Writing Today / Edition 2

Paperback (Print)
Rent
Rent from BN.com
$20.11
(Save 79%)
Est. Return Date: 02/26/2015
Buy Used
Buy Used from BN.com
$57.93
(Save 38%)
Item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging.
Condition: Used – Good details
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $30.00
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 68%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (29) from $30.00   
  • New (7) from $65.94   
  • Used (22) from $30.00   

Overview

Note: You are purchasing a standalone product; MyWritingLab does not come packaged with this content. If you would like to purchase both the physical text and MyWritingLab search for ISBN-10: 0133970396 /ISBN-13: 9780133970395 . That package includes ISBN-10: 0133944131 / ISBN-13: 9780133944136, ISBN-10: 013394414X / ISBN-13: 9780133944143 and ISBN-10: 032198465X / ISBN-13: 9780321984654.

MyWritingLab is not a self-paced technology and should only be purchased when required by an instructor.

Organized by genre–practical for college and career

Accessible to students and flexible for instructors, Writing Today, Third Edition introduces students to the conventions of writing memoirs, profiles, literary analyses, arguments, research papers, and more. Each chapter features a step-by-step process for composing within a given genre, as well as exemplary student and professional readings to promote rhetorical knowledge and critical analysis. The 42 short chapters, the chunked writing style, and visual instruction work to ensure that students will transfer the skills and strategies practiced in your class to their other classes, their lives, and their careers. From its graphic “Quick Start Guides” to its “Write This” prompts, Writing Today challenges students to extend the boundaries of their writing abilities as they practice composing for the real world.

Also available with MyWritingLab

This title is also available with MyWritingLab — an online homework, tutorial, and assessment program designed to work with this text to engage students and improve results. Within its structured environment, students practice what they learn, test their understanding, and pursue a personalized study plan that helps them better absorb course material and understand difficult concepts.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780205210084
  • Publisher: Longman
  • Publication date: 1/16/2012
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 880
  • Sales rank: 48,151
  • Product dimensions: 7.30 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Table of Contents

NOTE: Both Brief and Comprehensive Tables of Contents follow.

BRIEF TABLE OF CONTENTS

PART 1: GETTING STARTED

1. Writing and Genres

2. Topic, Angle, Purpose

3. Readers, Contexts, and Rhetorical Situations

4. Reading Critically

PART 2: USING GENRES TO EXPRESS IDEAS

5. Memoirs

6. Profiles

7. Reviews
8. Literary Analyses

9. Rhetorical Analyses

10. Commentaries

11. Arguments

12. Proposals

13. Analytical Reports

14. Research Papers

PART 3: DEVELOPING A WRITING PROCESS

15. Inventing Ideas and Prewriting

16. Organizing and Drafting

17. Choosing A Style

18. Designing

19. Revising and Editing

PART 4: STRATEGIES FOR SHAPING IDEAS

20. Developing Paragraphs and Sections

21. Using Basic Rhetorical Patterns

22. Using Argumentative Strategies

23. Collaborating and Peer Response

PART 5: DOING RESEARCH

24. Starting Research

25. Finding Sources and Collecting Evidence

26. Citing, Quoting, Paraphrasing, and Summarizing Sources

27. Using MLA Style

28. Using APA Style

PART 6: GETTING YOUR IDEAS OUT THERE

29. Writing with Social Networking

30. Creating a Portfolio

31. Succeeding on Written Exams and Assessment

32. Presenting Your Work

PART 7: ANTHOLOGY OF READINGS

33. Memoirs
34. Profiles

35. Reviews

36. Literary Analyses

37. Rhetorical Analysis

38. Commentaries

39. Arguments

40. Proposals

41. Reports

42. Research Papers

PART 8: HANDBOOK

1. Sentences

2. Verbs

3. Pronouns

4. Style

5. Punctuation, Mechanics, and Spelling

Appendix: Readings Arranged by Theme

Credits

Index


COMPREHENSIVE TABLE OF CONTENTS

PART 1: GETTING STARTED

1. Writing and Genres

What Are Genres?

Using Genres to Write Successfully

Writing with Genres

Genres Are Flexible

Genres Are Adaptable to Various Situations

Genres Evolve to Suit Various Fields

Genres Shape Situations and Readers

Genres Can Be Played With

Genres in Movies

Genres and the Writing Process

Using a Writing Process

Using Genres as a Guiding Concept

Transfer: Using Genres in College and in Your Career

Quick Start Guide

Talk About This

Try This Out

Write This

2. Topic, Angle, Purpose

Topic: What Am I Writing About?

Angle: What Is New About the Topic?

What Has Changed to Make This Topic Interesting Right Now?

What Unique Experiences, Expertise, or Knowledge Do I Have About This Topic?

Purpose: What Should I Accomplish?

Thesis Statement (Main Claim)

Informative Thesis

Argumentative Thesis

Question or Open-Ended Thesis

Implied Thesis

Choosing the Appropriate Genre

3. Readers, Contexts, and Rhetorical Situations

Profiling Readers

A Brief Reader Profile

Who Are My Readers?

What Are Their Expectations?

Where Will They Be Reading?

When Will They Be Reading?

Why Will They Be Reading?

How Will They Be Reading?

An Extended Reader Profile

What Are Their Needs?

What Are Their Values?

Personal Values

Customs of Their Society

Cultural Values

What Is Their Attitude Toward You and the Issue?

Analyzing the Context

Medium

Paper Documents

Electronic Documents

Public Presentations

Podcasts or Videos

Social and Political Influences

Social Trends

Economic Trends

Political Trends

Genres and the Rhetorical Situation

Angles

Purpose

Readers

Contexts

4. Reading Critically

Looking Through and Looking At a Text

Reading Critically: Seven Strategies

Strategy 1: Preview the Text

Strategy 2: Play the Believing and Doubting Game

Strategy 3: Annotate the Text

Strategy 4: Analyze the Proofs in the Text

Strategy 5: Contextualize the Text

Strategy 6: Analyze Your Own Assumptions and Beliefs

Strategy 7: Respond to the Text

Using Critical Reading to Strengthen Your Writing

Responding to a Text: Evaluating What Others Have Written

Responding with a Text’s Positions, Terms, and Ideas: Using What Others Have Written

PART 2: USING GENRES TO EXPRESS IDEAS

5. Memoirs

At-A-Glance: Memoirs

One Student’s Work: Helen Sanderson, “Diving In”

Inventing Your Memoir’s Content

Inquiring: Finding an Interesting Topic

Inquiring: Finding Out What You Already Know

Make a Map of the Scene

Record Your Story as a Podcast or Video

Storyboard the Event

Do Some Role Playing

Researching: Finding Out What Others Know

Online Sources

Print Sources

Empirical Sources

Organizing and Drafting Your Memoir

Setting the Scene in Rich Detail

The People

The Scenes

Dialogue

Main Point or Thesis

Describing the Complication

The Event

The Complication

The Immediate Reaction

Evaluating and Resolving the Complication

The Evaluation

The Resolution

Concluding with a Point–An Implied Thesis

Choosing an Appropriate Style

Evoking an Appropriate Tone or Voice

Using Dialogue

Use Dialogue to Move the Story Forward

Write the Way Your Characters Speak

Trim the Extra Words

Identify Who Is Talking

Create Unique Voices for Characters

Designing Your Memoir

Choose the Medium

Add Visuals, Especially Photos

Find a Place to Publish

Revising and Editing Your Memoir

Make Your Title Enticing

Craft the Perfect Lead

Reevaluate the Details and Cut the Fat

Microgenre: The Literacy Narrative

Frederick Douglass, “Learning to Read and Write”

Quick Start Guide

Readings

Jean Whatley, “My Ex Went to Prison for Sex Crimes”

Thaddeus Gunn, “Slapstick”

Talk About This

Try This Out

Explore This

Write This

6. Profiles

At-A-Glance: Profiles

One Student’s Work: Katie Koch, “Brother, Life Coach, Friend”

Inventing Your Profile’s Content

Inquiring: Finding Out What You Already Know

Answer the Five-W and How Questions

Use Cubing

Researching: Finding Out What Others Know

Online Sources

Print Sources

Empirical Sources

Interviewing

Shadowing

Organizing and Drafting Your Profile

The Introduction

Identify Your Topic and Purpose

State Your Main Point or Thesis

The Body

Describe Your Subject

Offer Background on the Subject

Use Anecdotes to Tell Stories

Reveal Important Information Through Dialogue or Quotes

The Conclusion

Choosing an Appropriate Style

Change the Pace

Choose Words That Set a Specific Tone

Get Into Character

Designing Your Profile

Use Headings

Add Photographs

Include Pull Quotes or Breakouts

Revising and Editing Your Profile

Trim the Details That Do Not Advance Your Point

Rethink the Organization

Proofread

Microgenre: The Bio

Stephanie Wilson, NASA Astronaut

Quick Start Guide

Readings

Tim Madigan, “The Serial Rapist is Not Who You Think”

Eric Wills, “Hot for Creature”

Talk About This

Try This Out

Explore This

Write This

7. Reviews

At-A-Glance: Reviews

One Student’s Work: Christina Lieffring, “BBJ Lawnside Blues & BBQ”

Inventing Your Review’s Content

Inquiring: Discovering Common Expectations

Researching: Gathering Background Information

Answer the Five-W and How Questions

Locate Other Reviews of Your Subject

Interview or Survey Others

Prepare to Do Field Observations

Researching: Go Experience It

Organizing and Drafting Your Review

The Introduction

Identify Your Topic and Offer Background Information

State Your Purpose

State Your Main Point or Thesis

Description or Summary of the Subject

Chronological Description or Summary

Feature-by-Feature Description

Discussion of Strengths and Shortcomings

Conclusion

Choosing an Appropriate Style

Use Plenty of Detail

Set the Appropriate Tone

Changing the Pace

Designing Your Review

Choose the Appropriate Medium

Add Photographs, Audio, or Video Clips

Revising and Editing Your Review

Determine Whether Your Opinion Has Evolved

Review Your Expectations

Improve Your Tone

Edit and Proofread

Microgenre: The Rave

Haley Frederick, “Hunger Games: Catching Fire Review”

Quick Start Guide

Readings

Christy Lemire, “The Lego Movie”

Andy Greenwald, “Sherlock: Resurrection”

Talk About This

Try This Out

Explore This

Write This

8. Literary Analyses

At-A-Glance: Literary Analyses

One Student’s Work: STUDENT NAME AND TITLE OF PIECE--TK

Inventing Your Literary Analysis’s Content

Read, Reread, Explore

Inquiring: What’s Interesting Here?

Explore the Genre

Explore the Complication or Conflict

Explore the Plot

Explore the Characters

Explore the Setting

Explore the Language and Tone

Researching: What Background Do You Need?

Research the Author

Research the Historical Setting

Research the Science

Organizing and Drafting Your Literary Analysis

The Introduction: Establish Your Interpretive Question

Include Background Information That Leads To Your Interpretive Question

State Your Interpretative Question Prominently and Clearly

Place Your Thesis at or Near the End of the Introduction

The Body: Summarize, Interpret, Support

Summarize and Describe Key Aspects of the Work

Build Your Case, Step by Step

Cite and Quote the Text to Back Up and Illustrate Your Points

Include Outside Support, Where Appropriate

The Conclusion: Restate Your Thesis

Choosing an Appropriate Style

Use the “Literary Present” Tense

Integrate Quoted Text

When You Quote, Tell Readers What You Want Them to Notice

Move Beyond Personal Response

Cast Interpretations as Speculative

Designing Your Literary Analysis

Revising and Editing Your Literary Analysis

Make Sure the Interpretative Question and Its Importance Are Clearly Stated

Check Your Main Claim, or What Your Interpretation Reveals About the Work

Check Whether Your Analysis Remains Focused on Your Interpretative Question and Main Claim

Make Sure You Cite, Quote, and Explain Specific Parts of the Literary Text

Verify That You Have Cited the Text Appropriately

Microgenre: The Reading Response

A Student’s Reading Response to Paul Laurence Dunbar’s, “We Wear the Mask”

Quick Start Guide

Readings

Kate Chopin, “The Story of an Hour”

Daniel P. Deneau, “An Enigma in Chopin’s ‘The Story of an Hour’”

Talk About This

Try This Out

Explore This

Write This

9. Rhetorical Analyses

At-A-Glance: Rhetorical Analyses

One Student’s Work: Claire XXX, “Rhetorical Analysis of Match.com”

Inventing Your Rhetorical Analysis’s Content

Inquiring: Highlight Uses of Proofs

Logos: Highlighting Uses of Reason

Ethos: Highlighting Uses of Credibility

Pathos: Highlighting Uses of Emotion

Researching: Finding Background Information

Online Sources

Print Sources

Empirical Sources

Organizing and Drafting Your Rhetorical Analysis

The Introduction

Identify the Subject of Your Analysis and Offer Background Information

State the Purpose of Your Analysis

State Your Main Point or Thesis Statement

Stress the Importance of the Topic

Explanation of Rhetorical Concepts

Provide Historical Context and Summary

Historical Context

Summary

Analysis of the Text

The Conclusion

Choosing an Appropriate Style

Use Lots of Detail to Describe the Text

Minimize the Jargon and Difficult Words

Improve the Flow of Your Sentences

Pay Attention to Sentence Length

Designing Your Rhetorical Analysis

Download Images from the Internet

Add a Screen Shot

Include a Link to a Podcast

Make a Web Site

Revising and Editing Your Rhetorical Analysis

Recheck Definitions of the Rhetorical Concepts

Expand Your Analysis

Copyedit for Clarity

Read Your Work Out Loud

Microgenre: The Ad Critique

Paloma Aleman, “The Axe Effect”

Quick Start Guide

Readings

Edward Hoagland, “The Courage of Turtles”

Adam Regn Arvidson, “Nature Writing in America: Criticism Through Imagery”

Talk About This

Try This Out

Explore This

Write This

10. Commentaries

At-A-Glance: Commentaries

One Student’s Work: David Meany,“Why My Generation Doesn’t Care About Performance

Enhancement”

Inventing You Commentary’s Content

Inquiring: Finding Out What You Already Know

Researching: Finding Out What Others Know

Organizing and Drafting Your Commentary

The Introduction

Explain the Current Event or Issue

Support Your Position

Clarify Your Position

The Conclusion

Choosing an Appropriate Style

Get into Character

Imitate a Well-Known Writer

Match Your Tone to Your Readers’ Expectations

Use Analogies, Similes, and Metaphors

Designing Your Commentary

Revising and Editing Your Commentary

Microgenre: Letter to the Editor

Caroline Klinker, “ Letter to the Editor: Modern-Day Religious Climate on Campus is Detrimental”

Quick Start Guide

Readings

Greg Hampikian, “When May I Shoot a Student?”

Jim Valvano, “Don’t Ever Give Up”

Talk About This

Try This Out

Explore This

Write This

11. Arguments

At-A-Glance: Arguments

One Student’s Work: “Allowing Guns on Campus will Prevent Shootings, Rape” by Tyler Ohmann

Inventing Your Argument’s Content

Inquiring: Identifying Your Topic

Inquiring: Identifying Points of Contention

Researching: Finding Out What Others Believe and Why

Organizing and Drafting Your Argument

The Introduction

Summary and Limitations of Opposing Positions

Your Understanding of the Issue

Reasons Why Your Understanding is Stronger

Conclusion

Choosing an Appropriate Style

Use Plain Style to Describe the Opposing Position

Use Similes, Metaphors, and Analogies When Describing Your Position

Use Top-Down Paragraphs

Define Unfamiliar Terms

Designing Your Argument

Revising and Editing Your Argument

Microgenre: The Rebuttal

Marshall Connolly, “Global Warming Most Definitely Not a Hoax--A Scientist's Rebuttal”

Quick Start Guide

Readings

Ted Miller, “Should College Football Be Banned?”

Kate Dailey, "Friends with Benefits: Do Facebook Friends Provide the Same Support As Those In Real

Life?"

Talk About This

Try This Out

Explore This

Write This

12. Proposals

At-A-Glance: Proposals

One Student Group’s Work: “SCC Café Proposal”

Inventing Your Proposal’s Content

Inquiring: Defining the Problem

Inquiring: Analyzing the Problem

Researching: Gathering Information and Sources

Inquiring: Planning to Solve the Problem

Researching: Finding Similar Projects

Organizing and Drafting Your Proposal

The Introduction

Description of the Problem, Its Causes, and Its Effects

Description of Your Plan

Discussing the Costs and Benefits of Your Plan

The Conclusion

Choosing an Appropriate Style

Designing Your Proposal

Revising and Editing Your Proposal

Microgenre: The Pitch

Hans Fex, “Mini Museum”

Quick Start Guide

Readings

Samuel Goldman, “How to Fix Grade Inflation at Harvard”

Jim Rough, “A Rebirth of ‘We the People’”

Talk About This

Try This Out
Explore This

Write This

13. Analytical Reports

At-A-Glance: Reports

One Student Group’s Work: Kaisa Lee and Jamie Koss, “College Students’ Attitudes on the Causes of

Infidelity”

Inventing Your Analytical Report’s Content

Inquiring: Finding Out What You Already Know

Researching: Creating a Research Plan

Researching: Gathering Sources and Revisiting Your Hypothesis

Organizing and Drafting Your Analytical Report
Executive Summary of Abstract

Introduction

Methods Section

Findings or Results Section

Discussion Section

Conclusion/Recommendations

References or Works Cited

Appendices

Choosing an Appropriate Style

Designing Your Report

Revising and Editing Your Report

Microgenre: The Explainer

World Freerunning Parkour Federation, “What is Parkour?”

Quick Start Guide

Readings

Andrew Gelman and George A. Romero, “How Many Zombies Do You Know? Using Indirect

Survey Methods to Measure Alien Attacks and Outbreaks of the Undead”

Pew Research Center, “The Rising Cost of Not Going to College”

Talk About This

Try This Out

Explore This

Write This

14. Research Papers

At-A-Glance: Research Papers

One Student’s Work: “Cheating in College: Where it Happens, Why Students Do It and How to Stop It”

by Bryce Buchmann

Inventing Your Research Paper’s Content

Inquiring: Defining Your Topic, Angle, Purpose

Researching: Finding Out What Others Know

Organizing and Drafting Your Research Paper

The Introduction

The Body

The Conclusion

Works Cited or References

Choosing an Appropriate Style

Designing Your Research Paper

Revising and Editing Your Research Paper

Microgenre: The Annotated Bibliography

Sara Rodriguez, “Annotated Bibliography: The Fog of Revolution”

Quick Start Guide

Readings

Paul Rosenzweig et al, “Drone in U.S. Airspace: Principles for Governance”

James Knoll, “Serial Murder: A Forensic Psychiatric Perspective”

Talk About This

Try This Out

Explore This

Write This

PART 3: DEVELOPING A WRITING PROCESS

15. Inventing Ideas and Prewriting

Prewriting

Concept Mapping

Freewriting

Brainstorming or Listing

Storyboarding

Using Heuristics
Asking the Journalist’s Questions

Using the Five Senses

Investigating Logos, Ethos, Pathos

Cubing

Exploratory Writing

Journaling, Blogging, or Microblogging

Writing an Exploratory Draft

Exploring with Presentation Software

Taking Time to Invent and Prewrite

Quick Start Guide

Talk About This

Try This Out

Write This

16. Organizing and Drafting

Sketching Out Your Paper’s Organization

Using the Genre to Create a Basic Outline

Filling Out Your Outline

Drafting Your Introduction

Five Introductory Moves

Using a Grabber to Start Your Introduction

Using a Lead to Draw in the Readers

Drafting the Body of Your Paper

Overcoming Writer’s Block

Drafting Your Conclusion

Quick Start Guide

Talk About This

Try This Out

Write This

17. Choosing A Style

Writing in Plain Style

Guideline 1: Clarify Who or What the Sentence is About

Guideline 2: Make the “Doer” the Subject of the Sentence

Guideline 3: Put the Subject Early in the Sentence

Guideline 4: State the Action in the Verb

Guideline 5: Eliminate Nominalizations

Guideline 6: Boil Down the Prepositional Phrases

Guideline 7: Eliminate Redundancies

Guideline 8: Use Sentences That Are Breathing Length

Establishing Your Voice

Get Into Character

Imitate Others

Writing Descriptively with Figures and Tropes

Use Similes and Analogies

Use Metaphors

Use Personification

Use Onomatopoeia

Use Alliteration and Assonance

Improving Your Writing Style

Quick Start Guide

Talk About This

Try This Out

Write This

18. Designing

Before You Begin Designing

Five Basic Principles of Design

Design Principle 1: Balance

Balancing a Page

Design Principle 2: Alignment

Design Principle 3: Grouping

Design Principle 4: Consistency

Choosing Typefaces

Using Headings Consistently

Design Principle 5: Contrast

Using Photography and Images

Downloading Photographs and Images from the Internet

Labeling a Photograph or Image

Using Graphs and Charts

Creating a Graph or Chart

Choosing the Appropriate Graph or Chart

Quick Start Guide

Talk About This

Try This Out

Write This

19. Revising and Editing

Level 1: Global Revision

Challenge Your Draft’s Topic, Angle, and Purpose

Think About Your Readers (Again) and the Context

Level 2: Substantive Editing

Determine Whether You Have Enough Information (or Too Much)

Reorganize Your Work to Better Use the Genre

Look for Ways to Improve the Design

Ask Someone Else to Read Your Work

Level 3: Copyediting

Review Your Title and Headings

Edit Paragraphs to Make Them Concise and Consistent

Revise Sentences to Make Them Clearer

Revise Sentences to Make Them More Descriptive

Level 4: Proofreading

Read Your Writing Aloud

Read Your Draft Backwards

Read a Hard Copy of Your Work

Know Your Grammatical Weaknesses

Use Your Spell Checker and Grammar Checker

Peer Review: Asking for Advice

Quick Start Guide

Talk About This

Try This Out

Write This

PART 4: STRATEGIES FOR SHAPING IDEAS

20. Developing Paragraphs and Sections

Creating a Basic Paragraph

Transition or Transitional Sentence (Optional)

Topic Sentence (Needed)

Support Sentences (Needed)

Point Sentence (Optional)

Getting Paragraphs to Flow (Cohesion)

Subject Alignment in Paragraphs

Given-New in Paragraphs

Organizing a Section

Opening, Body, Closing

Organizational Patterns for Sections

Using Headings in Sections

Using Sections and Paragraphs Together

Quick Start Guide

Talk About This

Try This Out

Write This

21. Using Basic Rhetorical Patterns

Narrative

Description

Describing with the Senses

Describing with Similes, Metaphors, and Onomatopoeia

Describing with a Mixture of the Senses and Tropes

Definition

Classification

Step One: List Everything That Fits into the Whole Class

Step Two: Decide on a Principle of Classification

Step Three: Sort into Major and Minor Groups

Cause and Effect

Comparison and Contrast

Combining Rhetorical Patterns

Quick Start Guide

Talk About This

Try This Out

Write This

22. Using Argumentative Strategies

What is Arguable?

Arguable Claims

Four Sources of Arguable Claims

Using Reason, Authority, and Emotion

Reason (Logos)

Authority (Ethos)

Emotion (Pathos)

Avoiding Logical Fallacies

Rebuttals and Refutations

Summarize Your Opponents’ Position Objectively

Recognize When the Opposing Position May Be Valid

Concede Some of the Opposing Points

Refute or Absorb Your Opponents’ Major Points

Qualify Your Claims

Quick Start Guide

Talk About This

Try This Out

Write This

23. Collaborating and Peer Response

Working Successfully in Groups

Working Successfully in Teams

Planning the Project

Forming: Planning a Project

Storming: Managing Conflict

Norming: Getting Down to Work

Performing: Working as a Team

Using Peer Response to Improve Your Writing

Types of Peer Response and Document Cycling

Responding Helpfully During Peer Response

Quick Start Guide

Talk About This

Try This Out

Write This

PART 5: DOING RESEARCH

24. Starting Research

Starting Your Research Process

Step One: Define Your Research Question

Step Two: Develop a Working Thesis

Step Three: Devise a Research Plan

Doing Start-Up Research

Assessing a Source’s Reliability

Is the Source Credible?

Is the Source Up to Date?

How Biased Are the Author and the Publisher?

How Biased Are You?

Can You Verify the Evidence in the Source?

Managing Your Research Process

Creating a Research Schedule

Starting Your Bibliography File

Following and Modifying Your Research Plan

When Things Don’t Go As Expected

Quick Start Guide

Talk About This

Try This Out

Write This

25. Finding Sources and Collecting Evidence

Evaluating Sources with Triangulation

Using Primary and Secondary Sources

Finding Electronic and Online Sources

Using Internet Search Engines

Using the Internet Cautiously

Using Documentaries and Television/Radio Broadcasts

Using Wikis, Blogs, and Podcasts

Finding Print Sources

Locating Books At Your Library

Finding Articles At Your Library

Using Empirical Sources

Interviewing People

Using an Informal Survey

Quick Start Guide

Talk About This

Try This Out

Write This

26. Citing, Quoting, Paraphrasing, and Summarizing Sources

Citing

Quoting

Brief Quotations

Long Quotations

Paraphrasing and Summarizing

Paraphrasing

Summarizing

Framing Quotes, Paraphrases, and Summaries

Avoiding Plagiarism

Academic Dishonesty

Patchwriting

Ideas and Words Taken Without Attribution

The Real Problem with Plagiarism

Quick Start Guide

Talk About This

Try This Out

Write This

27. Using MLA Style

Parenthetical Citations

When the Author’s Name Appears in the Sentence

Citing More Than One Source in the Same Sentence

Citing a Source Multiple Times

Other Parenthetical References

Preparing the List of Works Cited

Including More Than One Source from an Author

Formatting a List of Works Cited

Citing Sources in the List of Works Cited

Citing Books and Other Nonperiodical Publications

Citing Journals, Magazines, and Other Periodicals

Citing Web Publications

Citing Other Kinds of Sources

A Student’s MLA-Style Research Paper

Brian Naidus, “A Whole New World: A Background on the Life of the Freshwater Shark”

28. Using APA Style

Parenthetical Citations
When the Author’s Name Appears in the Sentence

Citing More Than One Source in the Same Sentence

Citing a Source Multiple Times

Other Parenthetical References

Preparing the List of References

Formatting a List of References in APA Style

Citing Sources in the List of References

Citing Books and Other Nonperiodical Publications

Citing Journals, Magazines, and Other Periodicals

Citing Web Publications

Citing Other Kinds of Sources

A Student’s APA-Style Research Paper

Austin Duus, “Assortive Mating and Income Inequality”

PART 6: GETTING YOUR IDEAS OUT THERE

29. Writing with Social Networking

Is This Writing?

Creating a Social Networking Site

Choose the Best Site for You

Be Selective About Your “Friends”

Add Regularly to Your Profile

Starting Your Own Blog

Choose a Host Site for Your Blog

Writing and Updating Your Blog

Writing Articles for Wikis

Write the Article

Add Your Article to the Wiki

Putting Videos and Podcasts on the Internet

Create Your Own Video or Record Your Podcast

Edit Your Work

Upload Your Video or Podcast

Quick Start Guide

Talk About This

Try This Out

Write This

30. Creating a Portfolio

Two Basic Kinds of Portfolios

Getting Started on Your Portfolio

Step One: Collecting Your Work

Archiving for a Specific Course

Archiving for Your College Career

Archiving for Your Professional Career

Step Two: Selecting the Best Artifacts

Step Three: Reflecting on Your Work

Your Reflection as an Argument

Step Four: Presenting Your Materials

Creating an E-Portfolio

Keeping Your Portfolio Up to Date

Creating a Starter Résumé

Quick Start Guide

Talk About This

Try This Out

Write This

31. Succeeding on Written Exams and Assessment

Step One: Prepare for the Exam

Work in Study Groups

Ask Your Professor About the Exam

Pay Attention to Themes and Key Concepts

Study the Assessment Rubric or Scoring Guidelines

Create Your Own Questions and Rehearse Possible Answers

Step Two: Start Your Written Exam

Review the Exam Quickly to Gain an Overall Picture

Budget Your Time

Step Three: Answer the Questions

Organize Your Answer

Step Four: Complete the Written Exam

One Student’s Written Exam

Quick Start Guide

Talk About This

Try This Out

Write This

32. Presenting Your Work

Step One: Plan Your Presentation

Ask a Few Key Questions to Get Started

Choose the Appropriate Presentation Technology

Allot Your Time

Step Two: Organize Your Ideas

Introduction: Tell Them What You’re Going to Tell Them

The Body of Your Talk: Tell Them

Conclusion: Tell Them What You Told Them

Question and Answer

Step Three: Design Your Visual Aids

Format Your Slides

Step Four: Prepare Your Delivery

Body Language

Voice and Tone

Step Five: Practice and Rehearse

Practice, Practice, Practice

Rehearse, Rehearse, Rehearse

Quick Start Guide

Talk About This

Try This Out

Write This

PART 7: ANTHOLOGY OF READINGS

33. Memoirs

Edward Abbey, “The First Morning”

Thomas Rogers, “The College Hazing That Changed My Life”

Demetria Martinez, “Lines in the Sand”

Jackie Robinson, “The Noble Experiment”

34. Profiles

Carl Wilkinson, “Dave Grohl and the Foo Fighters”

Jody L. Ipsen, “Prudencia”

Nathan Heller, “Lorde: The Music Phenomenon of the Year” (Parts 1 and 2)

City of Los Angeles Department of Recreation and Parks, General Information for Griffith Park

35. Reviews

Dan Schindel, “’Frozen’ Tries and Fails to be Both Traditional and Modern”

Stephen King, “Why We Crave Horror Movies”

Dorothy Woodend, “Why Watching Christian Blockbuster ‘Noah’ Is Like Sitting in a Giant Bathtub”

Ryan Taljonick, “Tomb Raider: Definitive Edition”

36. Literary Analyses

Steven Monte, “An Overview of ‘Stopping By Woods on a Snowy Evening’”

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3
( 2 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 11, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 24, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)