Writing Tools: 50 Essential Strategies for Every Writer

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Overview

One of America's most influential writing teachers offers a toolbox from which writers of all kinds can draw practical inspiration.

"Writing is a craft you can learn," says Roy Peter Clark. "You need tools, not rules." His book distills decades of experience into 50 tools that will help any writer become more fluent and effective.

WRITING TOOLS covers everything from the ...
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Writing Tools: 50 Essential Strategies for Every Writer

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Overview

One of America's most influential writing teachers offers a toolbox from which writers of all kinds can draw practical inspiration.

"Writing is a craft you can learn," says Roy Peter Clark. "You need tools, not rules." His book distills decades of experience into 50 tools that will help any writer become more fluent and effective.

WRITING TOOLS covers everything from the most basic ("Tool 5: Watch those adverbs") to the more complex ("Tool 34: Turn your notebook into a camera") and provides more than 200 examples from literature and journalism to illustrate the concepts. For students, aspiring novelists, and writers of memos, e-mails, PowerPoint presentations, and love letters, here are 50 indispensable, memorable, and usable tools.
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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
Teacher/author Roy Peter Clark asserts that to improve their craft, young writers need "tools, not rules." In this book, he applies that wisdom by providing 50 usable tools that can be used to sharpen your writing talents. These easy-to-remember tips aren't just for budding novelists; they can be used to hone school compositions, business briefs, and even love letters. Concise, precise, and engaging advice.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780316014984
  • Publisher: Little, Brown and Company
  • Publication date: 9/28/2006
  • Pages: 272
  • Product dimensions: 5.60 (w) x 8.40 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

Roy Peter Clark, has a Ph.D. in medieval literature and is Vice President and Senior Scholar of the world-renowned Poynter Institute. The author or editor of 14 professional books, he is founding director of the National Writer's Workshops, regional conferences that attract 5,000 writers annually.

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Read an Excerpt

Writing Tools

50 Essential Strategies for Every Writer
By Roy Peter Clark

LITTLE, BROWN

Copyright © 2006 Roy Peter Clark
All right reserved.

ISBN: 0-316-01498-2


Chapter One

TOOL 1

Begin sentences with subjects and verbs.

Make meaning early, then let weaker elements branch to the right.

Imagine each sentence you write printed on the world's widest piece of paper. In English, a sentence stretches from left to right. Now imagine this. A writer composes a sentence with subject and verb at the beginning, followed by other subordinate elements, creating what scholars call a right-branching sentence.

I just created one. Subject and verb of the main clause join on the left ("a writer composes") while all other elements branch to the right. Here's another right-branching sentence, written by Lydia Polgreen as the lead of a news story in the New York Times:

Rebels seized control of Cap Haitien, Haiti's second largest city, on Sunday, meeting little resistance as hundreds of residents cheered, burned the police station, plundered food from port warehouses and looted the airport, which was quickly closed. Police officers and armed supporters of President Jean-Bertrand Aristide fled.

That first sentence contains thirty-seven words and ripples with action. The sentence is so full, in fact, that it threatens to fly apart like an overheatedengine. But the writer guides the reader by capturing meaning in the first three words: "Rebels seized control." Think of that main clause as the locomotive that pulls all the cars that follow.

Master writers can craft page after page of sentences written in this structure. Consider this passage by John Steinbeck from Cannery Row, describing the routine of a marine scientist named Doc (the emphasis is mine):

He didn't need a clock. He had been working in a tidal pattern so long that he could feel a tide change in his sleep. In the dawn he awakened, looked out through the windshield and saw that the water was already retreating down the bouldery flat. He drank some hot coffee, ate three sandwiches, and had a quart of beer.

The tide goes out imperceptibly. The boulders show and seem to rise up and the ocean recedes leaving little pools, leaving wet weed and moss and sponge, iridescence and brown and blue and China red. On the bottoms lie the incredible refuse of the sea, shells broken and chipped and bits of skeleton, claws, the whole sea bottom a fantastic cemetery on which the living scamper and scramble.

Steinbeck places subject and verb at or near the beginning of each sentence. Clarity and narrative energy flow through the passage, as one sentence builds on another. He avoids monotony by including the occasional brief introductory phrase ("In the dawn") and by varying the lengths of his sentences, a writing tool we will consider later.

Subject and verb are often separated in prose, usually because we want to tell the reader something about the subject before we get to the verb. This delay, even for good reasons, risks confusing the reader. With care, it can work:

The stories about my childhood, the ones that stuck, that got told and retold at dinner tables, to dates as I sat by red-faced, to my own children by my father later on, are stories of running away.

So begins Anna Quindlen's memoir How Reading Changed My Life, a lead sentence with thirty-one words between subject and verb. When the topic is more technical, the typical effect of separation is confusion, exemplified by this clumsy effort:

A bill that would exclude tax income from the assessed value of new homes from the state education funding formula could mean a loss of revenue for Chesapeake County schools.

Eighteen words separate the subject, "bill," from its weak verb, "could mean," a fatal flaw that turns what could be an important civic story into gibberish.

If the writer wants to create suspense, or build tension, or make the reader wait and wonder, or join a journey of discovery, or hold on for dear life, he can save subject and verb of the main clause until later. As I just did.

Kelley Benham, a former student of mine, reached for this tool when called on to write the obituary of Terry Schiavo, the woman whose long illness and controversial death became the center of an international debate about the end of life:

Before the prayer warriors massed outside her window, before gavels pounded in six courts, before the Vatican issued a statement, before the president signed a midnight law and the Supreme Court turned its head, Terri Schiavo was just an ordinary girl, with two overweight cats, an unglamorous job and a typical American life.

By delaying the main subject and verb, the writer tightens the tension between a celebrated cause and an ordinary girl.

This variation works only when most sentences branch to the right, a pattern that creates meaning, momentum, and literary power. "The brilliant room collapses," writes Carol Shields in The Stone Diaries,

leaving a solid block of darkness. Only her body survives, and the problem of what to do with it. It has not turned to dust. A bright, droll, clarifying knowledge comes over her at the thought of her limbs and organs transformed to biblical dust or even funereal ashes. Laughable.

And admirable.

WORKSHOP

1. Read through the New York Times or your local newspaper with a pencil in hand. Mark the locations of subjects and verbs.

2. Do the same with examples of your writing.

3. Do the same with a draft you are working on now.

4. The next time you struggle with a sentence, rewrite it by placing subject and verb at the beginning.

5. For dramatic variation, write a sentence with subject and verb near the end.

(Continues...)



Excerpted from Writing Tools by Roy Peter Clark Copyright © 2006 by Roy Peter Clark. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 37 )
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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 37 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 2, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    My daughter learned a lot from this book

    She used this information in her own writing skills. She loves to write! She is now reading a book called, Smitty's Cave Adventures. She really likes that book too! Good summer reading material.

    6 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 13, 2008

    Most Outstanding Writing Book

    This is the most outstanding writing book I have ever read. Believe me I have read quite a few. Clark writes as though you - the reader - are seated in class and he, the teacher is before you, talking to you. The style he employed in writing the book is probably the first lesson an aspiring writer like me learns from.

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 27, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    quite an appetizer

    I think this is the first book I ever read on writing.

    Cruising the bookstore, it sat on the shelf cover forward. The nibble pencil caught my eye. Size seemed right. Picked it up, not too heavy. Example tools on the back were fanciful cool.

    Scanned the table of contents. Flipped the pages, and tasted some. Bought the book. Read it through. Began buying copies for others.

    Still returning to it just for kicks. Open to a random page, and reread.

    Things click.

    I'm not a pro. Don't really teach. Yet I suggest "Writing Tools" has utility for anyone who has to read other people's writing.

    Sent copies to my Gen Xer nephew and niece. Hope they tried it.

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 7, 2012

    Wonderful!

    I am enjoying this book! The information contained within is clear and well written. I am using it to teach my teenage son to write better papers, and it has proven to be very useful and easy to use.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 21, 2012

    Very glad I purchased

    I've just read the first chapter, and already I'm hooked. Very good. Very clear and easy to read (as a book on writing should be--but I appreciate, nonetheless), and the ideas made me want to write and to re-examine what I have written.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 21, 2009

    The best investment in writing you can make

    Read and heed two chapters a day (they are quick and easy reads) you will be a better writer in a month

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 14, 2014

    A writer's handbook

    This should be on every writer's bookshelf and the material contained herein commited to his or her repertoire.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 5, 2013

    Great book for aspiring writers!

    As a neophyte in the world, I found this book of 'tools' incredibly helpful and inspiring. I highly recommend it to all prospective writers and journalists.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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