Writing Information Security Policies / Edition 1 by Scott Barman | 9781578702640 | Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Writing Information Security Policies / Edition 1

Writing Information Security Policies / Edition 1

5.0 1
by Scott Barman
     
 

ISBN-10: 157870264X

ISBN-13: 9781578702640

Pub. Date: 11/16/2001

Publisher: Sams

Administrators, more technically savvy than their managers, have started to secure the networks in a way they see as appropriate. When management catches up to the notion that security is important, system administrators have already altered the goals and business practices. Although they may be grateful to these people for keeping the network secure, their efforts

Overview

Administrators, more technically savvy than their managers, have started to secure the networks in a way they see as appropriate. When management catches up to the notion that security is important, system administrators have already altered the goals and business practices. Although they may be grateful to these people for keeping the network secure, their efforts do not account for all assets and business requirements Finally, someone decides it is time to write a security policy. Management is told of the necessity of the policy document, and they support its development. A manager or administrator is assigned to the task and told to come up with something, and fast! Once security policies are written, they must be treated as living documents. As technology and business requirements change, the policy must be updated to reflect the new environment--at least one review per year. Additionally, policies must include provisions for security awareness and enforcement while not impeding corporate goals. This book serves as a guide to writing and maintaining these all-important security policies.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781578702640
Publisher:
Sams
Publication date:
11/16/2001
Series:
Landmark Series
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
240
Sales rank:
1,048,712
Product dimensions:
7.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.60(d)

Table of Contents

(NOTE: Each chapter concludes with a Summary.)

I. STARTING THE POLICY PROCESS.

1. What Information Security Policies Are.

About Information Security Policies. Why Policies Are Important. When Policies Should Be Developed. How Policies Should Be Developed.

2. Determining Your Policy Needs.

Identify What Is to Be Protected. Identify From Whom It Is Being Protected. Data Security Considerations. Backups, Archival Storage, and Disposal of Data. Intellectual Property Rights and Policies. Incident Response and Forensics.

3. Information Security Responsibilities.

Management Responsibility. Role of the Information Security Department. Other Information Security Roles. Understanding Security Management and Law Enforcement. Information Security Awareness Training and Support.

II. WRITING THE SECURITY POLICIES.

4. Physical Security.

Computer Location and Facility Construction. Facilities Access Controls. Contingency Planning. General Computer Systems Security. Periodic System and Network Configuration Audits. Staffing Considerations.

5. Authentication and Network Security.

Network Addressing and Architecture. Network Access Control. Login Security. Passwords. User Interface. Access Controls. Telecommuting and Remote Access.

6. Internet Security Policies.

Understanding the Door to the Internet. Administrative Responsibilities. User Responsibilities. World Wide Web Policies. Application Responsibilities. VPNs, Extranets, Intranets, and Other Tunnels. Modems and Other Backdoors. Employing PKI and Other Controls. Electronic Commerce.

7. Email Security Policies.

Rules for Using Email. Administration of Email. Use of Email for Confidential Communication.

8. Viruses, Worms, and Trojan Horses.

The Need for Protection. Establishing the Type of Virus Protection. Rules for Handling Third-Party Software. User Involvement with Viruses.

9. Encryption.

Legal Issues. Managing Encryption. Handling Encryption and Encrypted Data. Key Generation Considerations. Key Management.

10. Software Development Policies.

Software Development Processes. Testing and Documentation. Revision Control and Configuration Management. Third-Party Development. Intellectual Property Issues.

III. MAINTAINONG THE POLICIES.

11. Acceptable Use Policies.

Writing the AUP. User Login Responsibilities. Use of Systems and Network. User Responsibilities. Organization's Responsibilities and Disclosures. Common-Sense Guidelines About Speech.

12. Compliance and Enforcement.

Testing and Effectiveness of the Policies. Publishing and Notification Requirements of the Policies. Monitoring, Controls, and Remedies. Administrator's Responsibility. Logging Considerations. Reporting of Security Problems. Considerations When Computer Crimes Are Committed.

13. The Policy Review Process.

Periodic Reviews of Policy Documents. What the Policy Reviews Should Include. The Review Committee.

IV. APPENDIXES.

Appendix A. Glossary.

Appendix B. Resources.

Incident Response Teams. Other Incident Response Information. Virus Protection. Vendor-Specific Security Information. Security Information Resources. Security Publications. Industry Consortia and Associations. Hacker and “Underground” Organizations. Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. Survivability. Cryptography Policies and Regulations. Security Policy References.

Appendix C. Sample Policies.

Sample Acceptable Use Policy. Sample Email Security Policy. Sample Administrative Policies.

Index.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Writing Information Security Policies 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I just got this book and I'm already half way through. There are already some huge books out there about writing Security Policies, but they're overkill for most environments. This book is written in a very easy to understand style. Unlike some of the technical books gathering dust on my shelf, this one's going to get USED.