Manifesto. How to Write Press Releases. How to Write Grants and Proposals. For visual artists of all kinds.

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Bernstein and Yatchisin (both of U. of California, Santa Barbara) have packed much information into this readable, slim volume that will be immensely useful to undergraduate art and art history students who are learning to write meaningfully about art. The text uses many examples of good and bad writing by way of illustration to the various crucial aspects of writing a successful academic paper. Subsequent chapters teach how to write about one's own art; how to revise and peer review; and how to write a r<'e>sum<'e>, a letter of application, an art manifesto, a press release, and grants and proposals. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780130225481
  • Publisher: Pearson
  • Publication date: 9/21/2000
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 160
  • Sales rank: 315,994
  • Product dimensions: 5.43 (w) x 7.79 (h) x 0.55 (d)

Read an Excerpt

PREFACE TO THE STUDENT

We based this handbook on our experiences over the past decade teaching a course entitled "Writing for the Visual Arts" that we developed at the University of California, Santa Barbara. The course appeals to our students because it allows them to think and write like professional artists, not just artists-in-training. We also devised a curriculum directly pertinent to them, teaching students to handle tasks they will confront in the world beyond college. This handbook has the same intent.

As beginning artists, you probably don't realize the amount of writing you will have to produce: grant proposals, resumes, letters of application, descriptions of your work, and so on. Your art, in itself, will not always speak for you. Our purpose in this handbook is to help you, the evolving artist, learn to articulate your concepts and ideas, and also to argue for and earn your place in the world of art.

We define visual arts not only in its most traditional sense-painting, sculpting, collage, drawing, graphic arts, architecture-but also in ways that include film and theater. Our examples of artists and their works, taken from amateur as well as professional sources, run the gamut of these arts. Students in art history, dramatic arts, communications, and English will also benefit from this text.

In essence, we see this book as a kind of how-to, taking you from the writing you have to produce in college to writing you will encounter as professionals in the field. In this light, we present each chapter as a discrete unit, a particular lesson for a specific rhetorical situation. That said, of course the lessons in each chapter overlap andreinforce each other. We begin with the academic paper. In the Chapter 2 we discuss how to write about one's own art. Next the book moves into areas that will impact on you as you enter the marketplace: chapters on writing resumes, letters of application, manifestos, and press releases. Chapter 8 covers writing grants and proposals. In all the chapters, we deal with the general rhetorical and grammatical skills that underpin all types of art writing. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

We would like to thank the faculty of the Writing Program at the University of California, Santa Barbara for encouraging the development of writing classes that extend the range of possibilities in the discipline. We would also like to thank our students, who provided such positive feedback to our course and especially to those students whose writing appears in this text. Thank you to the reviewers for their valuable comments: Cynthia Maris Dantzic, Long Island University-Brooklyn and Wayne Enstice, University of Cincinnati.

Mashey would like to thank Joan Worley who first taught the class at UCSB and George offers his special thanks for the ever-lasting, ever-wonderful support of Amy Esau, spouse nonpareil.

Mashey Bernstein and George Yatchisin
University of California, Santa Barbara

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Table of Contents

1. How to Write Academic Art Papers: Welcome to the Community.

2. How to Write about Your Art.

3. How to Revise and Peer Review: “Stitching and Restitching.”

4. How to Write a Résumé: A Lifetime in 30 Seconds.

5. How to Write a Letter of Application.

6. Writing Art Manifestos: Expressing Your Philosophy.

7. How to Write Press Releases: An Invitation to Your Art.

8. How to Write Grants and Proposals.

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Preface

PREFACE

TO THE STUDENT

We based this handbook on our experiences over the past decade teaching a course entitled "Writing for the Visual Arts" that we developed at the University of California, Santa Barbara. The course appeals to our students because it allows them to think and write like professional artists, not just artists-in-training. We also devised a curriculum directly pertinent to them, teaching students to handle tasks they will confront in the world beyond college. This handbook has the same intent.

As beginning artists, you probably don't realize the amount of writing you will have to produce: grant proposals, resumes, letters of application, descriptions of your work, and so on. Your art, in itself, will not always speak for you. Our purpose in this handbook is to help you, the evolving artist, learn to articulate your concepts and ideas, and also to argue for and earn your place in the world of art.

We define visual arts not only in its most traditional sense-painting, sculpting, collage, drawing, graphic arts, architecture-but also in ways that include film and theater. Our examples of artists and their works, taken from amateur as well as professional sources, run the gamut of these arts. Students in art history, dramatic arts, communications, and English will also benefit from this text.

In essence, we see this book as a kind of how-to, taking you from the writing you have to produce in college to writing you will encounter as professionals in the field. In this light, we present each chapter as a discrete unit, a particular lesson for a specific rhetorical situation. That said, of course the lessons in each chapter overlap and reinforce each other. We begin with the academic paper. In the Chapter 2 we discuss how to write about one's own art. Next the book moves into areas that will impact on you as you enter the marketplace: chapters on writing resumes, letters of application, manifestos, and press releases. Chapter 8 covers writing grants and proposals. In all the chapters, we deal with the general rhetorical and grammatical skills that underpin all types of art writing.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

We would like to thank the faculty of the Writing Program at the University of California, Santa Barbara for encouraging the development of writing classes that extend the range of possibilities in the discipline. We would also like to thank our students, who provided such positive feedback to our course and especially to those students whose writing appears in this text. Thank you to the reviewers for their valuable comments: Cynthia Maris Dantzic, Long Island University-Brooklyn and Wayne Enstice, University of Cincinnati.

Mashey would like to thank Joan Worley who first taught the class at UCSB and George offers his special thanks for the ever-lasting, ever-wonderful support of Amy Esau, spouse nonpareil.

Mashey Bernstein and George Yatchisin
University of California, Santa Barbara

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