Writing Home. Black Writing In Britain Since The War

Overview

When the SS Empire Windrush berthed at Tilbury docks in 1948 with 492 ex-servicemen from the Caribbean, it marked the beginning of the post-war migrations to Britain that would form part of modern, multi-cultural Britain. A significant role in this social transformation would be played by the literary and non-literary output of writers from the Caribbean. These writers in exile were responsible not just for the establishment of the West Indian novel, but, by virtue of their location in the Mother Country, were ...

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Overview

When the SS Empire Windrush berthed at Tilbury docks in 1948 with 492 ex-servicemen from the Caribbean, it marked the beginning of the post-war migrations to Britain that would form part of modern, multi-cultural Britain. A significant role in this social transformation would be played by the literary and non-literary output of writers from the Caribbean. These writers in exile were responsible not just for the establishment of the West Indian novel, but, by virtue of their location in the Mother Country, were also the pioneers of black writing in Britain. Over the next fifty years, this writing would come to represent an important body of work intimately aligned to the evolving and contentious notions of 'home' as economic migration became a permanent presence. In this book, David Ellis provides in-depth analyses of six key figures whose writing charts the establishment of black Britain. For Sam Selvon, George Lamming, and E. R. Braithwaite, writing home represents a literature of reappraisal as the myths of empire--the gold-paved streets of London--conflict with the harsh realities of being designated an immigrant. The unresolved consequences of this reappraisal are made evident in the works of Andrew Salkey, Wilson Harris, and Linton Kwesi Johnson where radicalism in both political and literary terms can be read as a response to the rejection of the black communities by an increasingly divided Britain in the 1970s. Finally, the novels of Caryl Phillips, Joan Riley, and David Dabydeen mark an increasingly reflective literature as the notion of home shifts more explicitly from the Caribbean to Britain itself. Containing both contextual and biographical information throughout, "Writing Home" represents a literary and social history of the emergence of black Britain in the second half of the twentieth century.

ibidem Press

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Of use to students and scholars working in a variety of disciplines and interdisciplinary fields such as Literature, English Studies, Contemporary British Politics, and Contemporary British History." Kelvingrove Review

ibidem Press

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9783898215916
  • Publisher: ibidem-Verlag Haunschild / Schoen GbR
  • Publication date: 4/20/2007
  • Series: Studies in English Literatures Series, #5
  • Pages: 244
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.55 (d)

Meet the Author

David Ellis

Dr David Ellis is a Principal Lecturer in English at the University of Wolverhampton.

ibidem Press

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Table of Contents

Foreword: The Question of an AudiencePart 11.0 Introduction: The First Generation1.1 Sam Selvon: The Lonely Exile1.2 George Lamming: The Natural Exile1.3 E. R. Braithwaite: The Cultural ExilePart 22.0 Introduction: The Second Generation2.1 Wilson Harris: Unlikely Fiction2.2 Andrew Salkey: The Middle Man2.3 Linton Kwesi Johnson: Creation RebelPart 33.0 Introduction: The Present Generation3.1 Joan Riley: Caribbean Conversations I3.2 Caryl Phillips: Caribbean Conversations II3.3 David Dabydeen: Caribbean Conversations IIIBibliography

ibidem Press

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